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Remembered Today:

Chocolate Box (W.Indies) Need help


Khaki

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What information can anyone provide about the above chocolate box supplied to the army & navy in the GW, much is known about the brass gift tin, but what about the black painted one from the West Indies, what were the numbers, contents, distribution etc?

 

thanks if you can help

 

khaki

Edited by Khaki
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I have one with the contents - chocolate.  Pretty heavy when full, too!!

Not come across any research like there is for the Princess Mary tin, though.

Sorry.

James

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found an image here

and at IWM

Edited by jonbem
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I found these details

World War One soldier's chocolate tin. The tin has a black background with gold images/lettering. The top of the tin bears the crests of the British Colonies Trinidad, Granada and St. Lucia. In gold print "THE GIFT OF THE COLONIES OF TRINIDAD GRENADA & ST. LUCIA TO HIS MAJESTY'S NAVAL & MILITARY FORCES". Also "THIS CHOCOLATE IS MADE FROM COCOA GROWN IN TRINIDAD GRENADA & ST. LUCIA". On the bottom of the tin the manufacture's details are printed "B.W. & M. LTD. MANSFIELD, ENG". (This stands for Barringer Wallis & Manners Ltd). Internally the tin has a gilt finish.

 
Weight: 159.9 gm. Dimensions: 230 mm x 100 mm x 28 mm. 
 
History: Between 1914 and 1918 the Caribbean island of Trinidad & Tobago donated around £480,000 worth of money and goods - over half of the country's revenue. In October 1914 the colony authorities voted to spend £40,820 on cocoa, to be used in chocolate manufacturing in England.
 
Along with the islands of Grenada and St. Lucia, Trinidad's  cocoa was used to make chocolate which was sent as a gift in a special tin to Allied troops in France. The tin was manufactured by Barringer Wallis & Manners Ltd. The tin provides a link to an often overlooked area of First World War history: the support Britain Received from its overseas Empire during the conflict.
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Thanks James and Jonbem,

Yes that's the one , fantastic James that you have a full one, would love to see a photo of the contents if possible, great research info Jonbem, shame that this is  relatively unexplored territory.

 

cheers

:thumbsup:

khaki

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Khaki,

Photos attached, showing the Cadbury's chocolate contents.  Also the base of another tin that has been painted by/for a chap in the RAMC as a gift to his family in 1917...

James

TrinidadTin1.jpg

TrinidadTin2.jpg

TrinidadTin3.jpg

Edited by redbarchetta
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Hi James,

Many thanks for your reply and photographs, very interesting, nice personalizing of the base, sorry it has taken a while to answer but I have been away at a militaria show.

regards

khaki

 

 

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  • 3 years later...
On 04/05/2017 at 22:05, jonbem said:

I found these details

World War One soldier's chocolate tin. The tin has a black background with gold images/lettering. The top of the tin bears the crests of the British Colonies Trinidad, Granada and St. Lucia. In gold print "THE GIFT OF THE COLONIES OF TRINIDAD GRENADA & ST. LUCIA TO HIS MAJESTY'S NAVAL & MILITARY FORCES". Also "THIS CHOCOLATE IS MADE FROM COCOA GROWN IN TRINIDAD GRENADA & ST. LUCIA". On the bottom of the tin the manufacture's details are printed "B.W. & M. LTD. MANSFIELD, ENG". (This stands for Barringer Wallis & Manners Ltd). Internally the tin has a gilt finish.

 
Weight: 159.9 gm. Dimensions: 230 mm x 100 mm x 28 mm. 
 
History: Between 1914 and 1918 the Caribbean island of Trinidad & Tobago donated around £480,000 worth of money and goods - over half of the country's revenue. In October 1914 the colony authorities voted to spend £40,820 on cocoa, to be used in chocolate manufacturing in England.
 
Along with the islands of Grenada and St. Lucia, Trinidad's  cocoa was used to make chocolate which was sent as a gift in a special tin to Allied troops in France. The tin was manufactured by Barringer Wallis & Manners Ltd. The tin provides a link to an often overlooked area of First World War history: the support Britain Received from its overseas Empire during the conflict.

 

So glad I found this post! This is my great grandfathers tin and it has his war medals along with my grandfathers war medals in, and is a much treasured item but I hadn't had time to look at the tin until now!

Grandads-Tin-I-think-was-stanleys.jpg

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