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Remembered Today:

Bibliography of Books on Salonika, particularly memoirs


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4 hours ago, b3rn said:

Voltaire60, volunteering?

 

      I could not take a lead in this - a recent letter, post-COVID, from our NHS tells me that I am no longer "vulnerable" (Yippee!!)  but have moved up a notch to be "clinically extremely vulnerable"- Lucky me!!

       But I am happy to do a fair share of running around (Correction -hobbling around) towards this end. I mentioned a Gallipoli bib. as a bit of a tease to KR after the excellent work he has done on Salonica.  But the poor lad needs a break from his labours and at least one refill of the glass he is holding in his avatar. Gallipoli is a bigger bibliographical beast -  it's teamwork round a central base that will crack that - so find me the team and I will sign up.

     I have recently put up a thread on little memorial volumes of the Great War, for which there is an excellent bibliography by Tom Donovan. But there are still plenty of the beasties out there to be recorded and nailed down. This ,again-as with KR and Salonica- is in no way a reproach of incompleteness, though the notion of "bibliography" tends to make it synonymous with "completist"  But the way in which books, pamphlets,etc are printed and published both now and in the past means that the chase should always yield new data. A bibliography should aim to be the focus of new information coming in, rather than any sorrow that items were not picked up first time around.

     We are now comfortably past the Great War centenary and,as a former bookseller, when I look around the printed word legacy of the Great War, then it's a mess. We are not short of materials but we are at the Doctor Johnson stage-its not what we know but knowing where to look.  GWF is an example- there are so many threads that topics have been dealt with well but now not easily found.  Huge amounts of new printed stuff appeared in the centennial years but there is no one-stop "go-to" source to keep track of it. Without any form of criticism of IWM, I do wonder how much material it picked up that came out in the centennial years.

    In the UK, the incompleteness of bibliography was shown dramatically  some 30 odd years ago with the construction of a bibliographical brute called ESTC- The Eighteenth Century Short Title Catalogue- which aimed to record all items printed in the UK in the Eighteenth Century or items printed in English abroad. The 3 base libraries for it were the British Library, Bodley at Oxford and the Cambridge University Library. All had huge collections, each had been extant all the way through the Eighteenth Century -Thus, it was assumed that a core bibliography based on those 3 libraries would overlap very considerably-It came as a nasty shock that there was no more than 40% overlap between the holdings of any 2 of the 3 libraries. Yet it was a salutary reminder that, realistically, a bibliography is only as good as the collecting professionalism of libraries in past years. 

    Gallipoli looks a good topic to have a decent crack at-and to have a spreadsheet bibliography that can easily be added to. It is discrete both in time and territory-there are no fuzzy edges.  There are some good listings already but because of the variety of nationalities involved, materials are going to be overlooked because they are printed/published in the "wrong" country. The UK seems fairly well served-IWM, for all its current shortcomings must be the base source for stuff published in the UK. You have the excellent Australian War Memorial-which is probably the best worldwide source library for any of the countries involved. There seems to have been a revival and good work on Turkish materials which should be picked up more. NZ is a bit of a mystery but, obviously, not quite as ahead as AWM. France-well, a bit of a mystery- but the excellent online site "Gallica" -the digitised version of the Bibliotheque Nationale looks to hold a fair few items of which the English-speaking world is ignorant.

     Gallipoli is "do-able" but it needs a central focus-The Gallipoli Association looks the obvious centre.  May I ask if your spreadsheet is available?  A thread on GWF to add to it on a continuing basis looks a gentle way forward.

Pip,pip

Mike 

 

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On 21/11/2020 at 03:33, b3rn said:

 

I have a spreadsheet that aggregates the bibliographies of van Hartesveldt and Fiona McLeod, plus some additions of my own. But it needs work!

 

Voltaire60, volunteering?

 

Am interested in the Canadian version, MartH.

The Canadian Military Experience 1867-1982 O. A Cooke, 1984 second edition, Department of National Defence, Ottawa Canada, Directorate of History, bit late apologies.

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9 hours ago, MartH said:

The Canadian Military Experience 1867-1982 O. A Cooke, 1984 second edition, Department of National Defence, Ottawa Canada, Directorate of History, bit late apologies.

 

Thanks for that. Have taken a quick look at a digital copy borrowed from Internet Archive.

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I don't want to seem at all precious, but would it be worth while to ask the mods to split this thread, and set up a bibliography thread in the Gallipoli section. That might be less confusing for newer members, and maybe more helpful got those with a particular interest in books on the Gallipoli campaign.

 

Keith

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  • 2 weeks later...

More online for Salonika 

https://archive.org/details/14310130RX1.nlm.nih.gov/page/n441/mode/2up  

"In the Orient" page 341, Volume I, History of the American Field Service in France: "Friends of France" 1914-1917 : told by its members, and  https://archive.org/details/historyofamerica03unse/page/182/mode/2up

page 183, Volume III. Various authors including Robert Whitney Imbrie. These American volunteers were working for the French Army as Ambulance drivers.  

 

https://archive.org/details/01120175R.nlm.nih.gov/page/n155/mode/2up

Chapter XII, page 134 Behind the wheel of a war ambulance by Robert Whitney Imbrie 1918 Archive.org.  He was in the Salonika area October 1916 until April 1917.  He later became American Vice Consul in Teheran and  was murdered there in 1924.

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Thanks Maureene, I have the third item the  Imbrie listed already, as a separate volume, but the other two are quite new to me so I will add them for the next release.

 

Keith

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  • 2 weeks later...

Short account, available online

"In Macedonia: The End of Bulgaria" by N C Powell page 304 True World War I stories: sixty personal narratives of the war, catalogued 2001. Originally published as Everyman at War 1930. Archive.org Books to Borrow/Lending Library. Transcription firstworldwar.com

Private Powell arrived Salonika January 1918, served with the 9th East Lancs.Regt. on Doiran sectors until February 1919.

 

Maureen

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Black Maria has just posted something about difficulties getting a book published by Reveille Press (of Eastbourne).  Their website has this item, which I cannot see on your last draft.  Another one for the list?

 

image.png.a939f0d401e9fa6538a58fd123bb4a8d.png

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Thanks Maureene and Voltaire. There will be more I'm sure. If main titles didn't contain some of the obvious keywords, then they were always likely to be missed. That last is another for my shopping list.

 

I should have known about this book though. I met Susan when she joined with an SCS tour in Macedonia, and remember her taking about the material.

 

Keith

Edited by keithmroberts
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....and as there is a post on a death from malaria in Macedonia, this leads on to another 4 possibles:

 

1)   Malaria in Macedonia, 1915-1919 / by C.M. Wenyon ... [et al.].

 [London : John Bale, Sons & Danielsson, 1921-22].

   [Further details from the catalogue of the Wellcome Library:

Physical description

137 pages, 6 leaves of plates : illustrations, map ; 25 cm

 

Full statement of responsibility: / by C.M. Wenyon, A.G. Anderson, K. McLay, T.S. Hele and J. Waterston

Includes bibliographic references

"Reprinted from the Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps, August, 1921-May, 1922"

Author, etc.

Wenyon, C. M. (Charles Morley), 1878-1948.

Anderson, A. G.

McLay, K.

Hele, T. S.

Waterston, J.

 

 

2)   Studies of bacillary dysentery occurring in the British forces in Macedonia / [edited by Leonard S. Dudgeon].

London : H.M.S.O., 1919.

   [Further details from the catalogue of the Wellcome Library:

 

 

Physical description

83 pages ; 25 cm.

Series

Special report series, Great Britain. Medical Research Committee ; no. 40

Special report series (Medical Research Council (Great Britain)) ; no. 40.

Note

At head of title: National Health Insurance. Medical Research Committee.

Author, etc.

Dudgeon, Leonard S. (Leonard Stanley), 1876-1938.

Great Britain. Medical Research Committee.

 

 

 

3)   Rhymes of four fronts : Gallipoli, 1915 ; Macedonia, 1916-17-18 ; Egypt, 1916 ; France, 1918 / by Thomas W. Hudson Kirkintilloch : Printed for the publisher by D. MacLeod Ltd. "Herald" Office, [1919].

 

4)   L'Armée d'Orient vue à 15 ans de distance. [On the French army in Macedonia during the European War 1914-1919. By various authors.]

FRANCE. Army. Armée d'Orient.

Paris, 1932.

 

 

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I don't know if you've had this one mentioned already , published by Reveille Press ( although not on their website ) . About 100 pages about his time at Salonika .

brave an act.jpg

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Thanks all. I may not reply to every additional title, but am adding them almost all to the update in September.

 

Two reservations though - I'm limiting the list to works in English, for purely practical reasons. I'm sure there must be as many French publications, but I have to set a limit somewhere, and generally I'm looking for items that have been published as stand alone works, although some contributions to say regimental journals or divisional histories are clearly substantial enough to merit inclusion.

"As Brave an Act", is another new one on me. I'll be having words with Alan Wakefield who had an early chance to add names to the list. That's two books he has been involved in and not mentioned; OK I should have known one of them as well.

Please keep them coming.

 

Keith

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I don't think this has been mentioned already ?

 

An Unofficial History of the Signal Service with the British Salonika Force 1915-1918   by  Capt CCS White.

 

This 12 page article appears in the RE Journal of Dec 1926 and is free to downlad via the nzsappers site (yet another invaluable find by Maureen !)

 

Charlie

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  • 1 month later...

Hi All, 

 

I'm sitting here writing a book. Well, copying out a book, of sorts. In a bag of old bits and bobs my Mum gave me a few years back are two loose leaf folders of hand written notes - one "complete, ready for revision" and the other a bit rougher. There are 390 pages at least. I've not read them. I'd not even really looked at them before - fazed by the neat, but barely legible writing and more drawn to the Pilots Notes for D.H Mosquito and Log Book of my Grandfather also present in the bag. All I know so far is that my Great Grandfather was part of the 60th Division, part of Cooks Tourists as he called them, and rated the flies and vermin of Palestine over the wet feet of France and extremes of hot and cold in Salonika. I don't know how far the book goes into his career or even if the manuscript was finished. He started it in 1937, stopped in 1939 due to 'certain difficulties' and I can find some reference to him picking it back up in 1954. 

 

My knowledge of WW1 is limited (very limited!) to the western front so this will be a journey of enlightenment.  I'm encouraged to see that Keith's bibliography doesn't include anything by an L W Cocks....although it would save me trying to decipher the handwriting. There are early references to illustrations but alas all I have is some from latter years - he kept a pictorial diary for several months in the 1920's.

 

I wonder if the collective could recommend a book to me? Nothing too detailed but with good coverage of the Salonika front so I can familiarise myself with the battlefield?

 

I must also add that I have no plans beyond simply committing the hand-written word to electronic format to preserve it (especially as there is a 18 month old boy bouncing round the house who is only going to get more adept at getting sticky fingers on things - Oh! for a Study or Office with a door, with a lock on it). If and as and when I finish typing it up...maybe we'll see what state its in.

 

Best regards

 

Stuart

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The (current) publication generally recommended is 

Under the Devil's Eye The British Military Experience in Macedonia, 1915–18 by Alan Wakefield, Simon Moody · 2011

Sample pages Google Books

https://www.google.com.au/books/edition/Under_the_Devil_s_Eye/G7bNDwAAQBAJ?hl=en&gbpv=1&printsec=frontcover

 

For books available online see the FIBIS Fibiwiki page Salonika

https://wiki.fibis.org/w/Salonica_and_the_Balkans_(First_World_War)#Historical_books_online

 

You might read a previous post of mine 

Upload your transcriptions to Archive.org (Internet Archive)

https://www.greatwarforum.org/topic/230450-upload-your-transcriptions-to-archiveorg-internet-archive/?tab=comments#comment-2292808

 

If you Search the Great War Forum, there are various topics about self publishing.

 

Cheers

Maureen

Edited by Maureene
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Hi Maureene, 

 

That's great, many thanks for the recommendation and for the other links. I shall have a good look.

 

Best regards

Stuart 

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Gardenerbill

Hi Stuart, welcome to the forum. If you have any specific questions about the Salonika campaign, there are some very knowledgeable forum pals on here who would be only too happy to help.

 

Another book that may interest you is 'Long Un a Damn Bad Soldier' by Bernard Livermore. Bernard was in the 20th London Regiment part of 60th Division and he writes about his experiences in Salonika. 

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charlie962
15 hours ago, StuM said:

doesn't include anything by an L W Cocks....

If that is your GGF's name then I think he has a partial surviving service record for the 16th London Regt. Salonika with the 2/16th I believe. Anyway this extract shows period of service in Salonika and should help focus on which bits of history to read.

 

courtesy Findmypast

1690317640_GWFSalonikaCocksLW.JPG.2b90cc34c37fc1305d6a2739e7e6851c.JPG

 

 

Hopefully you will post a link on this thread to your GGF's transcript when it is done ?

 

charlie

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Hi Charlie, 

 

Super, thanks for that. 2/16th eh? Their cap badge, I'm sure I've seen it somewhere in a box because it first glance I thought it was something daft like a VC. That was many years ago  now and I think it might be locked in a gun cabinet with some service medals. If only the keys weren't AWOL.

And a service number 551481 by the looks of it. Great to fill in some of my knowledge gaps. I'm looking forward to another deciphering session soon.

 

Best

 

Stuart 

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keithmroberts

You might want to get in touch with Alan Wakefield, he has  at least three  SCS members with books based on thie grandparents' diaries. In normal years he leads at least two group visits to follow the Salonika campaign. This year, if it is possible to visit in September, the tour will probably concentrate on Greece only. 

 

 

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