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rare books

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Black Maria
4 hours ago, Dust Jacket Collector said:

I wonder why the jackets on flying memoirs seem to have survived better than those on more earthbound volumes ? It can’t just be down to numbers sold - books by Sapper for instance, which sold in vastly greater numbers than these are extremely scarce in jackets whereas many of the John Hamiltons seem to turn up fairly regularly.

Interesting question , maybe those readers of the books on the air war were just more appreciative of the fantastic art work .

 

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dpolglaze
12 hours ago, Dust Jacket Collector said:

I wonder why the jackets on flying memoirs seem to have survived better than those on more earthbound volumes ? It can’t just be down to numbers sold - books by Sapper for instance, which sold in vastly greater numbers than these are extremely scarce in jackets whereas many of the John Hamiltons seem to turn up fairly regularly.

 

Some of the books' smaller runs might have actually led to a higher retention percentage of jackets, as many could have been purchased by specialists.

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Dust Jacket Collector
10 hours ago, Black Maria said:

Interesting question , maybe those readers of the books on the air war were just more appreciative of the fantastic art work .

 

Possibly, but this is reportedly the era when dust jackets were routinely discarded by the bookseller at point of purchase. If you look at some of the covers on detective fiction from the 1930s there’s some fantastic art work most of which has largely vanished. Maybe, as dpolglaze suggests, there were sold in more specialist shops which didn’t follow the usual practice.

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Black Maria
2 hours ago, Dust Jacket Collector said:

Possibly, but this is reportedly the era when dust jackets were routinely discarded by the bookseller at point of purchase. If you look at some of the covers on detective fiction from the 1930s there’s some fantastic art work most of which has largely vanished. Maybe, as dpolglaze suggests, there were sold in more specialist shops which didn’t follow the usual practice.

I never realised the booksellers discarded the jackets*  , if only they knew what a difference it would make to the value of the book in the future !

Similar to when I was a kid and threw away all my Dinky car boxes :doh:

 

* knew it happened in in the early days when the jackets were plain and just designed to protect the book in transit but thought that by the thirties

it had stopped .

 

Edited by Black Maria

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Dust Jacket Collector
5 hours ago, Black Maria said:

I never realised the booksellers discarded the jackets*  , if only they knew what a difference it would make to the value of the book in the future !

Similar to when I was a kid and threw away all my Dinky car boxes :doh:

 

* knew it happened in in the early days when the jackets were plain and just designed to protect the book in transit but thought that by the thirties

it had stopped .

 

I’ve read several times that jackets were discarded but I’ve always been slightly doubtful that it actually happened to any extent. After all by the end of the day booksellers would have been knee deep in discarded jackets! It seems to me more likely that publishers, knowing what was happening, would have just supplied a few copies in jackets for display purposes and leave the rest plain.

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voltaire60

Interesting points above. The old - original- view that DJs were there to protect the book from wear and tear tells the story of most  of their survival or non-survival. Of course, obvious candidates are children's books- for which the rule as to them retaining any value seems to be not to let them anywhere near  children.  When one sees the plain  printed ;paper wrappers  of many (especially non-fiction books- eg The first of Keynes General Theory), then a bookshop must have been a very dull place indeed. To me, a dustwrapper of the collectable variety raises questions about the whole book, what the target market was and what the production values (and price) were overall.  Thus, the readily collectable travel books of the latter part of the Nineteenth Century have generous production values-proper cloth, illustrated and a  visual treat.  By the Great War, direct printing on to  cloth had developed so well that many books on the war have very good images printed on. But a good dustwrapper can often mark a cheaply produced book -  either board instead  of cloth-and unillustrated or colour-blocked into the bargain.

     I do not know the Hamilton air books well enough to comment but I think the "collectability" of the wrappers is unlikely (Why are there not known collections of them=-or indeed,of dustwrappers of the Great War by themselves generally?). Display copies?  Very unlikely.  The run-on costs of producing coloured  illustrated wrappers once you have set up the plates is so negligible that it is very,very unlikely. If they were done to attract the magpie customers by bright illustrations, then only to have a few is most unlikely.

   I suspect that  the survival of the Hamilton wrappers depends on 2 factors- a)  The quality of the paper used   and b)  The production values of the underlying book- a book that falls apart easily is unlikely to have a pristine wrapper.

Just a thought:wub:

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