Jump to content
Free downloads from TNA ×
The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Military Clinometer


Old Tom

Recommended Posts

I have just become the owner of one of these made by Short and Mason in 1905 and am uncertain of its military function. It is engraved with the owners name (A.H. Toms).   I will add a picture in due course.   For the moment it's in a brass like metal nearly 3" diameter and a little more than 1/2" thick. Its method of operation is, I assume, from its sighting holes and side window, that using an internal pendulum device (to establish a vertical) and mirror the elevation (in degrees) of a sighted object is indicated on a graduated scale round the inside of the case. A locking pin, or plunger, is provided on the curved side near the   lanyard swivel. Unfortunately the pendulum has stuck. I have also noted that many, offered for sale, are declared not working. Perhaps for the same reason.

 

I would be very pleased to hear about its usage and if anyone can comment on the possibility of freeing the pendulum. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Often used in Artillery to establish accurate firing elevation of the guns.  Although, from your description, it doesn't sound like clinometers I have known.

Mike Morrison

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Indeed, the only clinos that I had encountered were used as you say. They relied on a bubble to provide a horizontal and had flat surface to 'sit' on a gun part.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is the item Tom has:

 

http://picclick.co.uk/WW1-Military-Clinometer-mk-5-Short-Mason-391583323948.html#&gid=1&pid=1

 

There is nothing to suggest it has a military connection I'm afraid, they could have easily been used for civilian work such as heights and gradients.  The clinometers used by the RA were somewhat different. 

https://www.the-saleroom.com/en-gb/auction-catalogues/lockdales/catalogue-id-lo10058/lot-ca038e65-2f46-4ef4-b2f3-a5b600a9d397

 

TR

 

 

 

Edited by Terry_Reeves
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Terry. You are, of course, quite correct about artillery clinos. Co-incidentally the other reference is to the item I now have. Your reference on the other thread about soil mechanics and measures of slippage is interesting and outside my knowledge and experience. However the accuracy of the process described seems greater that would be achieved with this instrument.

 

The instrument has been called a military clinometer and it is marked with a broad arrow which looks as if it was marked at the same time as the makers details, the owner, date and serial number.  

 

The rear face of the instrument has various neatly  scratched   details. At the top TOMS  1 and in the lower half - in two columns ( the numbers 18 to 45 etc are degrees) :

 

?   =   45                           1 1/4  = 30

1 1/4 = 39                         2        =  26 1/2

1  1/2 =  34                        2 1/2   =  22

                                           3    =  18 

 

These mean nothing to me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 hours ago, Terry_Reeves said:

http://picclick.co.uk/WW1-Military-Clinometer-mk-5-Short-Mason-391583323948.html#&gid=1&pid=1

 

There is nothing to suggest it has a military connection I'm afraid, they could have easily been used for civilian work such as heights and gradients.  

 

 

Although  commonly called the Service Pattern Clinometer, and very often found with Broad Arrow markings (Canadian illustrated here, as I haven't taken photos of mine) to both the instruments and cases.

 

GT.

 

Service Pattern Clinometer.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...