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stephen p nunn

Canada Farm dressing station

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stephen p nunn

Hi all.

 

For many years now I have been interested in the CWGC Canada Farm Cemetery. According to the CWGC site it "took its name from a farmhouse used as a dressing station during the 1917 Allied offensive on this front. Most of the burials are of men who died at the dressing station between June and October 1917".

Although I have (and continue) to research the individual burials, I know very little more about the original dressing station. Does anyone know where it was in relation to the cemetery, what it looked like, anything about its activities - anything really?

 

Thank you for your help.

 

Regards.

Stephen ("Maldon").
 

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clk

Hi Stephen,

 

Hopefully this link will open up with Canada Farm in square 18a. The transparency slider will enable you to see how it fits into the modern landscape.

 

Regards

Chris

 

Edit: Ancestry hits using 'Canada Farm' as a keyword. It might also be worth looking at the diary of Divisional ADMS associated with the Field Ambulances

Edited by clk

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stephen p nunn

Thank you very much clk. The map is really good.

Edited by stephen p nunn

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stephen p nunn

Does anyone have any images of what the Canada Farm ADS looked like please?

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stephen p nunn

I take it that the ADS was in the area of the farmhouse opposite the CWGC and up the track?

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Aurel Sercu

Yes, I have a drawing.

5 July 1917. Let me know (PM or e-mail) if you want it.

 

Aurel, switching off PC now, and tomorrow (Tuesday) away all day....   :-)  and  :-(

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stephen p nunn

Many thanks Aurel - have sent you a message.

Best wishes.

Stephen.

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stephen p nunn

Just seen a reference to 131 Field Ambulance being at Canada Farm on the 6/8/1917 “to run C.M.D.S.”. Does anyone know anything about 131 FA and what CMDS stands for (presumably something "Dressing Station"?).

Thank you.

Stephen.

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seaJane

Canadian Mobile Dressing Station?

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stephen p nunn

Ah seaJane - I think you have it. Thank you.

Stephen.

 

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clk

Hi,

 

I'd tend to go with the possibility of Corps Main Dressing Station.

 

Regards

Chris

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seaJane

I think Chris is right - his answer brings up Google references. The only Google reference my answer brings up is  - mine!

 

sJ

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cbritton

Yes, CMDS is Corps Main Dressing Station. It's in the (very useful) glossary at the end of Via Ypres - the history of the Field Ambulances with the 39th Division.

C

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stephen p nunn

Thank you Chris, sj and C - much appreciated. Aurel has also been incredibly helpful in helping me start to build a picture of this site.

Best regards.

Stephen.

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stephen p nunn

It looks like the following RAMC Field Ambulance units were at Canada Farm:

Number 105 - January 1917.

Number 3 - June 1917.

Number 87 - June/July 1917.

Number 88 - June/July 1917.

Number 4 - June/October 1917.

Number 61 - August/September 1917.

Number 51 - October 1917.

Number 106 - November 1917.

Number 2/3 (Home Counties) - December 1917.

Number 105 - February/March 1918.

Number 2 - April 1918.

 

In addition number RAMC 35 Sanitary Section was there in November/December 1917.

 

There were also Infantry Regiments in the area:

59 Infantry Brigade HQ - July 1917.

RE 55 & 76 Field Co. & Div. Signal Co. - July 1917.

KRRC 10 & 11 Batt. - July/August 1917.

RB 10 Batt. - July/August 1917.

MGC - September 1917.

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Tooold
On 25/08/2017 at 20:05, stephen p nunn said:

It looks like the following RAMC Field Ambulance units were at Canada Farm:

Number 105 - January 1917.

Number 3 - June 1917.

Number 87 - June/July 1917.

Number 88 - June/July 1917.

Number 4 - June/October 1917.

Number 61 - August/September 1917.

Number 51 - October 1917.

Number 106 - November 1917.

Number 2/3 (Home Counties) - December 1917.

Number 105 - February/March 1918.

Number 2 - April 1918.

 

In addition number RAMC 35 Sanitary Section was there in November/December 1917.

 

There were also Infantry Regiments in the area:

59 Infantry Brigade HQ - July 1917.

RE 55 & 76 Field Co. & Div. Signal Co. - July 1917.

KRRC 10 & 11 Batt. - July/August 1917.

RB 10 Batt. - July/August 1917.

MGC - September 1917.

If the info above is correct how come several Welsh Guards are buried at Canada Farm and died at the similar time? 

 

Not saying you are wrong, just trying to work out from the Maps above and the info I have from the Welsh Guards what went on.  

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clk

Hi Tooold,

 

It looks like of the 29 named Welsh Guards men buried there they all were serving with the 1st Battalion, and died between July and September 1917. It would be worth cross referencing against the battalion war diary to see where they were based at the time, and what they were up to. I'd also tend to look at the diary for the Assistant Director Medical Services, Guards Division for the time to see if it gives an evacuation chain. My guess would be that they were wounded elsewhere, but passed away in the medical facilities at Canada Farm, and were buried there.

 

Regards

Chris

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clk

Just seen your other post in this thread. For me 'shot gun' postings are really annoying

Edited by clk

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Aurel Sercu

It just happens that this afternoon I will be visiting Canada Farm Cemetery with a British family, paying our respect to a man I did research on in 2005: 2/Lt. Christopher Tennant. He was buried there on 3 Sept. 1917 tomorrow will be 100 years ago), after he was killed (shell) at dawn at Langemark (between Cannes Farm and Wijdendrift (= road Langemark to Bikschote).

 

Aurel

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Tooold
12 hours ago, clk said:

Hi Tooold,

 

It looks like of the 29 named Welsh Guards men buried there they all were serving with the 1st Battalion, and died between July and September 1917. It would be worth cross referencing against the battalion war diary to see where they were based at the time, and what they were up to. I'd also tend to look at the diary for the Assistant Director Medical Services, Guards Division for the time to see if it gives an evacuation chain. My guess would be that they were wounded elsewhere, but passed away in the medical facilities at Canada Farm, and were buried there.

 

Regards

Chris

 

Thank you for your prompt reply and info. 

 

Sorry about the 'shot gun' approach. It is my first time doing this sort of research. 

 

My apologies to the original poster if I have damaged his thread. 

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TEW

Tooold,

 

The 29 men of the 1st Welsh Guards buried at Canada Farm Cemetery died between 5th July 1917 and 20th Sept 1917.

From the list provided by Stephen No. 4 Field Ambulance were manning Canada Farm dressing station at that time.

No. 4 Field Ambulance were one of the divisional field ambulances for the Guards Division including the 1st Welsh Guards. So it makes perfect sense for them to be taken to a dressing station manned by 'their own' field ambulance.

 

As it was a Corps Main Dressing Station that means men from various divisions from XIV corps (including the Guards) could find their way there. Sometimes specific types of injury EG abdominal would be sent to a different location than say a head wound.

 

As CLK says, if you look through the diaires for No. 4 FA & Guards ADMS you'll probably see orders that define where injured men were to be evacuated to, how they got there etc.

 

A quick look at the Guards ADMS diary for the period shows a few changes to the arrangements just for July 1917. An order dated 8/7/1917 shows;

Bearer Division No. 3 FA at the CMDS Canada Farm.

Bearer Division No. 4 FA at the CMDS Canada Farm.

Tent Division No. 3 FA at the CMDS Canada Farm.

1 Tent Sub-Division of No. 4 FA at the Corps Sick Collecting Station, Canada Farm.

 

After zero hour (not defined) lying cases were sent to the ADS at BOESINGE then to CANADA FARM. Sick were sent to the Corps Sick Collecting Station at CANADA Farm.

 

From the above it seems that No. 3 FA were actually manning the CMDS in early July 1917 with No. 4 FA acting as bearers and manning a seperate Corps Sick Collecting Station. Both 3 & 4 FAs were Guards Division.

 

TEW

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