Jump to content
Great War Forum

Remembered Today:

What is a CRS


Recommended Posts

My first look at a War diary for a Field ambulance (91) and I am puzzled by an abbreviation.  It's C.R.S..

Is this a "Camp Reception Station" and if so how did it fit in the chain of evacuation and what did it consist of please?

 

CRS.JPG

 

Many Thanks

Peter

Edited by petwes
Meant to type "Station" instead of original word "Centre"
Link to post
Share on other sites

Casualty Reception Centre after Casualty Clearing Station? It looks to me as if some are being passed farther into the hospital network and some are being cleared for duty.

Edited by seaJane
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the reply Seajane; I have just edited the post as I meant to type Camp Reception Station which is the phrase I found from a Google.

Your interpretation makes more sense.

Peter

Edited by petwes
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not 100% sure but it does seem to make sense.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I would suggest CORPS Rest Station .  This was a station operated by one of the Field Ambulances to tend to fatigued or slightly wounded men who would be returned to their units within a week or so.  It was always better to keep these fellows in the Army area rather than sending them back to Base, from where they might be lost to their units for a considerable time.

 

I think that originally each Division had its own Rest Station, but later on one per Corps seemed adequate.  Of course, this may not have been the case here, whereupon please forget I said anything!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I was reading a War Diary at Kew last week and found that 53 CCS, based in the Monastery at Mont des Cats, was also called 2nd Army Rest Station for a period of it's existence. It also in it's early stages seemed to be a centre for such as day case ailments.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Admin

The 90 FA diary refers to XV Corps Rest Station as at post 5 

 

As these were gas victims they were probably less affected, however it's clear the FA was overwhelmed. Fascinating report , ' cocaine had no effect',  mustard gas as noted in the report remained in clothes and affected the running of the FA.

 

Ken 

 

Edited by kenf48
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks to all for the recent replies.  Now I know I am looking at a Corps Rest Station I have found quite a few other references to follow up. 

 

Ken

You have obviously looked at the diary, the report on the 26th make interesting reading about what must have been one of the first attacks (22nd July) using Mustard.  It is interesting to compare this with the report earlier in the month about gas victims post 10th July.  As the diary itself points out the symptoms and treatment were different; I assume the earlier casualties had been exposed to Phosgene.

Peter

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...