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Richard Canavan - Indian mutiny - Connaught Rangers


MickyLuv
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Hello everybody, this may be a long shot but I am looking for any (all) information upon my Grandad Richard Canavan who joined the Connaught Rangers in 1919 and subsequently took part in the Indian mutiny in 1920.  He was arrested and locked up for 6 - 7 weeks and then dis-charged. I am guessing he must have had a small role in the mutiny. He died in 1935 in Dublin. 

I have managed to find some letters of dialogue between himself (and later his wife) and the military authorities in Ireland - they were trying to get a pension BUT because he hadn't been locked up for a year or more he got nothing.

 

Many Thanks in advance, Mick

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There is a book on this mutiny that I can't remember the title of. You might want to google search this unit. There is also a book on mutinies in the British ect army that I also can not remember the name of.

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There are some background links on the FIBIS Fibiwiki page Connaught Rangers Mutiny

http://wiki.fibis.org/index.php/Connaught_Rangers_Mutiny  , one of which lists names, but at a quick glance I could not see the name of Richard Canavan

 

There is an online record enlistment/discharge  for him on the National Army Museum website , use the Search link

http://www.nam.ac.uk/soldiers-records/persons , and if I am reading the record correctly, he was not discharged until  6 July 1922, and his conduct was good. He seems to have left in the period after the decision was made to disband the regiment, the   official  date of disbandment of the regiment  was   31 July 1922.

 

If he was in the Army until 1922, there may be a record with the Ministry of Defence, see the FIBIS Fibiwiki page British Army, section  Army personnel serving after January 1921

http://wiki.fibis.org/index.php/British_Army#Army_personnel_serving_after_January_1921  As he was born before 1901, you can check the Finding Aid to see whether the MOD holds a record.

 

Cheers

Maureen

 

Edited by Maureene
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There were three books published on the subject of the mutiny.

 

The Connaught Rangers – T.P. Kilfeather

Mutiny for the Cause – Sam Pollock

The Devil to Pay – Anthony Babbington

 

I've checked the index in the last two and no matches for Canavan. Kilfeather's book does not contain an index but I don't remember any mention of Richard Canavan.

 

There are files at The National Archives that deal with the Mutiny, most are in WO141 and concentrate on the courts martial, sentencing and release of the men. I have some of these files but again no mention of Canavan I'm afraid.

 

There is a service record on ancestry for a Richard Canavan, Connaught Rangers but I no longer have a subscription.

 

John

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PM Me with regards to the service record... 

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On 29/12/2016 at 22:22, James A Pratt III said:

There is a book on this mutiny that I can't remember the title of. You might want to google search this unit. There is also a book on mutinies in the British ect army that I also can not remember the name of.

Yes, I have read a book called The Devils Own, but there was no mention of him. Many thanks....

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On 30/12/2016 at 00:06, Maureene said:

There are some background links on the FIBIS Fibiwiki page Connaught Rangers Mutiny

http://wiki.fibis.org/index.php/Connaught_Rangers_Mutiny  , one of which lists names, but at a quick glance I could not see the name of Richard Canavan

 

There is an online record enlistment/discharge  for him on the National Army Museum website , use the Search link

http://www.nam.ac.uk/soldiers-records/persons , and if I am reading the record correctly, he was not discharged until  6 July 1922, and his conduct was good. He seems to have left in the period after the decision was made to disband the regiment, the   official  date of disbandment of the regiment  was   31 July 1922.

 

If he was in the Army until 1922, there may be a record with the Ministry of Defence, see the FIBIS Fibiwiki page British Army, section  Army personnel serving after January 1921

http://wiki.fibis.org/index.php/British_Army#Army_personnel_serving_after_January_1921  As he was born before 1901, you can check the Finding Aid to see whether the MOD holds a record.

 

Cheers

Maureen

 

Hello and many thanks for the links.  I do have some evidence of his involvement through some letters going back and forth between my Grandad / Grandma and the military authorities as there was some discussion upon whether he was entitled to a pension..in the letters it is confirmed he spent two months in prison for his part in the mutiny.....funny that he was discharged with 'good' conduct....I imagined he was drummed out of the army immediately after his prison sentence...which would have been in 1920....it does say he was discharged in 1922...or at least it seems that way...hmmmm.

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19 hours ago, archangel9 said:

There were three books published on the subject of the mutiny.

 

The Connaught Rangers – T.P. Kilfeather

Mutiny for the Cause – Sam Pollock

The Devil to Pay – Anthony Babbington

 

I've checked the index in the last two and no matches for Canavan. Kilfeather's book does not contain an index but I don't remember any mention of Richard Canavan.

 

There are files at The National Archives that deal with the Mutiny, most are in WO141 and concentrate on the courts martial, sentencing and release of the men. I have some of these files but again no mention of Canavan I'm afraid.

 

There is a service record on ancestry for a Richard Canavan, Connaught Rangers but I no longer have a subscription.

 

John

Hello and many thanks for your response....

I have read the last one....'The Devil to Pay' but not the other two....

As regards the National Archives etc...well, he must have played a very small part as he was only inside for six (not sure of this figure....this ois what his wife stated when writing to the pensions board) months or so....also he wasn't actually court martialled - I have records confirming this fact and also that he was involved...these are from the military pensions department.....

Finally, I am still on ancestry and have found the service record.......

Many thanks, Mick

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  • 3 months later...

You should be able to get his service record off the MOD. I got my great uncle Simon Connells who was in the Mutiny too. Under the name James Connell. He was imprisoned for life commuted to ten years but got out in Feb 23There is a pretty decent facebook page called the Connaught Rangers The Devils Own which has quite a few of the mutineers families on it. I was told the Court Martial records are held until 2020. Babbington managed to get access to them for his book because he is a QC.

Oh they had a right going on getting pensions promised by the Irish government. I have a letter Simon wrote where hes saying he would expect that from John Bull, but never thought an Irishman would do that to him.

Paul

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  • 7 months later...
On 17/04/2017 at 13:46, axial1680 said:

You should be able to get his service record off the MOD. I got my great uncle Simon Connells who was in the Mutiny too. Under the name James Connell. He was imprisoned for life commuted to ten years but got out in Feb 23There is a pretty decent facebook page called the Connaught Rangers The Devils Own which has quite a few of the mutineers families on it. I was told the Court Martial records are held until 2020. Babbington managed to get access to them for his book because he is a QC.

Oh they had a right going on getting pensions promised by the Irish government. I have a letter Simon wrote where hes saying he would expect that from John Bull, but never thought an Irishman would do that to him.

Paul

Thanks very much Paul....I'll get on to this and see whether they will release his records....good man! :-) 

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abc

Edited by Hedley Malloch
repeat of info already in thread.
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  • 2 weeks later...
On 12/31/2016 at 10:16, MickyLuv said:

in the letters it is confirmed he spent two months in prison for his part in the mutiny.....funny that he was discharged with 'good' conduct.

"Good" is the third highest in the seven ways of assessing conduct, below "Exemplary" and "Very good", so if his conduct prior to the mutiny had been blameless the Army may have recognised this, given the context of the mutiny.

 

His prison sentence was well below the level at which discharge from the Army  would have been automatic, but it does imply that if he was not formally court-martialled, the maximum sentence would have been 42 days, awarded by his CO.

 

Ron

Edited by Ron Clifton
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