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Remembered Today:

Pte John Ormerod - 16th Bn, Highland Light Infantry


Paul Ormerod

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Remembering John Ormerod - Private 18043, 16th (Service) Bn (2nd Glasgow), Highland Light Infantry - who was killed in action on 18 November 1916.

 

The Soldiers Died in the Great War Database records that John enlisted in the Army in Blackburn.

 

On Saturday 18 November 1916 the 16th Battalion Highland Light Infantry was engaged in the Battle of the Ancre, attacking the Munich and Frankfort Trenches between Leave Avenue and Lager Alley – N.E. of Beaumont Hamel.

 

The 16th Battalion's War Diary records:

"17-19th November 1916

The Battalion under the Command of Lieut R Kyle marched to MAILLY-MAILLET and halted for a meal, and then proceeded to Brigade Headquarters at WHITE CITY. Guides were procured at this point, and the Battalion proceeded to assembly positions at WAGON ROAD N.E. of BEAUMONT-HAMEL at 9.45pm.

The Guides lost their way and connection was broken between Companies, result being that when the assembly position was ultimately reached about 2 am., only "D" Company was intact. The other Coys latterly reached this point, but it was 6am before the whole Battalion was in Battle Positions, which was as follows:-

Right to Left "A" "B" "C" "D" Companies with 17th H.L.I., on our right and 11th Border Regiment on our left.

Zero time 6.10 am

Objectives (1) MUNICH TRENCH

                  (2) FRANKFURT TRENCH

At Zero the Battalion moved forward and "D" Company and part of "C" Company succeeded in entering MUNICH TRENCH with little opposition. A Strong point with from 6 to 8 Machine Guns in the the centre of "A" Coy's front held up the other Coys and while part of the Battalion on our left also entered MUNICH TRENCH, the Battalion on our right was held up by Machine Gun fire. Three platoons of "D" Company pushed forward and took FRANKFURT TRENCH, the remainder of the men having been left to mop up MUNICH TRENCH.

Owing to the attack on our flanks having been unsuccessful, the enemy soon collected in large numbers, and lively bombing duels took place in MUNICH TRENCH. Our small party was quickly overwhelmed, and latterly every man a casualty.

There was no support for the party which entered FRANKFURT TRENCH, but they hung on to the part they had captured, although isolated through the enemy still being in possession of his front line.

The remnant of the Battalion took up position in WAGON ROAD in readiness for any Counter attack which might be launched.

The Battalion was relieved by the 2nd Battalion Inniskilling Fusiliers on the morning of 19th November 1916.

Relief completed by 8.30am.

The Battle Casualties were:-

Killed

Captain W.E. Robinson, 2nd Lieut G.M. Simpson, 2nd Lieut D.A. Milholm, 2nd Lieut G.W. Campbell. 16 Other Ranks.

Wounded

Captain A. McPherson, 2nd Lieut H.A. Agnew, 2nd Lieut C.D. Mitchell. 104 Other Ranks.

Missing

Lieut A. Skene, 2nd Lieut J. Stewart, 2nd Lieut F. Scott. 260 Other Ranks.

Wounded and Missing

2nd Lieut J.M. Bannatyne, 2nd Lieut M.M. Lyons, 2nd Lieut W. Duff. 10 Other Ranks."

 

John has no known grave and his name is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

 

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  • 7 months later...

My mothers uncle, Private William Anderson Moodie (Pte 31615) was also in the 16th  Highland Light Infantry but on the same day (18th August 1916), (last day of fighting on the Somme before winter set in), he was captured and taken prisoner of war. His POW records show that he was taken prisoner at MAILLY  (MAILLY-MAILLET), which according to  "the History of the sixteenth HLI," Chalmers, Pub. McCallum,  was a position where the HLI had been based that day. However, this was behind the British lines so how would he be captured here? His name does not appear on any of the lists as above of those in the Munich or Frankfurt trenches.

 

I would appreciate and suggestions.

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Jim

 

You may have missed that they only rested at Mailly-Maillet for a meal before moving up to battle positions at Wagon Road, NE of Beaumont Hamel.

The War Diary shows that after the battle, 17-19 November, there were 3 Officers and 260 Men missing, plus 3 Officers and 10 Men wounded and missing, mostly seems to have been as a result of taking their objective trench but still being surrounded by superior enemy forces which still held it's front in nearby places

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Thanks for this. No, I was aware that they had rested at Mailly-Maillet as this is covered in the "the History of the sixteenth HLI," Chalmers. However, I am surprised that the German POW records state that he was captured at  Mailly-Maillet as there was no fighting in this area but rather they were closer to Beaumont Hamel.

 

Is there somewhere I can get the names of the 260 men who went missing that's day? Many many thanks.

 

Jim

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Jim

 

There are 167 of 16 HLI dead shown on Soldiers died in the Great War (SDGW) almost all shown as 18th November 1916. The list is on Ancestry UK. Hard to know how to find those on the Red Cross POW database, I don't know if you can search on other than named soldiers etc.

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5 minutes ago, sotonmate said:

Jim

 

There are 167 of 16 HLI dead shown on Soldiers died in the Great War (SDGW) almost all shown as 18th November 1916. The list is on Ancestry UK. Hard to know how to find those on the Red Cross POW database, I don't know if you can search on other than named soldiers etc.

Named soldiers on the search engine only.


Craig

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  • 3 years later...
On 22/06/2017 at 09:02, Jim Anderson said:

My mothers uncle, Private William Anderson Moodie (Pte 31615) was also in the 16th  Highland Light Infantry but on the same day (18th August 1916), (last day of fighting on the Somme before winter set in), he was captured and taken prisoner of war. His POW records show that he was taken prisoner at MAILLY  (MAILLY-MAILLET), which according to  "the History of the sixteenth HLI," Chalmers, Pub. McCallum,  was a position where the HLI had been based that day. However, this was behind the British lines so how would he be captured here? His name does not appear on any of the lists as above of those in the Munich or Frankfurt trenches.

 

I would appreciate and suggestions.

 

Sorry to tag on to an old thread, but where might I find the lists of men that reached the Munich & Frankfurt Trenches,

as mentioned above ?

 

Alan.

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