Jump to content
Great War Forum

Remembered Today:

Sign in to follow this  
ianw

Favourite Gravestone Inscription

Recommended Posts

QMan9193

On Pte Ingham, Manchester Regt. headstone.

"Shot at Dawn"

Brave words ffrom his family.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Muerrisch

Inscriptions: I have a very substantial collection for all ranks, Second Battalion Royal Welch Fusiliers in France and Flanders, together with a note of with/without cross. And very many photographs of same.

I would be happy to field queries for specific soldiers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Soren

Hello All,

This is a really a great thread that I often have often thought about myself... at Bedford House:

'Dad's Best Pal'

I have the photo somewhere and will post it......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BatterySergeantMajor
A recall reading a touching epitaph in Laffin's book, which was from the mother of an Australian soldier upset due to the distance she was from her son's grave, knowing she would never be able to travel to see it.

The epitaph was asking if some Mother who was passing her son's grave could pray over it as she would never be able to.

Laffin's book makes many examples of 'the tyranny of distance' making it into the Australian epitaphs.

Regards

Andrew

The epitaph is on the grave of Pte PALMER(1/4th Leicesters), on Foncquevillers Military Cemetery, far north in the Somme area. It asks: "Will some kind kind hand in a foreign land place a flower on my son's grave". I had a picture of the grave, but it is gone due to a hard disk crash. And yes, I did place some flowers on the grave.

Another interesting (and actual?) one is on the headstone of 2nd Lt. Arthur Conway YOUNG, Royal Irish Fusiliers on Tyne Cot: "he died for the fallacy that war can end a war" (maybe some slight difference in the text, I qoute from my memory). He was born in Kobe, Japan and the sparse information I found learned that he was the son of the editor of the "Japan Chronicle", who was befriended with Bertrand Russel.

Erwin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Michelle Young

I can't remeber the exact inscription, but in Point 110 new Cemetery on the grave of Sgt W Harris, Royal Warwicks, it says something like "from wife Nell and Baby Frank and Billie"

Also on the grave of Raymond Asquith "small time but in that small most greatly lived this star of England."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fred van Woerkom

Polygon Wood, Ypres

The most moving inscription is that taken from a man's letter home. It is in Poygon Wood. It reads:

I am all right, mother. Cheerio.

Regards,

Fred

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mat McLachlan

The epitaphs that touch me the most are the ones written by Australian families that reflect the distance between Australia and France and the fact that the families will never be able to visit the grave. Some examples (quoted from memory so please forgive slight errors):

Would some mother passing on, stop and pray for my dear son.

The ships came back with honoured brave, but none came back with our dear Dave.

Somewhere in France he is sleeping, the son I love so well.

Some heart-wrenchers:

Would God that I had died for thee, my son, my son.

Gone, and the light of all our lives gone with him.

The days we spent together are as a string of pearls to me.

Finally, a poignant inscription.

I must go, I am ashamed to be seen without a soldier's uniform. This was the explanation given by a soldier to his mother about why he was enlisting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Andrew P
The ships came back with honoured brave, but none came back with our dear Dave.

Finally, a poignant inscription.

I must go, I am ashamed to be seen without a soldier's uniform. This was the explanation given by a soldier to his mother about why he was enlisting.

2 of my favourite ones Mat.

The epitaphs on Australian & NZ graves at Gallipoli can be read at

http://www.anzacs.org

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
frev

A few of the many Australian epitaphs that I find quite moving:

You died for us, shall we not live for you?

Given by a loving father and mother with proud but aching hearts.

He is just away, he has wandered into an unknown land.

His name is written in letters of gold in hearts he left at home.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fred van Woerkom

I'm All Right, Mother. Cheerio.

In an earlier posting I wrote that this moving inscription is to be found in Polygon Wood. It is, of course, but Aurel Sercu, kind teacher that he is, pointed out that it is the Buttes New British Cemetery. He was unaware of the existence of the inscription, however, so we were glad we could show him something that he did not know.

Lyn Macdonald told us the story of the quotation from the letter that the Australian lieutenant was planning to send home on a tour of the Salient with a British party in 1981. She was substituting for Rose Coombs, so she may have been using her own notes or those of Miss Coombs.

The gravestone can easily be found : it is in the 9th or 10th row from the entrance.

Regards,

Fred

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Soren
Hello All,

This is a really a great thread that I often have often thought about myself... at Bedford House:

'Dad's Best Pal'

I have the photo somewhere and will post it......

Photo, with inscription:

A/394 RIFLEMAN

M.H. RIDE

KING'S ROYAL RIFLE CORPS

30TH SEPTEMBER 1915 AGE 19

'DAD'S BEST PAL'

post-19-1104841142.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
spike10764

One I spotted at Dalston Road Cemetery Carlisle- due to the name

post-19-1104876445.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
southafricawargraves

My personal favorite after walking past and paying respects to thousands of the war dead.

Name: HILLS, ALFRED GEORGE

Initials: A G J

Nationality: United Kingdom

Rank: Gunner

Regiment: Royal Artillery

Unit Text: 11 Field Regt.

Age: 25

Date of Death: 31/08/1942

Service No: 972030

Additional information: Son of Alfred and Ada Hills, of Wood Green, Middlesex; husband of Irene M. Hills, of Wood Green.

Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead

Grave/Memorial Reference: XXI. F. 14.

Cemetery: EL ALAMEIN WAR CEMETERY

Inscription - "Terry's Daddy" , put's a lump in my throat every time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bobpike

A thought-provoking one!

Sgt. P J Ball MM 44th. AIF 28.3.18 - Villers-Bretonneux MC

"I fought & died in the Great War to end all wars have I died in vain?"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Soren
A thought-provoking one!

Sgt. P J Ball MM 44th. AIF 28.3.18 - Villers-Bretonneux MC

"I fought & died in the Great War to end all wars have I died in vain?"

That can't be real inscription..... can it? :huh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bobpike

Soren,

I'm afraid it is, I have the photo in front of me. If you want a copy I'll gladly e-mail you it, but as I can't get the hang of posting photos on the forum, I need your address,

Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
salientguide

"He saw beyond the filth of battle and thought death a fair price to pay to belong to the company of these fellows. "

2nd Lt William Stanhope Forbes 1st DoCLI KIA 3/9/16. Guillemont Rd Cemetery

The Somme. Son of Stanhope Alexander Forbes one of the Newlyn school of art founders and Royal Academy member. A fine expression of the spirit of Kitcheners Army.

Also found on many graves tucked away usually in odd corners of many cemeteries. a memorial to men signed up half a wotld away and shipped tp the western front to labour in the cause, the Chinese Labour Cops

" A good name endures forever."

SG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BeppoSapone
Not a gravestone inscription, but worth mentioning is the following In Memoriam notice for William Bruce 2/1 Bucks Battalion.

" How went the day? We died and never knew, but - well or ill - England, we died for you."

Inspired by John Maxwell Edmonds:

'Went the Day Well? We died and never knew, But well or ill, For freedom we died for you,".

Went the Day Well? was also the title of a WW2 film about a fictional German occupation of the village of Bramley Green.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Matt Dixon

He would give his dinner to a hungry dog and go without himself.

Gunner C D Moore, Canadian Artillery, Petit Vimy cemetery

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Myrtle

"Tread softly and doff thy cap for such as he stopped the gap."

Sapper John Rees Davies 343rd Road Construction Coy. Royal Engineers Died of Wounds 8th August 1917 aged 39 - Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Andrew P
Soren,

I'm afraid it is, I have the photo in front of me. If you want a copy I'll gladly e-mail you it, but as I can't get the hang of posting photos on the forum, I need your address,

Bob

Hi Bob

Sergeant Phillip James Ball MM is a soldier I'm researching so would be grateful of a copy of the grave photo if posible.

The following is the info I have on him

No.470 - Sgt Phillip James Ball MM - KIA 28/03/18 (shot through the head) - Villers Brettoneux Military Cemetery III.E.I - Born Birmingham England & later moved to WA & lived 104 Mandurah Rd South Fremantle - Farmer Age 21 - Enlisted 24/01/16 - Next of Kin - (Father) George Ball of Birmingham England.

Hope the kelly brothers photo got through to you ok.

Cheers

Andrew

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bobpike

Andrew, They did & very many thanks. Ball's gravestone photo sent this morning, please let me know that you get it,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Terry Carter

The photo below is not a headstone inscription but I found it quite moving when I saw it in Lapugnoy Cemetery, near Bethune, last October.

It was placed at the grave of Sgt T Holmshaw R.E. who was killed on 16 June 1917.

Terry

post-19-1105368641.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Soren

This one is at the cemetery just opposite Hyde Park Corner in Belgium, next to the 16 year old, Pte Condon? I did not note the soldiers name but the inscription reads:

Each night the moon shines upon your grave,

the one one we loved but could not save.

Now that one had bee in tears...... :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Soren
Mother Shiptons amazing prophecy.

If she was so good, then why weren't we warned about Blair? :rolleyes:

If clairvoyants are all that why do you have to book appointments with them? :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...