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Remembered Today:

Pte George Frederick Fordham in ASC


researchingreg

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I am trying to find out about Army Service Corps Pte George Frederick Fordham M2/114315 (so he is probably a motor driver/fitter). I have found his MIC, which shows he entered France 8 August 1915 and his medals, however he also is shown to have a SWB, so was probably discharged due to sickness or wounds before the end of the war. I think he may be my great uncle George Frederick Fordham born 1880 in Newmarket. But I have not found any Army Service or pension record yet. Does anybody have any information on the ASC unit he was in or other info.

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must be this chap

First name(s) Geo Fredk
Last name Fordham
Service number M2/114315
Rank Private
Badge number 4224
Enlistment date 22-Jun-1915
Discharge date 01-Jan-1916
Regiment/unit A.S.C. (M.T.)
Cause of discharge Tuberculosis of Lung 392 (xvi)
Whether served overseas Yes
Badge date of issue 09-Oct-1916
Record set Silver War Badge Roll 1914-1920
Category Military, armed forces & conflict
Subcategory First World War
Collections from Great Britain
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I can't find any surviving service records on Ancestry.

I suppose they may be one of the majority lost during the Blitz.

So I'm afraid that the chances of getting any detailed indication of where he served are looking remote at this point.

It might be possible to cross reference the  embarkation dates for various ASC units, that could give a lead.

 

 

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6 minutes ago, Dai Bach y Sowldiwr said:

I can't find any surviving service records on Ancestry.

I suppose they may be one of the majority lost during the Blitz.

So I'm afraid that the chances of getting any detailed indication of where he served are looking remote at this point.

It might be possible to cross reference the  embarkation dates for various ASC units, that could give a lead.

 

 

needle, haystack?

At peak, the ASC numbered an incredible 10,547 officers and 315,334 men

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Thanks everybody I think Jonbem is right it is a needle in a haystack, however I have traced a soldier through the embarkation date before who was in the Northumberland Fusiliers and found him mentioned in the War Diaries of the unit, when he was wounded.

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one thing that may help is the short timescale, less than 6 months total service.

If you look at the remarks on the medal card

"Dis 392 XVI" it should relate to "King’s Regulations 392 (xvi) No longer physically fit for war service"

see http://www.1914-1918.net/soldiers/swbrecords.html

and

http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/soldiers/a-soldiers-life-1914-1918/the-evacuation-chain-for-wounded-and-sick-soldiers/classification-of-wounds-using-by-the-british-army-in-the-first-world-war/

 

I reckon the next step has to be checking diaries to see which ASC Company arrived in France on the given date.

ASC Company numbers on

http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/regiments-and-corps/the-army-service-corps-in-the-first-world-war/army-service-corps-mechanical-transport-companies/

Edited by jonbem
added another link
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ok

this may be a bit of a long shoot giving a lucky hit.

In the usual search engine pages  I looked for......

Landed in France 8 August 1915, Arrived in France 8 August 1915, Disembarked in France 8 August 1915

the only suitable response was for

The Gloucestershire Regiment
10th (Service) Battalion
Landed in France 8 August 1915.
17 August 1915 : transferred to 1st Brigade in 1st Division

 

so that may help

regards

Jon

 

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Michael Young's book lists the dates of formation of many ASC companies, but not their dates of embarkation.

 

And we also do not know whether:

1) he embarked with his company who were also entering France for the first time, or

2) he embarked as part of a HAMT (Heavy Artillery MT)- We don't know whattype of driver he was-lorry, caterpillar, car etc.

3)he embarked as a general draft of unrelated ASC men who would be allocated units on arrival in France.

4) whether the company was formed in France after embarkation.

 

I don't have a list of embarkation  dates for ASC companies, nor what units of the British Army embarked for France on that date.

Until those can be cross referenced, then we can't narrow down what company of the ASC he was in.

I don't know if some ASC companies were formed in France after embarkation, so all you can do at the moment is exclude all ASC companies formed after August 1915 say.

All but about 8 of the companies numbered 500 to 1132 were formed after  September 1st 1915, so I think all you can say that he would probably been initially in an ASC company numbered 1-499.

But that's ll you can say.

We don't know if he stayed in the same company during his time in France, or whether he was transferred to other companies.

 

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I think this may be his younger brother Pte Thomas William Fordham DM2/196474 ASC born 16 Feb 1883 in Newmarket and was married to Emily Annie Webb 27 May 1906 and had 3 children by 1914. Another younger brother Pte Percy John Fordham 1077 was a conscientious objector and was in the Eastern non-combatant Corps, I have found his Army record and it mentions he said he the ASC was the only Army unit he would consider (I suppose because his older brothers were in it).

 

Thomas William Fordham's MIC gives no clue as to where he went in WW1, much less info than George Frederick Fordham.

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There was an older brother Albert born 1873 or birth registered second quarter rather. Few possible MICs for him but anyone's guess at the mo if he served or not. There is an Albert J MIC for the ASC. NB Geo Frederick has a birth reg in the final quarter of 1879 so birth year not 1880

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18 hours ago, Mark1959 said:

There was an older brother Albert born 1873 or birth registered second quarter rather. Few possible MICs for him but anyone's guess at the mo if he served or not. There is an Albert J MIC for the ASC. NB Geo Frederick has a birth reg in the final quarter of 1879 so birth year not 1880

I thought my great uncle Albert who was born 29 Mar 1873 in Colchester, was 41 at the start of ww1 and may have been too old to be in the Army unless he volunteered and I don't know his second name if he had one, although I do have a 2nd great uncle Jesse Lambourne who joined up in 1915 at the age of 47, so he could well have been in the Army. Also thanks for the info on George Frederick Fordham as I don;t have a date for his birth.

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  • 1 year later...

Hi Geoff,

I have found a service record with a very similar profile to George Frederick Fordham which might help.

M2/114091 Private Thomas Shepherdson, Army Service Corps born 1879 and enlisted 19 June 1915 and left for France 8 August 1915 from Southampton on the ’Princess Victoria’ as part of the 3rd Army Troops Supply Column. Disembarked at Rouen 9 August 1915 and joined 371 Company ASC MT.

Regards

Mark

p1.jpg

p2.jpg

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1 hour ago, mhifle said:

I have found a service record with a very similar profile to George Frederick Fordham which might help.

That's an interesting find Mark, in that it gives an ASC MT Company along with its date of arrival in France.

(Also interesting for me, as my GF crossed over on the SS. Victoria, albeit Folkestone to Boulogne in Febrary 1917).

It might be reasonable to assume that  George Fordham arrived in France on this ship and may have also ended up in 371MT Coy ASC.

Realistically though, I think that's as much that can be deduced from this record.

A quick look at Thomas Shepherdson's movements later in his record, reveals many movements, at least 12 excluding hospital admissions.

There is no guarantee whatsoever that George Fordham's movements would have resembled, let alone exactly copied Thomas Shepherdson's movements.

Still we have a quite strong suggestion of his first company.

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