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Remembered Today:

"The Kitchen is the Key to Victory"


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Fantastic pics mate. Where did you get them? Makes one wonder what they meant re the relationship between eating less bread and winning the war.

That must have been mighty special bread they sent to the troops. :P

Robbie

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Hi Robbie

an internet search on 'great war recruitment posters' will you give a lot of sites which have poster and post card images.

I save them as I find them, sometimes I find a better image of one I already have.

Be careful to differentiate between different nationality images and also WW1 vs WW2 images.

Regards

Richard

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Terrific mate. I'd love some original postcards just like these.

Robbie

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These "war menus" were published weekly in the "Women's Section" - one page.

There was quite a push at the time in Toronto to encourage women to do their own home baking to conserve. Before I began reading these accounts, I had the impression that women at the time were home cooking/cleaning, but, from what I've seen, at least in a big city, middle class women bought their bread and baked goods, sent out their laundry, plus had cooks and servants. In fact, there was a plan to start cooking classes to teach home baking and economy during the war years.

There were also many articles encouraging frugality at home. There were also reader complaints, usually anonymous, that indicated that some women didn't like the idea that women receiving a separation allowance were not conserving. Naturally, those receiving the allowance stated their case, but the early reaction to this first form of social assistance was mainly negative. There was a lot of poverty in the city, but this was handled, not always successfully, by voluntary donations, church groups, etc. So it seemed that "busy body" types eyed the soldier's wives - and analyzed their spending and household habits.

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this is the stuff!

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and another

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and another

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A period 'Punch' magazine cartoon

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and another

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and another commenting on rationing in February 1918

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