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Remembered Today:

Ordinary Seaman William George Wyatt - why invalided?


alf mcm
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 William George Wyatt enlisted as J26589 Boy, Second Class in 1913. He was invalided as an Ordinary Seaman on 22nd June 1916, and was awarded a Silver War Badge on 20th October 1916. Is there any way of knowing why he was invalided from the Navy?

 

Regards,

 

Alf McM

Edited by alf mcm
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 After 'invalided' it says 'Plymouth, then something which I can't read.

Hospital ?

 

Ray

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I was hoping the hospital muster books for Plymouth in ADM 102 might help but they are only held till the 1890s.

 

I suppose there's no sign of your man joining the Navy again later? If after 1925 his records will still be with thr MOD if I recall correctly.

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I doubt that the precise reason for his invaliding is to be found in surviving records. However, it is of note that his final assessment of ability as an ordinary seaman at the end of 1915 saw a marked downgrade from "Sat[isfactory]'" to "Inf[erior]" (= Inefficient in substantive rating - although he had only held that rating for one month) - as low as it could go. Oddly, his final ability assessment from HMS VIVID, six months later, was "Superior" (= above average). 

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Thanks to you both.

 

  Seajane, I'm not sure if he went back to the Royal Navy. His father was a Merchant Seaman, so he may have joined the merchant service. In 1939 he was a Petrol Trolley Bus Driver.

 

 Horatio,

 I did think his ability ratings were a bit odd. Abig leap from inferior to superior.

 

  It seems then that there is no way of finding out why he was invalided. The Silver War Badge Roll doesn't give any clues.

 

Regards,

 

Alf McM

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4 hours ago, alf mcm said:

His father was a Merchant Seaman, so he may have joined the merchant service.

 

I can't find him in the BT listings, Alf, so it looks as if not.

 

I suppose you definitely are looking for the Bristol man born 1897? There are eight other William George Wyatts in ADM, although two of them were probably too young to serve.

 

sJ

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Thanks sJ,

  I looked at the BT records as well after I made my last post, and I couldn't find him either.

  Yes, I am defenitely looking for William George Wyatt born in Bristol on 4th December 1897.

 

Regards,

 

Alf McM

 

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The majority of the service records I have looked at 

show T B (Pulmonary tuberculosis) as the number one reason for being discharged (invalided out) of the Navy

T B  a highly infectious and contagious disease  easy spread in the confines of ships

I believe there was no cure at the time

 

Maybe others would like to comment on this

 

 

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Copied this from a post I made a while back (2014!) regarding TB -

 

"As it happens, the introduction of ironclads to the RN led to a distinct rise in cases of TB, probably because the use of watertight iron generated a condensation problem thanks to the limited circulation of air. As a result, the germs tended to stay concentrated in the areas where crew slept and ate, instead of being dispersed."

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