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John Beighton Worcs Regt Service Record query


wampa
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Hi All,

 

I was wondering if anyone could help with decyphering the handwriting on this service record.

 

It belongs to John Beighton of the 5th and then 2nd Worcesters. He suffered a GSW to his right calf at Delvilles Wood, but Im struggling to read most of what the text says.

 

Can anybody help? And does anybody know much about the Worcesters during this battle?

 

Thanks

 

Wampa

JB Service Record.jpg

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My reading of the statement:-

 

States was wounded in attack.

From Dressing Station to Rouen, 1st

Australian General, 5 days. Then to

Cambridge Hosp, Aldershot ? days. Then

Windlashing? ......? Military Hospital, Surrey

10 weeks. Leave then to Devonport. When

Med. Board marked him CIII. Sent to

Swindon then to Southampton on a

Transport Work Battn. then came on

to Class W. Army Reserve

 

Edited by HarryBrook
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53 minutes ago, HarryBrook said:

My reading of the statement:-

 

States was wounded in attack.

From Dressing Station to Rouen, 1st

Australian General, 5 days. Then to

Cambridge Hosp, Aldershot ? days. Then

Windlashing? ......? Military Hospital, Surrey

10 weeks. Leave then to Devonport. When

Med. Board marked him CIII. Sent to

Swindon then to Southampton on a

Transport Work Battn. then came on

to Class W. Army Reserve

 

Thanks, I read Australian in there too but wasnt sure how that fitted the story. Does it mean Australian Hospital?

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18105 John Beighton awarde SWB number 251543 served 31 8 14 - 14 4 17 discharged wounds aged 25 years 9 months listed as 15th Worcesters. Ralph. 

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Yes, I would read it as 1st Australian General [Hospital], Rouen.

Have also added the name of the hospital on line 5 - Windlesham Moor Military Hospital, Surrey.

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From the Regtl History HM Stacke: pp.189-90

 

That rest was preparatory to a big attack. It had been decided, to; make a great effort to 

clear Delville Wood; and the Wood could not be secured unless the flanking trenches were also
taken. The 100th Brigade would attack from " Orchard Trench " and take both the new German
forward position and also " Tea Trench." The attack was to be made by the 2nd Worcestershire
on the right, the 16th K.R.R.C. and the 1st Queens on the centre and left of the Brigade's front.
Throughout August 23rd the 2nd Worcestershire rested in the reserve trenches : then before
dawn next day the Battalion (a) moved up into the front-line trenches from which the assault was
to be delivered.
THE BATTLE OF DELVILLE WOOD.
The morning of August 24th passed calmly, with some intermittent shelling, but with no
notable incident to disturb the troops ; who dozed as best they could, packed close in the narrow
trenches. Slowly the hot day wore on towards a beautiful summer's evening.
Shortly before 4 p.m. the casual shell-fire of the British artillery increased to a definite
bombardment, which became more intense as it went on. Delville Wood became a volcano with
black and yellow smoke spouting up among the stripped stems of the trees. At 5-45 p.m. the guns
further to the right lifted their fire, and the troops of the 14th Division in Delville Wood advanced
to the attack. The German guns opened in reply and a storm of shells pounded the British trenches.
For yet another hour the officers and men of the 2nd Worcestershire crouched under cover; their
time was not yet come. At last (6.45 p.m.) the moment fixed for the assault arrived. The company
officers blew their whistles and scrambled up " over the top." Like a pack of hounds their men
streamed out after them, shook out into line and advanced up the slope into the smoke and flame
in front.
The Worcestershire platoons poured forward unchecked over the first German line—the enemy's
new trench—capturing or killing such as survived of its defenders. Close to the curtain of bursting
shells (b)the troops plunged on over heavy ground, officers and men holding themselves in hand for
the assault on " Tea Trench," the main enemy position. But that trench had been so shattered
by the bombardment that its site was not recognised. The platoons passed right over the trench
unawares, and sent back a message (c)when the barrage checked that the shells were holding them
up short of their objective. Presently the mistake was realised and the consolidation of the captured
position was begun.
The right company of the Battalion had reached the road junction north of Delville Wood.
They were on the down slope of the ridge and they could see in front of them the villages of Flers
and Gueudecourt with open country beyond. The thrill of victory ran through all—it seemed
so easy to break right through.
As darkness fell the enemy counter-attacked in Delville Wood. Presently it became clear
that the troops of the 14th Division in the Wood on the right were being driven back. The situation
was reported (d), and an urgent message came that on no account was the Battalion to fall back
and that a strong defensive flank was to be formed along the Flers—Longueval road. Captain
W. Ferguson, the commander of the right flank company, organised his position as a sharp salient
with its point at the road junction, and sent detachments into the Wood to assist the 14th Division (e);
but no touch with the latter could, be gained.
All night, amid continuous shell-fire, the Worcestershire companies worked hard to strengthen
the position gained. Before dawn the 1st Middlesex came up to take over the line, and company
by company the 2nd Worcestershire withdrew (/). In the reserve trenches the companies found
food and rested till 5 p.m. Then, their places taken by fresh troops, the companies proceeded
independently to Fricourt. There the Battalion assembled and, with drums beating, marched


(a) During August 23rd-25th the 2nd Worcestershire were commanded by Major J. F. Leman, Lieut.-Colonel Pardoe
being back in the transport lines. Captains E. Lattey and E. S. Aplin rejoined the Battalion as it moved
up for the attack. Both were much distinguished in the battle.
(b) At least one company passed through our barrage, and had to move in front of it.
(c) Received by Brigade at'7.42 p.m. (d) Received by Brigade at 9.31p.m.
(e) Captain Ferguson was wounded, but remained in command. He was awarded the M.C. Private H. C. Spencer
of the Battalion, attached to the Brigade Trench Mortar Battery, was awarded the D.C.M. for bravery during
this battle. During the bombardment he heard the striker of one of his bombs accidently fly off. He instantly
seized the bomb and threw it out of the emplacement just before it burst.
(/) The last platoon left the front line about 7 a.m.


back triumphantly to bivouac west of Becourt (a). All ranks were in high spirits. They had " done
their job " thoroughly, and had wiped out any possible slur from the previous episode. The Glasgow
Highlanders were the first to congratulate.them after the fight.

 

Casualties 2nd Worcestershire, 24th August:—8 officers (Lt. F. W. (a) Couran-Smith and 2/Lt. T. N. Wilmot died
of wounds. Wounded—Capt. W. Ferguson, Capt. E. Lattey, 2/Lt, L. R. Tilling, Lieut. H. G. L. Ward, Lieut.
R. F. Dunnett, 2/Lt. B. G. T. Hawkes) and 141 N.C.O's. and men.
Total casualties 2nd Worcestershire, 6th-26th August—11 officers, 46 N.C.O's., 302 privates.


The Battalion lay in bivouac till August 29th resting, cleaning up, and receiving congratulatory
messages. Then the 33rd Division moved back out of the line and the 2nd Worcestershire marched
westwards to billets in Ribemont.

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