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Dust Jacket Collector
On 16/02/2017 at 01:10, voltaire60 said:

 

One area that does intrigue me with the literary end of the military memoirs and literary works of the inter-war years-Is there a decent history of the publication of this sort of stuff- in particular, say, the relationship between the military  service of the publishers and who and what they published?? (Along the lines of all the stuff say on inter-war Paris, Cunard,Kahane, Black Sun etc,). The subject of the literary publishers and their own war experiences seems to me to be neglected-yet as the publishers commissioned and financed much of the literary output, their influence-and, in turn, what influenced them must be a tale worth telling

An interesting question, Mike. I've got numerous books discussing War memoirs but as far as I can see none of them address this particular aspect. I suspect most publishers were hard headed business men who would publish whatever they thought would bring them a profit.

Here's a little starter material for your potential PhD on the subject :-

Take the following four memoirs which are generally thought of as being positive about their War experience :

Junger's 'Storm of Steel', published by Chatto

Pollard's 'Fire Eater', published by Hutchinson

Carrington's 'A Subaltern's War', published by Peter Davies & 

Crozier's 'Brass Hat in No-Man's-Land', published by Cape

Those publishers also gave us, respectively;

Aldington's 'Death of a Hero', Haslam's 'Cannon Fodder', Manning's 'Her Privates We' & Gristwood's 'The Somme', which are usually considered as being somewhat 'disillusioned '. You'll probably need to look at the military careers of the commissioning editors as well who may have been younger men than their bosses.

Should keep you occupied for a few years!

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other ranker
1 hour ago, Dust Jacket Collector said:

An interesting question, Mike. I've got numerous books discussing War memoirs but as far as I can see none of them address this particular aspect. I suspect most publishers were hard headed business men who would publish whatever they thought would bring them a profit.

Here's a little starter material for your potential PhD on the subject :-

Take the following four memoirs which are generally thought of as being positive about their War experience :

Junger's 'Storm of Steel', published by Chatto

Pollard's 'Fire Eater', published by Hutchinson

Carrington's 'A Subaltern's War', published by Peter Davies & 

Crozier's 'Brass Hat in No-Man's-Land', published by Cape

Those publishers also gave us, respectively;

Aldington's 'Death of a Hero', Haslam's 'Cannon Fodder', Manning's 'Her Privates We' & Gristwood's 'The Somme', which are usually considered as being somewhat 'disillusioned '. You'll probably need to look at the military careers of the commissioning editors as well who may have been younger men than their bosses.

Should keep you occupied for a few years!

I have an article that I kept from the WFA Stand To! from some time in the year 2000 that was written by Jonathan Walker called 'Breaking the rules' Officers memoirs published 1920-1935. Maybe some one could look it up for Mike. There are many references to the publishers and their Great War experiences in relations to soldier authors, particularly in the reference section.

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Dust Jacket Collector
13 minutes ago, other ranker said:

I have an article that I kept from the WFA Stand To! from some time in the year 2000 that was written by Jonathan Walker called 'Breaking the rules' Officers memoirs published 1920-1935. Maybe some one could look it up for Mike. There are many references to the publishers and their Great War experiences in relations to soldier authors, particularly in the reference section.

Sadly I dumped all my back issues of Stand To when I last moved house (just too much stuff). I'd certainly be keen to read that article. Any chance you could scan it? I've checked the WFA website but I don't think they've digitised their back issues.

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other ranker

DJC,

Just sent it to your email address. Hope you receive it, three pages.

Grant

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Dust Jacket Collector
26 minutes ago, other ranker said:

DJC,

Just sent it to your email address. Hope you receive it, three pages.

Grant

Brilliant. Thank you. Still in the ether at the moment while BT gets its act together.

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David Filsell

Seajane,

Thank you. Apologies for the delay in responding

best regards

David

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voltaire60

DJC- Alan- as you have been outed by the ST in January- Thanks for your suggestions re. publishers of Great War materials. I have just looked up Pleter Davies- to me, a typical inter-war publisher. Surprised to find he was one of the Barrie's "Lost Boys" and closely related to Daphne Du Maurier. Someone (ie an American doctoral student) must have written up something on the post-Great War publishers. Publishers' archives are all over the place (Well,Reading at least)  so I suspect there may be some interesting stuff out there-I think there has been a little too much concentration on the writers, rather than the publishers (Rightly so)-but the war was an all-embracing catastrophe for many and I cannot see that the writers can be considered without reference to the publishers.=the more so given the number who served. peter Davies,for instance, was MC. 

    I hope to be able to pick your  (well-stocked)  brains on this matter from time to time!!

 

               Mike

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voltaire60
On 2/16/2017 at 16:22, MartH said:

Too much talk of buying rare books here, making me jealous.

 

    No-  Finding them is the game. Hope IMBUCASE was not too dull. I did a FOI request on the Cabinet Office- amazingly, responded in 2 days-alas, to say no vols. held.  The series  CAB 103 at TNA looks particularly interesting -and it suggests that the UK Civil Histories -office files, etc-are all at Kew.

   Evacuation from Russia- I am not at all sure that this is an official history- The IWM list it as a "blue book" but I have a strong feeling that it is not-it would show up on other record systems if it was a parliamentary paper. I suspect it is an internal report-but printed up and in blue wrappers. I am wondering if it could be a missing staff appreciation. However, I will have to do battle with the current IWM library arrangements to see it (A grim prospect).

    Robin Winks must have got his reference to "Eastern Siberia" from somewhere- I will try to run that to earth- the likeliest sources are Yale and,perhaps, the Hoover Institution.

   Likewise, doing a little work as a sideline to find out how the Carnegie volumes came about. Don't worry-You have not yet run out of tings to collect!!

PS- The Eastern Siberia volume is looking for all the world as if the Winks' vol. is a mistake-There is an "Eastern Siberia"  published by the Foreign Office in 1919-1920 but part of the "Peace  Handbooks"- the published background books of social,political, materials published for the Peace Conference (equivalent of the Nval Intelligence Division handbooks of WW2)

 

     Best wishes

                   Mike

Edited by voltaire60
Extra info.

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Black Maria
On ‎14‎/‎02‎/‎2017 at 08:59, MartH said:

 

This is a very special book dating from 1915, I don't think it was reprinted, but other books may have its title.  If you have a copy, it's one of the most scarcest great war books. Take care off it!

I see an original copy of 'What to know in Egypt' ( minus original covers but with the map) has just sold on e-bay for £20 to a single bidder . It would seem that, like a lot of original  and scarce Great War books , it is just not that sought after by many people.

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Resurgam13

I was the single bidder for " What to know in Egypt ". There are two annotations in ink in the booklet: "This book will give you some idea of what I saw in Egypt" on page 5, and, "Arrived Abbassia Barracks  Sept. 17 1914" on the folding map, so pre-dating the arrival of the ANZACs.

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other ranker

I hate to see this thread slipping down the list. I bought this book this week. I know GWDJ has it on his site. I am chuffed to find it for £22!

scan0001.jpg

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Dust Jacket Collector
45 minutes ago, other ranker said:

I hate to see this thread slipping down the list. I bought this book this week. I know GWDJ has it on his site. I am chuffed to find it for £22!

 

An excellent buy, OR. The last copy I saw was sold by Harrington's for £650! A lot nicer than the original in it's plain text jacket. I think the image depicts Sassoon winning his MC.

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voltaire60
26 minutes ago, Dust Jacket Collector said:

An excellent buy, OR. The last copy I saw was sold by Harrington's for £650! A lot nicer than the original in it's plain text jacket. I think the image depicts Sassoon winning his MC.

 

   Hookway Cowles will not go down in history  as the greatest of illustrators. Intriguing that he died "Bona Vacantia" in Islington.in 1987.  My favourite illustrated by him  is:

 

Image result for hookway cowles

 

(Thanks to Classic Crime Fiction for the pic.)

 

              A topic popular among many during the Second World War with regard to BLM

Edited by voltaire60

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other ranker

Has anyone seen a 1918 copy of 'The Breaking Of The Storm' by C A L Brownlow for sale in the last ten years? Its been on my want list for 20!

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Dust Jacket Collector
3 hours ago, other ranker said:

Has anyone seen a 1918 copy of 'The Breaking Of The Storm' by C A L Brownlow for sale in the last ten years? Its been on my want list for 20!

There was a copy for sale on eBay until recently. I think the seller was 'Dilapsus' and it was £95 if I recall. Sadly no jacket which I've only ever seen the once. I found it to be an excellent account although some have been less enthused.

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Resurgam13

I wish it had been mine to sell, but sadly not.

 

Kind regards,

Geoffrey

("dilapsus")

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Dust Jacket Collector
30 minutes ago, Resurgam13 said:

I wish it had been mine to sell, but sadly not.

 

Kind regards,

Geoffrey

("dilapsus")

Sorry, Geoff, I was sure it was you. Mind you I often buy a book twice now having forgotten I already have it.

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voltaire60
5 hours ago, Dust Jacket Collector said:

Sorry, Geoff, I was sure it was you. Mind you I often buy a book twice now having forgotten I already have it.

 

       let's hope you do not have that problem with inscribed first editions of Graves/Sassoon and vice versa- It is when one has 2 presentation copies of the same book to the same person that provenance can be a bit tricky.  (Yes, I have seen it done!!)

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barkalotloudly
On 30/07/2017 at 15:44, other ranker said:

Has anyone seen a 1918 copy of 'The Breaking Of The Storm' by C A L Brownlow for sale in the last ten years? Its been on my want list for 20!

i have a copy somewhere, it is the sort of book that should you come across it in a second hand shop i would imagine it would be quite cheap i think i paid about 5.00 for my copy { it is quite a small book blue covers i think, quite thin} certainly not up to Gale Polden standards  

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Cymro

I just bought a nice copy of "How I escaped from Germany" by Lt Walter Duncan. It's been on my wants list for a while but has proved very elusive. At 25 pounds not too expensive either.  Well pleased!

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Dust Jacket Collector

Just back from the Lewes Bookfair. Usually I come away empty handed but today produced this little gem - a 1st edition of Haig's Despatches in it's dust wrapper. Not that unusual you might think but this copy is nicely inscribed by Haig to his publisher J. M. Dent.

59e21986612c2_haigsdespatches-001.jpg.529f007c08f5591d031c5a0a5702dc5d.jpg59e2199c7f6ce_haigtoDent-001.jpg.38b6b42ee455be5e06d51b1f62768484.jpg

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Resurgam13

I've had this battered copy of Haig's "Cavalry Studies : Strategical and Tactical" for some time - it was sold as Haig's personal copy, passed down to his son, but I wish I could be sure!

8433_0001.jpg

8433_0002.jpg

8433_0003.jpg

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Dust Jacket Collector

I think you can be sure it was Haig’s - that ‘DH’ looks authentic to me.

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other ranker

I bought a book called, 'The Gates Of Kut', by Lindsay Russell printed by Cassell in 1917. It is a novel based in Kut at the time of the siege. There is plenty about who the author was on google, but I cannot find a record of one for sale anywhere. I paid £4 for it.

The owner must have been connected to the Kut campaign somehow as there are newspaper clippings of obits of people who were and other articles stuck throughout it. The owner was Hamilton F Duncan LCC. Does anyone know who this is? Have found a gem?

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voltaire60
54 minutes ago, other ranker said:

I bought a book called, 'The Gates Of Kut', by Lindsay Russell printed by Cassell in 1917. It is a novel based in Kut at the time of the siege. There is plenty about who the author was on google, but I cannot find a record of one for sale anywhere. I paid £4 for it.

The owner must have been connected to the Kut campaign somehow as there are newspaper clippings of obits of people who were and other articles stuck throughout it. The owner was Hamilton F Duncan LCC. Does anyone know who this is? Have found a gem?

 

     COPAC identifies the author as "Patricia Ethel Stonehouse", an Australian hack writer of romantic novels, which were bestsellers in their day. Beyond that, it looks like that in turn was one of the pseudonyms she used. The true identity appears to be:   (Taken from Australian Dictionary of Biography online)

Her surviving papers appear to be deposited in the State Library of Victoria.  As to Hamilton Duncan- no real trace-though the use of the letters "LCC" after a name usually indicates that person was an elected member of the former London County Council, though it is possible that he was an officer rather than a member

 

Stonehouse, Ethel Nhill Victoria (1883–1964)

by Suzanne Edgar

This article was published in Australian Dictionary of Biography, Volume 12, (MUP), 1990

Ethel Nhill Victoria Stonehouse (1883-1964), writer, was born on 1 August 1883 at Nhill, Victoria, fourth of twelve children of Robert Stonehouse, blacksmith, and his wife Jane, née Hardingham. Educated until she was 14 at Charlton State School, she claimed to have considered entering a convent. From 1894 Ethel published verse and short stories; she later worked at journalism in Melbourne and joined the Australian Modernist Society of Enlightened Roman Catholics. Her first novel, Smouldering Fires (Melbourne, 1912), concerned the seduction and desertion of a young Catholic woman by a priest. Its controversial theme was to be repeated so often and so violently in her writing as to seem personal and obsessive; she also published the epistolary Love Letters of a Priest (1912).

In London in 1911 she joined the International Modernist Association and the Jeanne d'Arc League; by 1913 she asserted, 'I have only read three books in my life, and have written five'. Stonehouse used pseudonyms, the most frequent being 'Patricia Lindsay Russell'. Her style was polemical, prolix and clichéd: 'There was a long moment, red with pulsing flame'. But it was popular. Smouldering Fires sold 100,000 copies in Australia alone; it ran to eight editions. That year she was in Melbourne, announcing a four-figure income and large publishers' advances for her next romance, Souls in Pawn.

A fair, blue-eyed woman who at 30 still wore long braids that framed her oval face and 'winsome smile', 'Pat' affected a 'child-like simplicity' which could switch to the 'pensive melancholy' evident in her photographs. On 23 September 1914 at St Ninian's Church, Stonehouse, Lanarkshire, Scotland, she married John McNaught Scott with the forms of the Established Church of Scotland. A Harley Street specialist who had treated her consumption, he was then a member of the Australian Army Medical Corps; Web Gilbert sculpted a bust of him. Mrs Scott spent some of the war years in Ireland writing nine more novels. In 1918 she published Earthware in which plot and characterization are more subtle and complex. Much of it again seems autobiographical: a talented authoress, crushed by her insensitive Scottish husband, finally renounces ambition and preserves her marriage. Stonehouse never published another novel.

After the war she and Scott settled at Mortlake, Victoria, a country town in which her early work had been banned. Her last publication was a collection of sentimental poetry, The Caravan of Dreams (1923). People in the district believed that the childless marriage of the Scotts was unhappy. 'Pat' was eccentric: it was said that she fed pet rats and collected chamber pots. After her husband's death in 1942, she lived as a hermit. Seven years later she entered Royal Park psychiatric hospital suffering from 'mental enfeeblement' caused by neglect, a sad outcome for someone who had written, 'O, the trim paths, the prim paths, these are not for me'.

Most of her novels were about women rebelling—against Catholicism, Calvinism, marriage, the English class system—and their settings covered Australia, Britain, India and Indonesia. In her prime, her work had been praised by K. S. Prichard and by the Sydney Morning Herald. While her novels were hastily executed and their reputation did not endure, they had earned her brief fame as 'the Australian Marie Corelli'. Stonehouse died on 1 May 1964 at Mont Park mental hospital and was buried in Footscray cemetery.

Select Bibliography

  • P. Hay (ed), Meeting of Sighs (Warrnambool, Vic, 1981)
  • British Australasian, 20 Mar 1913, 29 Oct 1914
  • Everylady's Journal, 6 July 1913
  • Book Lover, Sept 1913, June 1917
  • East Charlton Tribune, 26 Feb 1898
  • Mortlake Dispatch, 4, 7 June 1913, 23 June, 25 Aug 1920
  • Punch (Melbourne), 5 June 1913
  • Table Talk, 5 June 1913
  • Bulletin, 26 June 1913
  • Herald (Melbourne), 18 Aug 1914
  • private information.

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