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Remembered Today:

Field Ambulance - where did it start and end?


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Did the responsibility of the Field Ambulance start when it's stretcher bearers picked up a man to when he was dropped off at the ADS or was it more/less than that - e.g. was the FA responsible until the man reached a CCS?

 

I am trying to work out where a wounded Pioneer might have been buried who records show died with a FA.

 

Many thanks

 

Neil

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As a simple answer I'd say no.

 

Technically, a FA might only take wounded from an RAP to either a MDS or ADS or relay post or collecting post or to CCS. There may even be a series of relay posts due to craters in the road. Each manned by a different FA.

 

If this is during an allied offensive then the DMS may issue orders (via the DDMS & ADMS) regarding how to make entries in the Admin and Discharge books in order to prevent a man having to be admitted and discharged from each book along the route of evacuation.

 

It would be possible for a man to be admitted to a series of FAs during evacuation and not show up on paper other than at the start and end of the evacuation trail.

 

Depending on the DMS instructions a man succumbing during evacuation may just be 'discharged dead' from the original FA which may not be the one he was actually with at the time. I doubt such a man would be admitted to MDS or CCS as dead. Although they occasionally mention men 'brought in dead' in diaries.

 

If you want to give more details - name, number, date, division I could see what is available.

TEW

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Many thanks

 

The man involved is Private Norman Thomas Trethewey (1Bn Australian Pioneers) who was admitted wounded to 2nd Australian Field Ambulance on 28 October 1917 and recorded as died with them on 30 October. I assume from the time delay that he would have died at ADS and would not have made it to the CCS - is that a fair assumption?

 

I know the 2nd Aus FA took over from the 13th Aus FA and were evacuating men down the Zonnebeke Road to an ADS in Ypres not far from the Prison.

 

Neil

Edited by Neil Mackenzie
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Neil.

Looks as though you've seen 2nd Aus FA diary? One would think if he made it back to the Remy Group of CCSs and died there his grave would be known (unless air-raids & shelling destroyed graves there).

 

Their evacuation map shows the sections operated by bearers, horse & motor wagons from the Zonnebeck RAP to the Ypres ADS. From the Ypres ADS it looks as if they went to Ypres entraining centre for transport to CCS.

 

There is a Standing Orders 1/10/1917 which has a list of those wounded who can be unloaded which includes those that could stand the journey to CCS. Re-dressing, splinting and badly gassed cases could be unloaded.

 

They refer to Corps Medical Arrangments No.5 which should be in 1 ANZAC Dairy but I can only see No. 6. Lots of other evacuation details.

TEW

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Thanks TEW

From what I could tell from the War Diary the ADS was in the same place or next to the Entraining Centre - is that how you read it as well?

 

I am guessing he was buried in Ypres Reservoir Cemetery.

 

Neil

Edited by Neil Mackenzie
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Yes, the two places must have been set up that way to keep things moving along.

 

As to which cemetery?

TEW

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