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On 23/09/2016 at 08:44, PRC said:

 

(132) Benjamin Povey, Serjeant 15904, Military Medal.

SDGW: (13904). Killed in Action. Born Newbury, Berkshire. Enlisted Hammersmith, Middlesex. No place of residence.

CWGC: Aged 30.Thiepval Memorial. Son of James and Hannah Povey, of 23, Park Lane, Newbury, Berks.

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/1549004/POVEY,%20BENJAMIN

1891 Census: Aged 5, born Newbury, Berkshire and living with parents, James, (34, Bricklayer born Sheen, Berkshire) and Hannah, (27, born “Whittlesea”, Cambridgeshire at 3 Kennet Place, Speenhamland, Newbury, Berkshire. 4 siblings.

1901 Census: Aged 15, Grocers Porter, living with widowed mother, Hannah, (37, Charwoman) at Kennet Place, (South View), Newbury. 6 siblings.

1911 Census: Aged 25, single, Male Nurse in a Lunatic Asylum at The Priory, Roehampton, Wandsworth, London.

A website dedicated to the Newbury War Memorial has details of a brother, William Robert Povey, who died earlier in 1916 with serving with the 6th Battalion, Royal Berkshire Regiment. It does reference brother Benjamin also being remembered on the main Newbury memorial, but the link provided to the relevant webpage is broken.

http://westberkshirewarmemorials.org.uk/texts/stories/WBP01185S.php

The relevant part of the panel on the Thiepval Memorial can be seen here:

http://westberkshirewarmemorials.org.uk/grave.php?gpic=1024

He is also remembered on the Speenhamland Shrine in St Nicholas Church, Newbury.

http://westberkshirewarmemorials.org.uk/memorial.php?link=WB088

He was also apparently remembered on the memorial at St Mary’s School, Speenhamland but this is now lost.

http://westberkshirewarmemorials.org.uk/memorial.php?link=WB313

  

 

That's my website. The link is not so much broken as pointing at a page I haven't created yet!  I'm afraid I am in the habit of putting links like this in so I don't forget to make the link when I create the second page. 

 

He are the words I have drafted for the webpage that will, eventually (there is quite a backlog at present), be created:

 

Benjamin Povey

Sergeant 13904 Benjamin Povey, 9th Battalion, Norfolk Regiment

 

Benjamin was born in Newbury in 1885, the son of James Povey and his wife Hannah, née Nicholls. He was the second of their seven children; his arrival was preceded by William Robert (born 1894) and followed by Arthur James (1887), Harry Christopher (1889), Elizabeth (1891), Frederick John (1893), and Ellen Annie (1895). Shortly after Ellen was born her father died aged only 39, she would never know him.

Hannah was left with seven children to raise, the eldest aged only eleven.  She worked as a charwoman, doing her best, hopefully with the support of the wider family.  When the children left school and were able to contribute to the family income life must have become somewhat easier.

Benjamin chose an unusual career, rather than join his Newbury contemporaries in labouring or retail jobs he became a male nurse. By 1911 he was working at a prestigious private hospital in Roehampton called The Priory.  The hospital in described in the census as a licensed house for persons of unsound mind.  The Priory is still in operation in 2016, still treating mental diseases, but probably best known for its many celebrity clients seeking treatment for addictions or eating disorders.

When war arrived on 4 August 1914 the Povey family responded patriotically, Frederick was already in the army and he was rapidly joined by all of his brothers:

Newbury Weekly News, 10 December 1914 – Local War Notes

 

Mrs Povey, of Northampton Terrace, has five sons in His Majesty’s Forces. One is on duty with the RAMC at the Front [Frederick], and on the outbreak of war one joined the Royal Berks [William], another the Norfolks [Benjamin], a third in the Berks Reserves [Harry], and the fourth in the National Reserves [Arthur]. Mrs Povey says she is proud of them, but would be happier if they were all at home again around her table.

 

An early tragedy had already struck the Povey family in September 1914, when Frederick’s baby daughter, Joan, died of meningitis. As a Regular soldier, Frederick was already in France with the Royal Army Medical Corps:

Newbury Weekly News, 1 October 1914 – Deaths

 

POVEY – Sept 18, at Newbury Hospital, of meningitis, aged 3 months, the dearly loved child of Mr and Mrs F J Povey, RAMC, of 2, Roseland-cottages, Newbury. The father of the deceased child is with the British Expeditionary Force.

 

It is not clear how Benjamin ended up serving with the Norfolk Regiment, with whom he enlisted in Hammersmith. He was posted to the 9th (Service) Battalion, one of the many new battalions raised to take in the huge number of young men answering Kitchener’s ‘Your Country needs you’ call.  The battalion was a part of the 71st Brigade in the 24th Division that crossed to France in August 1915. A few weeks later, on 12 October, the entire brigade was transferred to the veteran 6th Division, which had been in France since August 1914.

From October to July 1916 the division manned a section of the line in the Ypres Salient, the infantry battalions taking turns to man the front line, a dangerous activity, but one that all infantrymen became accustomed to. At the end of July the division was moved south, they were headed for the Somme, where the Allied offensive has been raging since the beginning of the month. 

The first month on the Somme was spent preparing for an attack that didn’t happen, followed by a short period of rest.  In early September the division was transferred to XIV Corps on the right hand (southern) end of the British front, its right flank on the northern bank of the River Somme.  The Corps was preparing to attack as a part of 4th Army’s offensive along the line from Gueudecourt to Morval. The offensive, known as the Battle of Flers-Courcelette, is renowned for the first use of tanks on the battlefield. It began on 15 September 1916; the 6th Division were faced with a formidable German defensive position known as The Quadrilateral. The division was allocated 3 of the new machines, the Divisional history records: It was the first occasion on which tanks were employed, and  as far as the Division was concerned was a failure, for  of the three allotted to the 6th Division two broke down  before starting, and the third, moving off in accordance  with orders long before the infantry, had its periscope  shot off, its peep-holes blinded, was riddled by armour-piercing bullets, and had to come back without achieving  anything.

 

To make matters worse, the artillery barrage that was the precursor to the infantry assault was planned with a 200yd gap, to allow the tanks to forge ahead of the infantry in safety.  With no tanks forging ahead, the gap – in the middle of the Quadrilateral – just made the infantry’s task more dangerous.

The Divisional History summarises: The 16th Infantry Brigade attacked on a battalion front - one company of the Bedfords bombing up the trench from Leuze Wood, and the remainder over the open to the north against the south-west face. The Buffs and York and Lancasters supported the attack, but, in spite of the greatest gallantry, could not take the Strong Point. 

 

The 1st Leicesters and the Norfolks, passing through the entrenched Foresters and Suffolks, attacked the  Quadrilateral from the north-west with equal drive, but they too failed. Some ground, however, was made, and by 10 a.m. the 16th Infantry Brigade on the south, and the 71st Infantry Brigade on the north, were digging in close to the enemy's wire and trenches. 

 

The Norfolks suffered 459 casualties – including Sgt Benjamin Povey.

The news reached Newbury a month later and his family inserted a notice in the paper:

Newbury Weekly News, 26 October 1916 – Killed in Action

 

POVEY – Sept 15 in France, Sergt Benjamin Povey, of the Norfolk Regiment, son of Mrs Povey, of St Briavels, Shaw.

 

More detail was published in the news columns:

Newbury Weekly News, 26 October 1916 – Local War Notes

 

The War Office has informed Mrs H Povey, of St Briavels, Shaw, that her eldest son, Sergt Benjamin Povey, of the Norfolk Regiment, was killed in action on September 15th. Sergt Povey had joined up in September, 1914, and had been brought under the notice of the General of the Division for distinguishing himself on May 20, 1916, by attending to wounded men in a section of trench which was being heavily shelled. Mrs Povey lost a son in France in February, and has another son in France, while two more are still in England. All of them heeded their country’s call in the early days of the war, and joined up before Christmas, 1914.

 

The London Gazette dated 27 October 1916 announced the award of the Military Medal to Benjamin, perhaps for the events of 20 May referred to in the newspaper or, perhaps more likely given the timing, for some other act of bravery at a later date.

Benjamin’s body was never identified; his name is remembered on the massive memorial to the missing of the Somme at Thiepval.

Locally he is remembered on the Newbury Town War Memorial and on the parish memorial from St Mary’s Speenhamland – the Speenhamland Shrine – sited in St Nicolas, Newbury, since the demolition of St Mary’s in the 1970s. He was also named on the memorial  [Broken link removed] placed in his old school in Speenhamland (now lost).

He was, of course, also remembered by his family:

Newbury Weekly News, 12 September 1918 – In Memoriam

 

In ever loving memory of Sergt B Povey, 9th Norfolk Regt, who was killed in action, September 15th, 1916. Mother, Sisters and Brothers.

 

The family had suffered another loss in France when William was killed in action on 13 February  1916, seven months before Benjamin.

Most instances where brothers are recorded on the Newbury Town War Memorial are obvious - because the brothers’ names are grouped together (in general the names were distributed by lot).  However, in the case of Will and his brother Benjamin this is not the case – Benjamin is on tablet 5 and Will on tablet 12.

 

Frederick, Harry and Arthur all survived the war.

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(143) Walter Sargent, Private 18655

SDGW: No obvious match

CWGC: Aged 24. Guillemont Road Cemetery. Recovered from the battlefield from Map Reference Sheet Sheet 57c.T.14.d.5.3 in December 1919. One of two graves at this location, the other was a Sherwood Forester. Walters’ grave marker recorded him as “78665 Pte W Sargen, Norfolks”.

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/534671/SARGENT,%20WALTER

 

Possible

1891 Census, (as Walter E.Sargent): Aged 9 months, born Norwich, living with parents William, (Aged 29, Labourer, born Caistor St Edmunds) and Annie R., (26, born Trimley St Mary, Suffolk) at 12 Kings Road, Norwich. 1 sibling.

1901 Census, (as Walter Edwin Sargeant): Aged 10, born Norwich, living with parents William, (38, Paper Maker) and Annie, (36, General Shopkeeper, born Thievial, Suffolk), living at 71 Ber  Street, Norwich. 1 sibling.

1911 Census, (as Walter Sargent): Aged 21, Organ Builder, born Norwich, living with parents William, (50, General Labourer at a Mustard & Starch Works, born Caistor) and Annie, (46, Drapery & Fancy Stores, working on own account, at Trimley, Suffolk) at 83 Ber Street, Norwich. The couple have been married 25 years and have had 2 children, both then still alive.

 

 

(144) Rudolph Saunders, Private 14858

SDGW: Killed in Action. Born Banham, Norfolk. Enlisted Norwich. No place of residence.

CWGC: Thiepval Memorial.

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/811291/SAUNDERS,%20RUDOLPH

Remembered locally on: Banham War Memorial.

http://www.roll-of-honour.com/Norfolk/Banham.html

1901 Census: Aged 6, born Banham, recorded living with parents William Henry, (42, Farmer’s Son, Banham) and Emily Mary, (42, Eye, Suffolk) at Kiln Road, Banham. 5 siblings.

1911 Census: Aged 16, Groom, recorded living with parents at Kiln Road, Banham. William Henry, (52, Millers Carter) and Emily May, (52) have been married 24 years and have had 7 children, all then still alive.

 

Eastern Daily Press, Thursday October 19th 1916

SAUNDERS – September 15, killed in action, Private Rudolph Saunders, Norfolk Regiment, third son of the late W. and Mrs. Saunders, The Laurels, Banham, in his 22nd year.

 

 

(145) George William Smith, Lance Corporal 15286

SDGW: Killed in Action. Born Lakenham, Norfolk. Enlisted Norwich. No place of residence.

CWGC: Thiepval Memorial.

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/812731/SMITH,%20GEORGE%20WILLIAM

Remembered locally on: (possible) Attleborough War Memorial.

http://www.roll-of-honour.com/Norfolk/Attleborough.html

Possible

1891 Census: Aged 11, born Norwich, living with parents George, (40, Corn Merchant) and Hannah Ann, (41, Newton Flotman) at 49 Cambridge Street, Norwich. 1 sibling.

1901 Census, (as George W): Aged 21, born Norwich, Clerk Corn Merchant, living with parents George, (50, Corn Merchant, Shotesham St Mary) and Hannah, (51, Newton Flotman) at 77 Ber Street, Lakenham, Norwich. 1 sibling.

1911 Census: Aged 31, single, Corn Merchant, born South Heigham, Norwich, living with parents at 77, City Road, Norwich. George, (60, Corn Merchant) and Hannah Ann, (61), have been married 35 years and have had 2 children, both then still alive.

 

 

(146) Sidney Arthur Smith, Corporal 15939

SDGW: Killed in Action. Born Northrepps, Norfolk. Enlisted Norwich. No place of residence

CWGC: Aged 24. Guards Cemetery, LesBouefs. One of eight battlefield burials moved there from Map Reference Sheet Sheet 57c.T.14.d.9.3 in August 1919. His grave marker recorded him as “Unknown British Soldier”. The reason was the subsequent identification is not given on the Concentration Report. He was interred in Grave 11.U.7. Recovered at the same time and palce and also identified as an Unknown British Soldier was a body subsequently identified as a Private Larking, 9th Norfolk. He is buried in Grave 11.U.8. Interestingly there is a Private Larkins in this list but his body wasn’t recovered until later and is now at Guillemont – see his entry above. Indeed on the final burial report dated 11th October 1920 the description of the occupant of that grave at Private 15074 E A Larkins has been crossed through and annotated as “Unknown British Soldier”.

 

Son of John Henry Smith, of 13, Egyptian Rd., Riverside Rd., Norwich. Native of Northrepps, Norwich.

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/543648/SMITH,%20SIDNEY%20ARTHUR

Remembered locally on: Cromer War Memorial.

http://www.roll-of-honour.com/Norfolk/Cromer.html

https://www.flickr.com/photos/43688219@N00/8705471202

Baptised as “Sydney” Arthur Smith at St Mary the Virgin, Northrepps on the 27th January 1892. No date of birth was recorded. Parents were John Henry, a Labourer and Sarah Anna.

1901 Census: Aged 9, born Northrepps, living with parents John, (41, General Labourer, born Northrepps) and Sarah, (38, born Southrepps). 2 siblings.

1911 Census: Aged 19, Footman, living in employers household at Northrepps Hall. Brother George Cyril of the 9th Battalion would die of wounds on the 26th September 1916 and is buried at St Sever Cemetery, Rouen.

 

 

(147) Benjamin Snelling, Private 3/10614

SDGW: Killed in Action. Born St Martin’s, Norwich. Enlisted Norwich. No place of residence.

CWGC: Thiepval Memorial.

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/813495/SNELLING,%20BENJAMIN

Service records indicate he was born circa 1879.

1881 Census: Aged 4, born Norwich, living at Goats Yard, Oak Street, St Martin at Oak, Norwich. This was the household of his parents James, (32, Shoemaker, born Norwich) and Susannah, (32, Horsehair Weaver, born Norwich). 5 siblings.

1891 Census: Aged 14, Boot Heeler, living with parents at 19 Knowsley Road, Norwich.

1897 Marriage: The marriage of a Benjamin Snelling to an Alice Rix was recorded in the Norwich District in Q4 of this year.

1901 Census: Aged 24, Bricklayer, Married head of household at 8, Bexfield Buildings, Rupert Street, Norwich. Lives there with wife Alice, (23, born Norwich) and their three children, May A, (3), Ellen M, (2) and Alice, (10 months).

1903 Death of first wife: The death of Alice Snelling, aged 27, was recorded in the Norwich District in Q3 of this year.

1906 Marriage: The marriage of a Benjamin Snelling to a Rosa Cooper was recorded in the Norwich District in Q4 of this year.

1911 Census: Aged 34, Bricklayer, head of household at No.9 Branford Road, Norwich. Although he is recorded as married I suspect he has been widowed since the last census as he and wife Rosa, (30), have been married just 4 years. They have also had 3 children together although only one was still alive. As well as the children from his first marriage – May, (13), Eleanor, (12), Florence, (10) and Benjamin, (9), there is also the one child from the second, Herbert, (1). All the children were born Norwich.

Post August 1911 it became compulsory when registering a birth in England and Wales to also record the mothers maiden name. While a search of the General Registrars Office Index of births for England and Wales does reveal a number of births throughout the 20th Century for the combination of surname Snelling, mothers maiden name Cooper, but the early years of the new system show a smattering of Norwich registered births:-

Q4 1912…….Doris

Q1 1914…….Lily

Q1 1915…….Hazel

Q2 1916…….Maud

 

 

(148) Frederick Sowells, Private 15002

SDGW: Killed in Action. Born Colchester, Essex. Enlisted Norwich. No place of residence.

CWGC: Thiepval Memorial.

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/813675/SOWELLS,%20FREDERICK

Remembered locally on: Morley St Botolph War Memorial.

http://www.roll-of-honour.com/Norfolk/MorleyStBotolph.html

1892 – Birth: The birth of a Frederick Edmund Sowells was recorded in the Colchester District of Essex in the October to December quarter, (Q4) of this year.

1901 Census (as Frederick Sauls): Aged 8, born Colchester, living with uncle and aunt at High Green, Deopham. They are Frederick Barker, (25, Teamster on Farm, born Deopham) and Priscilla Baker, (27, born Docking).

1911 Census: Aged 17, born Colchester, Essex, Farm Labourer living with widowed Grand-mother Mary Ann Barker, (78, born Bunwell, Norfolk), at Wymondham Road, Morley St Botolph.

 

 

(149) Reginald Staff, Corporal 14565

SDGW: Killed in Action. Born Flixton, Suffolk. Enlisted Norwich. No place of residence.

CWGC: Thiepval Memorial.

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/1553881/STAFF,%20REGINALD

Remembered locally on: Harleston War Memorial.

http://www.roll-of-honour.com/Norfolk/Harleston.html

Possibly

1901 Census, (as Reginald E): Aged 2, born Harleston, living with parents Frederick J, (26, Groom, born Harleston) and Ellen Y., (31, born Stradbrooke, Suffolk at Bungay Road, Redenhall with Harleston. 2 siblings.

1911 Census, (as Reginald Ernest): Aged 12, living with parents Frederick James, (36, Veterinary Surgeons Groom) and Louisa, (38, born Oakby, Eye, Suffolk). This is presumably a second marriage as the couple state they have only been married 8 years and have had 5 children, of which 3 were then still alive. However including Reginald there are 6 children shown living with them, plus there are details for two more that have been struck through. The family are living at Eversons Yard, Harleston.

 

Eastern Daily Press, Monday October 23rd 1916

STAFF-September 15, killed in action, Corporal R.Staff, dearly loved son of Mr. and Mrs F.Staff, Candler’s Lane, Harleston, aged 25 years.

Dearly loved and deeply mourned by all who knew him.

  • From his sorrowing Mother, Father, Sister, Brothers, and Ethel.

(150) Aubrey Samuel Stone, Lance Corporal 14304

SDGW: Killed in Action. Born “Burgh-Apton”, Norfolk. Enlisted Norwich. No place of residence.

CWGC: Thiepval Memorial.

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/1554813/STONE,%20AUBREY%20SAMUEL

1901 Census: Aged 7, born Bergh Apton, living with parents John R, (34, Agricultural Labourer, born Poringland) and Mary A, (31, born Brooke) at The Street, Bergh Apton. 4 siblings.

1911 Census: Aged 17, Farm Labourer, living with parents John, (44, General Labourer) and Alice (41) at Bergh Apton. The couple have been married 21 years and have had 11 children of which 10 are then still alive.

 

Eastern Daily Press, Friday October 20th 1916

 

STONE – September 15, killed in action, Lance-Corporal A.S.Stone of the Norfolks, second son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Stone, Bergh Apton, aged 22.

We miss him most, who loved him best.

From Mother, Father, Sisters and Brothers.

 

 

(151) Henry George Suffling, Private 16476

SDGW: Killed in Action. Born St Pancras, Middlesex. Enlisted London. No place of residence.

CWGC: Guillemont Road Cemetery. One of nine battlefield burials moved there from Map Reference Sheet Sheet 57c.T.14.d.5.3 in December 1919. There was one other Norfolk Regiment man,plus a 10th Battalion Officer, (10th were home service only) and 6 Unknown British Soldiers. On his original grave marker he was identified as “Pte H Suple 16476 Norfolk Reg”.

 

Youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. R. Suffling, of 23, Peckwater St., Kentish Town, London.

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/534735/SUFFLING,%20HENRY%20GEORGE

Born: 9th September 1894, St Pancras, Middlesex.

https://livesofthefirstworldwar.org/lifestory/4309193

1901 Census: Aged 7, born St Pancras, London, living with parents William, (56, Carpenter & Joiner, born Gt Yarmouth) and Rachael, (54, born St Pancras, London) at 23 Peckwater Street, St Pancras, Kentish Town, London. 6 siblings.

1911 Census: Aged 17, Electric Meter Maker, still living with parents William, (67) and Rachael, (63) at 23 Peckwater Street. The couple have been married 43 years and have had 11 children, of which 10 were then still alive.

 

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(152) George Temple, Lance Corporal 13358

SDGW: Killed in Action. Born “Fulmodestone”, Norfolk. Enlisted Norwich. No place of residence.

CWGC: Thiepval Memorial.

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/815407/TEMPLE,%20GEORGE

Remembered locally on : Barney War Memorial, (as William – probably).

 

 

http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/4583541

1901 Census, (as William): Aged 6, born Fulmodeston, living with parents James, (32, Agricultural Labourer, born Hindringham) and Elizabeth, (31, born Barney). 4 siblings.

1911 Census, (as George William): Aged 16, Teaman, born Fulmodestone, living with parents James William, (41, Teaman on Farm, born Hindringham) and Sarah Elizabeth, (40, born Barney) at Barney, Guist. The couple have been married 21 years and have had 8 children, of which 7 were then still alive.

 

 

(153) Thomas Christopher Chasen Tooley, Lance Corporal 15524

SDGW: Killed in Action. Born and Enlisted Great Yarmouth. No place of residence.

CWGC: Thiepval Memorial.

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/816727/TOOLEY,%20THOMAS%20CHRISTOPHER%20CHASEN

 

Remembered locally on: Gt.Yarmouth War Memorial

http://www.roll-of-honour.com/Norfolk/GtYarmouth_WW1_T.html

Birth: The birth of a Thomas Christopher C Tooley was registered in the Flegg District of Norfolk in the October to December quarter, (Q4), of 1891.

1901 Census: Aged 9, born Runham Vauxhall, Norfolk, living with parents Thomas R, (38, Stone & Marble mason, born Gt.Yarmouth) and Ellen R, (37, born Gt.Yarmouth) at 1, North River Road, Runham Vauxhall, Gt.Yarmouth. 5 siblings.

1911 Census: Aged 19, Engine Turner, boarding at 20 Waits Road, Springfield Road, Chelmsford, Essex. One of his brothers was also boarding at the same address.

His father, ‘Thos Robt”, a married Stonemason was recorded on the same census as the only person living at 1, North River Road. He has not completed the boxes about how long he has been married or how many children the marriage has produced.

(There is no obvious match for his mother).

 

 

(154) George Townshend, Lance Serjeant 13792

SDGW: Died. Born Ashmanhaugh, Norfolk. Enlisted Norwich. No place of residence.

CWGC: Thiepval Memorial

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/816876/TOWNSHEND,%20GEORGE

 

Remembered locally on: Ashmanhaugh War Memorial.

http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/4558680

1901 Census: Aged 5, born Ashmanhaugh, living with parents William, (42, Ordinary Agricultural Labourer, born Westwick) and Harriet, (36, born Salhouse) at The Common, Ashmanhaugh. 4 siblings.

1911 Census: Aged 15, Farm Labourer, living with parents William (52) and Harriet (46) at Church Cottage, Ashmanhaugh. The couple have been married 26 years and have had 11 children, all then still alive.

 

 

(155) William Robert Turner, Private 13713

SDGW: Killed in Action. Born Thorpe Market, Norfolk. Enlisted Norwich. No place of residence.

CWGC: Aged 26.Thiepval Memorial. Son of George and Martha M. Turner, of Thorpe Market, Norwich.

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/817479/TURNER,%20WILLIAM%20ROBERT

 

Remembered locally on: Thorpe Market War Memorial.

http://www.roll-of-honour.com/Norfolk/ThorpeMarket.html

1891 Census, (as “Wm Robt”): Aged 11 months, born Holyhead, Anglesey, living with parents George, (33, Game Keeper, born Roughton) and Martha “My”, (31, born Ireland) at Wynnstay, Ruabon, Denbighshire, Wales. 1 sibling.

1901 Census, (as William R): Aged 10, born Holyhead, Wales, recorded living with parents George, (43, Rabbit Catcher, born Roughton) and Martha M, (41, born Ireland) “Near the Green, Thorpe Market”. 3 siblings.

1911 Census, as William Robert: Aged 20, (although transcribed as 28 on the genealogy site I use), single and a Nurseryman on the Estate Gardens, he was living with parents George, (53, Farm Labourer) and Martha Mary, (51, born County Down, Ireland) at Thorpe Market. The couple have been married 30 years and have had 5 children, all then still alive.   

 

 

(156) Bertie George Wakefield, Private 25350

SDGW: Killed in Action. Born “Brinty”, Norfolk. Enlisted East Dereham, Norfolk. No place of residence.

CWGC: Aged 23.Thiepval Memorial. Son of Emma Wakefield, of Bintry Mills, Guist, Norfolk, and the late Henry Wakefield; husband of Anna Wakefield.

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/818279/WAKEFIELD,%20BERTIE%20GEORGE

 

Remembered locally on: Bintree Roll of Honour.

https://www.warmemorialsonline.org.uk/node/209152

1901 Census: Aged 7, born Bintree, living with parents Henry, (47, Stockman on Farm, born Thornage) and Emma, (46, born Elmham) near the Mill at Bintree. 1 sibling.

1911 Census: Aged 17, Flour Mill Carter, living with parents Henry, (57) and Emma, (55) at “Near Bintree Mills”, Bintree, East Dereham.

 

 

(157) Archie Ward, Private 16267

SDGW: Killed in Action. Born Roughton, Norfolk. Enlisted Norwich. No place of residence.

CWGC: Thiepval Memorial

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/819091/WARD,%20ARCHIE

 

Remembered locally on: Roughton War Memorial.

http://www.roll-of-honour.com/Norfolk/Roughton.html

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/43688219@N00/14492532003/in/album-72157644994770800/

1891 Census: Aged 5, born Roughton, living at Chapel Road, Roughton. Living with “parents” Alfred, (42, Agricultural Labourer) and Elizabeth, (42) – both born Roughton. The couple also had an older daughter Rosetta. An Archie Ward, son of a single parent Rosetta Ward was baptised at Roughton on the 1st February 1886. The childs date of birth is given as the 4th January 1886.

1901 Census: “Archer” Ward, aged 15, living with grandparents Alfred, (52) and Elizabeth, (52) at Road, Roughton.

1911 Census: Aged 25, Farm Labourer, single and living with widowed “mother” Elizabeth at Chapel Road, Roughton.

 

From The Norfolk Chronicle, December 15th 1916.

 

30083347426_36e42472d7_z.jpgPrivate Archie Ward 9th Norfolks 1916 by Moominpappa06, on Flickr

 

Private Archie Ward, Norfolks, of Roughton, killed in action on Sept.15th, 1916. The following letter has been received from his Platoon Officer:-

Dear Mrs Turner,

 

I am unable to give you any details of Private Ward’s death as I was myself hit that day. But may I say this of him that he was one of as fine a platoon of British lads, gentlemen every one of them, as any officer will ever command. Men of this stamp only die one way,

 

Yours sincerely,

Claude Morgan, Lt.

 

 

 

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(158) Thomas Warnes, Private 18322

SDGW: Killed in Action. Born Thurlton, Norfolk. Enlisted Norwich. No place of residence.

CWGC: Thiepval Memorial

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/819368/WARNES,%20THOMAS

 

Remembered locally on: Wymondham War Memorial.

http://www.roll-of-honour.com/Norfolk/Wymondham.html

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/43688219@N00/2927477572

 

And Thurlton War Memorial.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/43688219@N00/26607806461/in/album-72157667703026825/

1891 Census, (as Tom): Aged 8 months, (he has a twin brother Frederick), born Thurlton, recorded living with parents William, (42, “Cat Vermin Distroyer”, Thurlton) and Adeline, (39, born ‘Albourh’ at Low Road, Thurlton. 8 siblings.

1901 Census, (as Thomas): Aged 10, still living with parents William, (57, Market Gardener) and Adeline, (48, no place of birth recorded) at Low Road, Thurlton. Thomas’ twin is now recorded as Walter . As well as those two there are  4 other siblings.

1911 Census, (as Tom): Tom and Walter, 20, both work as Garden Labourers and lives with parents, William Henry, (63, Rabbit Catcher), and Adeline, (62, born “Wailand, Suffolk). They were living at Low Road, Thurlton The couple have been married 35 years and have had 15 children, of which 12 were then still alive.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  

(159) George Watson, Private 14860

SDGW: Killed in Action. Born West Lynn, Norfolk. Enlisted Norwich. No place of residence.

CWGC: Thiepval Memorial

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/819651/WATSON,%20GEORGE

There are several potential matches from the census but most are either a bit on the old side or a bit too young – putting aside lying about age \ recruiting officer turning a blind eye. There are a father and son combination either of whom could have been this man.

1901 Census: Father George, (36, Deal Porter, born West Lynn) and son George W, (9, born West Lynn) were recorded at a dwelling “Near the Lows”, West Lynn, living with wife\mother Ruth, (33, born Walpole). There are two other children \ siblings in the household.

1911 Census: Father George Henry, (46) and son George William, (19, Hawker) were recorded living “Near the River Bank”, West Lynn. George Henry and his wife Ruth have been married 19 years and have had 7 children of which 4 were then still alive.

 

(The Kings Lynn War Memorial does have a George West but the Roll of Honour site has identified that as Private 7672, 2nd Battalion, Norfolk Regiment who died in Mesopotamia on the 23rd September 1916.)

http://www.roll-of-honour.com/Norfolk/KingsLynn.html

There is a separate memorial in West Lynn as well, but apparently this was in a poor state of repair, (2007) and the names were practically illegible. There was even talk of knocking it down and starting again. Whatever the outcome there doesn’t seem to be a picture or list of the names remembered online.

Going back to the old 1920’s publication and checking the names recorded against West Lynn, George isn’t one of them.

 

 

(160) Richard Webb, Private 15354

SDGW: Killed in Action. Born Gt Dunham, Norfolk. Enlisted Norwich. No place of residence.

CWGC: Thiepval Memorial

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/820020/WEBB,%20RICHARD

Remembered locally on Great Fransham Roll of Honour.

http://www.breckland-rollofhonour.org.uk/fransham_gt.html

and Great Fransham War Memorial.

http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/4460273

1901 Census: Aged 9, born Great Dunham, recorded living with parents Arthur, (41, Teamster on Farm, born Gressenhall) and Christana, (46, born Little Fransham) at Castleacre Road, Great Dunham. 6 siblings.

1911 Census: Aged 19, Labourer, living with parents Arthur, (50, born Beetley) and Christiana, (53) at Upgate Street, Harpley. The couple have been married 30 years and have had 8 children, all then still alive.

(He is not remembered on the Harpley War Memorial)

 

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On ‎24‎/‎09‎/‎2016 at 20:06, TTracer44 said:

Hello PRC 

                 Chris is possible on the right track with this one, as there is a place by the name of Christchurch just to the south of Three Holes, its now listed as in Cambridgeshire but is very close to the Norfolk border and could very well have been part of Norfolk in the past, you may well have already sorted this one if so good luck 

 

For my sins in the pre-internet days & GPS days I picked up a project to consolidate all the different gazetteers covering Norfolk used by government departments, local councils and voluntary organisations. As many of then went partially outside the county I also had to go five miles beyond to the west and south. The biggest arguments seemed to always be on the border over villages neither counties authorities wanted  :-)

 

I'm surprised I'd forgotten that Christchurch as it was one of the ones that bounced back and forward. I suspect all the copies of my consolidated list have long since disappeared - even I've only got it on floppy disk somewhere!

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On ‎03‎/‎10‎/‎2016 at 02:15, chrismac said:

I have a photo of William Dewing (as above)

 

30129028286996.jpg

 

and the contact details for John Fox (as above) who is a gg neice (?) and could add a bit more

 

His brother Herbert was killed six weeks earlier in submarine E25 when it was sunk of the Dutch coast

 

 

Thanks Chris - so that's definitely the Walsingham man then and I can drop the possibly :-)

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15 hours ago, Phil Wood said:

 

That's my website. The link is not so much broken as pointing at a page I haven't created yet!  I'm afraid I am in the habit of putting links like this in so I don't forget to make the link when I create the second page. 

 

And a good site it is to, sir. My aim wherever possible is to point people to the original online sources of information where possible and give credit where its due - and also to check out the veracity for themselves rather than just take my word for it. I suspect I won't come across much on Benjamin from the Norfolk end but if I do I'll post it here,

 

All the best,

Peter

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1 hour ago, PRC said:

Thanks Chris - so that's definitely the Walsingham man then and I can drop the possibly :-)

Absolutely - relatives still living in the village

 

I should have posted up Frederick Fox not John Fox

 

I am the same chris who compiled the -

 

http://www.roll-of-honour.com/Norfolk/GreatWalsingham.html

 

also there are photos of the two Aldis brothers here

 

https://norfolk.spydus.co.uk/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/ENQ/PICNOR/BIBENQ?ENTRY=aldis&ENTRY_NAME=BS&ENTRY_TYPE=K&SEARCH_FORM=%2Fcgi-bin%2Fspydus.exe%2FMSGTRN%2FPICNOR%2FBSEARCH%3FHOMEPRMS%3DBSEARCHPARAMS&SORTS=SQL_REL_TITLE&CF=PICNOR&ISGLB=0&GQ=aldis

 

 

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On 24/09/2016 at 20:06, TTracer44 said:

Hello PRC 

                 Chris is possible on the right track with this one, as there is a place by the name of Christchurch just to the south of Three Holes, its now listed as in Cambridgeshire but is very close to the Norfolk border and could very well have been part of Norfolk in the past, you may well have already sorted this one if so good luck 

 

 

not sure how to directly reply to someone so please accept my apologies for going off track with this

 

it is intended for TTracer44, please see regarding Coldstream Guards

https://norfolk.spydus.co.uk/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/ENQ/PICNOR/BIBENQ?ENTRY=Bryant&ENTRY_NAME=BS&ENTRY_TYPE=K&SEARCH_FORM=%2Fcgi-bin%2Fspydus.exe%2FMSGTRN%2FPICNOR%2FBSEARCH%3FHOMEPRMS%3DBSEARCHPARAMS&SORTS=SQL_REL_TITLE&CF=PICNOR&ISGLB=0&GQ=Bryant

 

 

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10 hours ago, PRC said:

And a good site it is to, sir. My aim wherever possible is to point people to the original online sources of information where possible and give credit where its due - and also to check out the veracity for themselves rather than just take my word for it. I suspect I won't come across much on Benjamin from the Norfolk end but if I do I'll post it here,

 

All the best,

Peter

 The issue I would like to find out more about is his Military Medal - it's so frustrating that there isn't good source of citations.

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6 hours ago, Phil Wood said:

 The issue I would like to find out more about is his Military Medal - it's so frustrating that there isn't good source of citations.

 

I've gone through the Battalion War Diary from arrival in France to the end of 1916 and can't readily see any mention of a Military Medal for him - strange as there are plenty of others and some list the action for which it was awarded as well.

 

There is a separate MIC for the award of his Military Medal - if nothing else it might give a date the award was authorised or gazetted, which a) gives you a potential gazette day and (b ) provides an "best before date" as to when it might have been awarded.

http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/D6208773

 

The Battalion landed at Boulogne on the 30th August 1915. If you have his MIC presumably he arrived then or shortly afterwards as it looks like he qualified for the 1914/15 Star, (but that could be 2+2=5 on my part). Ancestry has two Medal Roll entries plus possibly a bit of his service record, but unfortunately I don't have a subscription. I did try the local library earlier today to see if I could track that service record extract down on FindMyPast but drew a blank.

 

I suspect that award was confirmed posthumously and so doesn't get a mention in the War Diary.

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I can find no service record (partial or complete) on Ancestry or FindMyPast.

 

The MM was gazetted 27 October 1916 - I suspect it was awarded for his actions at Flers (about the right sort of gap and a goodly number of Norfolks in the 12 page long list, so it must have been a major action).

 

A quick scan of the Gazette (ie I may have missed a couple) shows the following Norfolks awarded the MM in that issue):

8552 L/Cpl R Auker
5720 Pte J A Bailey
4318 Sgt C Ball
14524 L/Sgt F Bridges
14727 Cpl S Carr
14620 Cpl C Clark
15411 Pte C Cooke
15017 A/Cpl H M Cornish
14920 Pte H G Curson
7013 Sgt G B Dickerson
14424 Sgt F W Fish
5571 Sgt W E Freeman
8813 Pte G A Greenacre
8747 Pte W H Harvey
7247 L/Cpl S Hedgeley
15655 Sgt F H Howson
15496 Sgt T F Masters
13904 Sgt B Povey
7272 CSM C Pryer 
8658 Sgt H Reeve
3/7136 Pte J S Riches
8971 Pte J Starling
8344 L/Cpl W F Wilkins
15675 Sgt G J Wilmott
8991 Pte H Wilson


If any of them died before Flers my theory will, of course, be blown out of the water!

 

It's just a shame that all records of the reasons for these awards have been thrown away.

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On ‎23‎/‎09‎/‎2016 at 13:51, clk said:

 

Re (126) James Palmer, Private 22127

 

Soldier's Effects shows that James the father of James was still alive in November 1919, as the war gratuity payment was made to him

 

Re (137) Herbert Leonard Ramm, Private 19659

It may help to narrow down the options, Soldiers' Effects shows that the father of Herbert was also called Herbert, and that he was still alive in October 1919

 

Re (139) Albert Edward Reece, Serjeant 14409

Soldiers' Effects shows that his mother was a Susannah C. Still alive in October 1919

 

 

 

Thanks Chris.

 

I've had no joy with Sidney James in the Newspapers at the County Archive...so far !

 

Re (126) James Palmer, Private 22127

 

While father James also had a father James, that individual was no longer alive by 1919, so the balance of probability has got to be that it was the younger James, born circa 1899, who fell on the 15th September 1916.

 

Re (137) Herbert Leonard Ramm, Private 19659

 

From his service records.

 

Herbert Leonard enlisted on June 19th 1915. His parents were living at Field Dalling Road, Melton Constable.When he enlisted he was 19 years and 3 months older and worked as a General Labourer. He was 5 feet and four and three quarter inches and weighed 120lbs. He was posted from the Norfolk Regiment Depot to the 9th Battalion on July 31st 1915. However the Casualty Form actually shows him going first to the 24th Infantry Base Depot before finally arriving with the battalion on the 17th January 1916.

 

Post War the Government  paid out a War Gratuity and to kick the process off for those who had deceased a form, W5080, was sent out to the next of the kin. The form was based on the inheritance hierarchy that applied at the time. His father and mother was Herbert and Charlotte Ramm of Bale, Melton Constable.

 

However that still provides a slight problem. The individual who was born in the Walsingham District, (which included Bale & Melton Constable) in the April to June quarter, (Q2), of 1895 was a Herbert Edgar Ramm, while a Herbert Arthur Ramm was born in the same District in the October to December quarter, (Q4), of 1896. A check of the censuses shows that Herbert Arthur was born Hindringham and was living at Wighton on the 1901 census, with parents Herbert and Martha so probably can be discounted.

 

Checking out the 1901 census Herbert Edgar, aged 5, born Bale was recorded living at a “Cottage in the Village”, Bale with his parents William David and Louisa Ann.They have a younger son, Leonard Noah, aged 2, born Bale and my initial thought is that maybe the younger Leonard lied about his age and used some of his older brothers details. However there is an obvious candidate for the deaths of both Herbert Edgar (1970) and Leonard N (1963) in the death index for England and Wales – indeed both deaths were recorded in Norfolk.

 

On the 1911 census there is a 14 year old “Lenard”Ramm, born Bale, who was recorded living at Field Dalling Road, Bale, Briningham. However, his parents Herbert, (35, Grocers Shop Assistant, born Bale) and Charlotte, (34, born Bale), have only been married 9 years. The couple state they have had six children, all then still alive, and including Lenard there are indeed six children in the household.

 

The marriage of a Herbert James Ramm to a Charlotte Dix was recorded in the Walsingham District of Norfolk in the July to September quarter, (Q3), of 1902.

The birth of a Herbert Leonard Dix was recorded in the Walsingham District in the July to September quarter, (Q3), of 1896.

 

The baptism of a Herbert Leonard Rix, born 29th May 1896, took place at All Saints, Bale, on the 5th July 1896. Single parent was Charlotte Dix, who lived at Bale.

http://freereg2.freereg.org.uk/search_records/5510c627e93790ccb6ac6e3c?search_id=57f5722ef4040bd5d080c02d

 

However neither Charlotte or her son Herbert, (or Leonard), make an obvious appearance on the 1901 Census of England and Wales – until you track her back to the 1881 census and discover that she lived with her mother and step-father John and Rachel Preston although she was still shown as a Dix. On the 1901 census a 4 year old Leonard Dix, born Bale, was living in the household of his grandparents John and Rachael Preston. He has been mis-transcribed on the Genealogy site I use as Leonard Preston. Charlotte “Preston, single, is meanwhile a domestic servant in London.

 

Re (139) Albert Edward Reece, Serjeant 14409

 

Still no obvious candidates on the census. Potential birth matches in the Cardiff District for an Albert Edward Reece occur in  Q2 1893, Q2 1898 and at a stretch Q4 1903.

 

The first of those is probably the 7 year old Albert E, born Cardiff who was recorded living in Cardiff with his parents William and Letitia on the 1901 census.

 The second is most likely the 2 year old Albert E, born Barry, Glamorganshire, who was living with his parents Thomas and Eleanor in Barry.

 There is no obvious match for the third on the Census for England and Wales, nor is there a likely death to account for that absence.

 

Thanks for your help,

Peter

Edited by PRC
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16th September 1916**********************************

 

Battalion War Diary.

 

Trenches

Relieved early morning by D.L.Is. Marched back to trenches S.of Guillemont, collecting men during the day and getting them together. Moved further back late in Eve to trenches near TRONES WOOD + BERNAFAY WOOD. Remainder of officers and men who were left out at transport joined Battln.

 

(161) Arthur Coe. Serjeant 5261

SDGW: Died of Wounds. Born East Dereham, Norfolk. Enlisted Norwich. No place of residence.

CWGC: Grove Town Cemetery, Meaulte.

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/30848/COE,%20ARTHUR

In September 1916, the 34th and 2/2nd London Casualty Clearing Stations were established at this point, known to the troops as Grove Town, to deal with casualties from the Somme battlefields.

http://www.cwgc.org/find-a-cemetery/cemetery/3200/GROVE%20TOWN%20CEMETERY,%20MEAULTE

While FindMyPast does not appear to have any WW1 Service Records for Arthur, (so presumably lost in the Blitz), it does have a Private 5261 A.Coe, 2nd Battalion, Norfolk Regiment, who qualified for the Queen’s South Africa Medal in the Boer War, although there are no additional clasps for specific actions.

That Service number would indicate he enlisted sometime between January 1899 and March 1900.

http://armyservicenumbers.blogspot.co.uk/2009/07/norfolk-regiment-1st-2nd-battalions.html

1891 Census: Aged 10, born East Dereham, living at 81 Baxter Row, East Dereham.  There is no adult listed as the Head of the Household. The wife of the head is Ann Coe, (aged 38, born East Dereham). 2 siblings, although the oldest of these is 21.

1901 Census: No match for Arthur, but he would have been in South Africa at the time.

Q4 1908 Marriage: Arthur Coe married Edith Emma Polley in the Lexden District of Essex.

1911 Census: Aged 29, Labourer in an Iron Foundry, married head of the household at 37 Baxters Row, East Dereham. He and wife Edith, (30, born Colchester, Essex), have been married 2 years, but so far have no children.

There are no children registered in England and Wales with the surname Coe, mothers maiden name Polley.

On the 1912 Register of Norfolk Electors, he was recorded at 37 Baxters Row, East Dereham..

After that however he disappears from the list for East Derham and I can’t find an obvious match for him elsewhere.

Note: There is a baptism recorded for an Arthur Coe, born 21st March 1882, which took place at St.Nicholas, East Dereham on the 30th March 1882. Parents were James, a Labourer, and Maria, the family lived at Dereham.

There is a Maria Cole recorded on the census from 1881 onwards, except for 1891. I suspect she and Ann are one and the same person as Ann only appears on the 1891 census.

1881  - Maria, 28,  lives with James at Baxters Row, East Dereham.

1901 – Maria, 50, still married, lives with a boarder  at The Fenn, Scarning.

1911 - Maria, 57, widowed, lives with a boarder at 89 South End, East Dereham.

(Arthur is not remembered on the East Dereham War Memorial).

 

 

(162) George Colman, Private 18246.

SDGW: Died of Wounds. Born Kettlestone, Norfolk. Enlisted Norwich. No place of residence.

CWGC: Aged 23. Corbie Communal Cemetery Extension. Son of Sarah Ann and the late Thomas Colman, of White Horse, Kettlestone, Fakenham. Enlisted 18th Jan., 1915.

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/21311/COLMAN,%20GEORGE

Corbie was about 20 kilometres behind the front when Commonwealth forces took over the line from Berles-au-Bois southward to the Somme in July 1915. The town immediately became a medical centre, with Nos 5 and 21 Casualty Clearing Stations based at La Neuville (the suburb across the Ancre) until October 1916 and April 1917 respectively.

http://www.cwgc.org/find-a-cemetery/cemetery/2201/CORBIE%20COMMUNAL%20CEMETERY%20EXTENSION

 

Picture: https://norfolk.spydus.co.uk/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/FULL/PICNOR/BIBENQ/15393034/2214593,1?FMT=IMG&IMGNUM=1

(Unit given as 9th and 10th Norfolks, from Kettlestone).

FindMyPast does not appear to have any WW1 Service Records for George, (so presumably lost in the Blitz).

Remembered locally on: Kettlestone War Memorial.

(No picture available on line)

1901 Census: Aged 7, born Kettlestone, living with widowed mother, Sarah Ann Colman, (43, Innkeeper, born Bungay, Suffolk) at the White Horse Inn, Kettlestone. 3 siblings and 4 step-siblings.

1911 Census: Aged 17, Groom at Rectory, living with widowed mother Sarah Ann, (53, Inn Keeper), at Kettlestone. Sarah’s marriage lasted 23 years and she had 6 children, of which 4 were then still alive.

This is a working assumption that George Colman died as a result of wounds received on the 15th as they may well have been incurred earlier.

 

 

(163) Harold Weston Curnick, Private 14249

SDGW: Killed in Action. Born St Arnold, Hertfordshire. Enlisted St Paul’s Churchyard, Middlesex. No place of residence

CWGC: Thiepval Memorial

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/758056/CURNICK,%20HAROLD%20WESTON

FindMyPast does not appear to have any WW1 Service Records for Harold, (so presumably lost in the Blitz).

Rememberd on: St Albans War Memorial.

http://www.roll-of-honour.com/Hertfordshire/StAlbansWW1.html

1901 Census: Aged 5, born St Albans, Hertfordshire, recorded living with parents Richard, (49, Drapers Porter, born St Albans, Herts) and Emily, (39, born Holt, Norfolk) at 21 Dalton Street, St.Albans, Hertfordshire. No siblings listed.

1911 Census: Aged 15, Drapers Apprentice, living with parents Richard, 58) and Emily, (48) at “Cranbrook”, Union Lane, St Albans, Herts.

I suspect Harold, like Wilfred Phelps, (see below), was one of those recorded missing on the 15th and at some point the date of the 16th has crept in to official record keeping.

 

 

(164) John Hudson, Lance Corporal 12258

SDGW: Died of Wounds. Born Horton, Middlesex. Enlisted London. No place of residence.

CWGC: Aged 24. Corbie Communal Cemetery Extension. Son of John and Eliza Hudson, of Finsbury.

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/21539/HUDSON,%20JOHN

Remembered at: St. Luke's Parochial School War Memorial (Islington, London).

http://bookofremembrance.islington.gov.uk/BookOfRemembrance/deceasedFolder.aspx?id=56545

FindMyPast does not appear to have any WW1 Service Records for John, (so presumably lost in the Blitz).

1901 Census, (most likely): Aged 9 born Shoreditch, living with widowed mother Eliza, (33, Fine Sewer, born Shoreditch), at 4W Guest Street, St Luke, London. One sibling.

Neither Eliza or John are obviously present on the 1911 census, and Eliza does not appear to have already married her husband prior to the 1891 census so doesn’t appear under that name.

This is a working assumption that John Hudson died as a result of wounds received on the 15th as they may well have been incurred earlier.

 

 

(165) Wilfred John Phelps, Lieutenant

SDGW: (As Wiffred John). Killed in Action.

CWGC: Aged 35. Thiepval Memorial. Son of Emma Phelps, of 10, Seward Terrace, Writhlington, Bath, and the late Henry Phelps.

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/1548004/PHELPS,%20WILFRED%20JOHN

Member Nottingham Union Rowing Club

Remembered on Hucknall – St Mary Magdalene War Memorial & Nottingham Rowing Clubs War Memorial.

http://www.nottinghamshire.gov.uk/rollofhonour/People/Details/32021

 

http://www.nottinghamshire.gov.uk/rollofhonour/WarMemorials/Details/165

 

http://www.nottinghamshire.gov.uk/rollofhonour/WarMemorials/Details/486

FindMyPast has him appearing on a South African Roll of Honour for the Great War.

The Battalion War Diary entry for the 15th records him as Missing.

1881 Census: Aged 2 months, born Hucknall, Nottinghamshire, living with parents Henry, (30, Tailor, born Hucknall, Notts) and Emma, (26, born Hucknall, Notts) at High Street, Hucknall, Notts. 2 siblings.

1891 Census: Aged 10, at School, living with family now at 3A Carlingford Road, Hucknall, with head of the household being widowed mother Emma, (35). Wilfred has 5 siblings listed.

1901 Census: Emma, (46) and three of her children are still at Carlingford Road, but there is no obvious trace of Wilfred in England, Scotland or Wales.

1911 Census: Emma, (56) and an unmarried daughter were now living at 193 Noel Street, Nottingham, but again there is no obvious match for Wilfred in England and Wales.

The 1917 Probate Calendar records a Wilfred John Phelps of 11 Carnarvon Road, West Bridgford. Nottinghamshire who died on or since 15th September 1916 in France. (My highlight). Administration was granted at the Gloucester Court to Emma Phelps, widow on the 9th November 1917.  His effects were valued at £310.

https://probatesearch.service.gov.uk/Calendar?surname=Phelps&yearOfDeath=1917&page=1#calendar

 

It may be a co-incidence but worth considering given the unknown South African connection – there is a record of a Trooper 20293 Wilfred Phelps who served with the 76th Company, 20th Battalion, Imperial Yeomanry and received the Queens South Africa Medal. The units took volunteers from the Territorial Yeomanry units, and usually had a connection to a specific area of the country – however in this case the 20th Battalion was drawn from London.

 

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17th September 1916*********************************

 

Battalion War Diary.

 

Trenches

Reorganising Battln. Supplied small working party to clear battlefield.

 

(166) Elvin Spencer Bulley, Lance Corporal 18164.

SDGW: Died of Wounds. Born Swafield, Norfolk. Enlisted Norwich. No place of residence.

CWGC: Aged 32, Guillemont Road Cemetery. Son of William and Rosanna Bulley, of Swafield, North Walsham.

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/534194/BULLEY,%20E%20S

 

Picture: http://facesofthefirstworldwar.tumblr.com/post/145553264310/elvin-bulley-elvin-bulley-from-norfolk-worked-as

Elvin Bulley, from Norfolk, worked as a moulder at Messrs Smithdale and Sons in Acle. He was captain of the Acle football team and a member of the local bowling club. 

Elvin enlisted shortly after war broke out and was fighting alongside his brother when he was fatally wounded

http://www.rememberingsomme.culture.gov.uk/

 

Remembered locally on: Acle War memorial.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/43688219@N00/4008380839/in/album-72157622462341457/

 

Eastern Daily Press, Thursday October 12th 1916

News has reached Acle of the death of Elwin Bulley, of the Norfolks, who was killed in action during last week. The deceased had been a resident in Acle for the past nine or ten years, and was a moulder at Messrs. Smithdale & Sons, Acle.. He was quite a favourite among the young fellows. He was captain of the Acle Football Team for several years, and was also a member of the Queen’s Head Bowling Club. Soon after war broke out he enlisted with several others of the parish. His brother was fighting beside him in the same trench and was wounded a few hours previously.

 

FindMyPast does not appear to have any WW1 Service Records for Elvin, (so presumably lost in the Blitz).

1885 Baptism: St Nicholas, Swafield on 11th January 1885. Said to have been born 25th October 1884. Parents William, a Blacksmith, and Rosanna Bulley. The family live at Swafield.

http://freereg2.freereg.org.uk/search_records/55106031e93790f8ad14619b?search_id=57f78a2ff4040b77391c8d2c

1891 Census (as Edwin Spencer Bulley): Aged 6, born Swafield, living with parents William, (54, Blacksmith, born Stalham) and Rosa, (44, born Thorpe St Andrew) at Swafield. 2 siblings.

1901 Census: No trace of either Elvin or his parents.

1911 Census (as Elvin Bulley): Aged 26, single, Iron Founder at a General Engineer, boarding at New Road, Acle.

 

Taking into account the information in the newspaper report, there must be a possibility that Elvin actually died on the 15th September and his body was subsequently recovered over the next few days\weeks by troops occupying the line. The date of death may well reflect that recovery.

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Re (139) Albert Edward Reece, Serjeant 14409

 

I don't know if this will help in your census searches but there is an In Memoriam notice in the South Wales Daily News 15 September 1917 for Sergeant Albert E Rees [sic]. His mother's address is given as 5 Maitland Street, Cardiff, late 132 Donald Street.

Donald Street is in the Roath district of Cardiff.

 

Gwyn

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Hi Peter,

 

Re (161) Arthur Coe. Serjeant 5261 

Soldiers' Effects confirms that he died at 34 CCS. His South Africa medal rolls appear to be:

Coe.jpg

 

Re (162) George Colman, Private 18246

Soldiers' Effects confirms that he died at 5 CCS.

 

Re (163) Harold Weston Curnick, Private 14249

On ‎07‎/‎10‎/‎2016 at 12:15, PRC said:

I suspect Harold, like Wilfred Phelps, (see below), was one of those recorded missing on the 15th and at some point the date of the 16th has crept in to official record keeping.

Soldiers' Effects records his death as being on 15th September. It names his aunt (Miss Mary E Lake) as his sole legatee

 

Re  (164) John Hudson, Lance Corporal 12258

Soldiers' Effects confirms that he died at 5 CCS. That record shows that his outstanding pay was paid to his mother, Eliza, in January 1917. However, the war gratuity was paid to his sister, Rosina Moffatt, in November 1919.

 

Re (166) Elvin Spencer Bulley, Lance Corporal 18164

Soldiers' Effects shows that he died with 9 Field Ambulance on the 17th.

 

Regards

Chris

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18th September 1916**********************************

 

Battalion War Diary.

 

Trenches

Stood to at 5 am. Supplied small working party to clear battlefield.

 

(167) Leslie A Palgrave, Private 14745

SDGW: Died of Wounds. Born St Saviours, Norwich. Enlisted Norwich. No place of residence.

CWGC: Bronfay Farm Military Cemetery.

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/535837/PALGRAVE,%20L%20A

 

It was used by Commonwealth troops from August 1915 to February 1917, particularly during the Battle of the Somme, when the XIV Corps Main Dressing station was at the farm.

http://www.cwgc.org/find-a-cemetery/cemetery/59800/BRONFAY%20FARM%20MILITARY%20CEMETERY,%20BRAY-SUR-SOMME

 

Picture: https://norfolk.spydus.co.uk/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/FULL/PICNOR/BIBENQ/15406904/2215400,9?FMT=IMG

Accompanying notes: Private Palgrave was born in Norwich on 8th October 1896, the son of Arthur Palgrave of Swanton Abbott. He enlisted in September 1914, and died of wounds on 18th September 1916.

 

Remembered locally on: Swanton Abbott War Memorial.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/43688219@N00/12618515353

FindMyPast does not appear to have any WW1 Service Records for Leslie, (so presumably lost in the Blitz).

1901 Census: Aged 4, born Norwich, living with his parents Arthur, (31 Inn Keeper and Carpenter, born Westwick) and Emma, (24, born Norwich) at Stake Bridge, Skeyton.

1911 Census: Aged 14, born Norwich, living with his uncle and aunt, Charles and Anna Palgrave, at Swanton Abbott. Parents Arthur and Emma were living at “Near Low Common”, Swanton Abbot. They had been married 14 years and have had 3 children, all then still alive.

 

 

(168) George Wilkin, Private 14508

SDGW: Died of Wounds. Born Necton, Norfolk. Enlisted Norwich. No place of residence.

CWGC: Aged 28. Grove Town Cemetery, Meaulte. Son of John and Sarah Ann Wilkin, of Station Rd., East Winch, King's Lynn, Norfolk.

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/31933/WILKIN,%20GEORGE

 

Remembered locally on: Ashwicken, Bawsey & Leziate War Memorial.

http://www.roll-of-honour.com/Norfolk/Ashwicken.html

 

Great Ellingham War Memorial.

http://www.roll-of-honour.com/Norfolk/GreatEllingham.html

FindMyPast does not appear to have any WW1 Service Records for George, (so presumably lost in the Blitz).

1891 Census: Aged 2, born Necton, living with parents John, (42, Agricultural Labourer, born Necton) and Sarah Ann, (39, born Lynn) at Church Lane, Necton. 5 siblings.

1901 Census: Aged 13, born Necton, living with parents at Wootton Road, Gaywood.

1911 Census: Aged 22, Labourer in Sand Pits, living with parents at Holt House Cottages, Leziate, Kings Lynn. John and Sarah Ann have been married 41 years, and have had 8 children of which 6 children were then still alive.

 

19th September 1916*****************************

 

Battalion War Diary.

 

Trenches

Moved back at 10 am. to VILLE SUR ANCRE got there about 5 pm. Billets.

 

(169) Fred Henry Howson, Serjeant 15655, “B” Company, Military Medal.

SDGW: Died of Wounds. Born Easton, Norfolk. Enlisted Norwich. No place of residence.

CWGC: Aged 26. St Pierre Cemetery, Amiens. Son of George and Sarah Howson, of Trowse, Norwich, Norfolk.

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/204901/HOWSON,%20F%20H

 

The 7th General Hospital was at Amiens in August 1914; the 56th (South Midland) Casualty Clearing Station from April to July 1916; the New Zealand Stationary Hospital from July 1916 to May 1917; the 42nd Stationary Hospital from October 1917 to March 1919; and the 41st Stationary Hospital in March 1918, and again in December 1918 and January 1919.

http://www.cwgc.org/find-a-cemetery/cemetery/20902/ST.%20PIERRE%20CEMETERY,%20AMIENS

 

Picture: https://livesofthefirstworldwar.org/lifestory/1994405

Born: 27th January 1890

Sustained Gunshot Wound to right arm during the attack on the Quadrilateral, according to the same source.

FindMyPast does not appear to have any WW1 Service Records for Fred, (so presumably lost in the Blitz).

 

Remembered locally on: Trowse War memorial, (as Frederick Henry).

http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/4773922

1891 Census: Aged 1, born Easton, living with parents George, (45, Shepherd, born Buckland, Berkshire) and Sarah, (40, born Bressingham), at Marlingford Road, Easton. 6 siblings.

1901 Census: Aged 11, at school, living with parents near Crown Point, Trowse. Father George (55), now describes himself as a Shepherd – Exhibition Purposes.

1911 Census, (transcribed as “Dowson” on the Genealogy source I use): Aged 21, a School Teacher with the County Council, recorded boarding at Bexwell Road, Downham Market, the household of a Mr & Mrs Moore. His parents were recorded living at The Hythe, Whitlingham Lane, Trowse. Married 37 years, the couple have had 7 children, all then still alive.

 

 

(170) Edward Charles Stone, Private 15473

SDGW: Died of Wounds. Born Hevingham, Norfolk. Enlisted Norwich. No place of residence.

CWGC: St Pierre Cemetery, Amiens. Son of Mrs. E. J. Stone, of 8, Denbigh St., Norwich.

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/205170/STONE,%20E%20C

 

Almost all of the hospitals at Rouen remained there for practically the whole of the war. They included eight general, five stationary, one British Red Cross, one labour hospital, and No. 2 Convalescent Depot. A number of the dead from these hospitals were buried in other cemeteries, but the great majority were taken to the city cemetery of St. Sever. In September 1916, it was found necessary to begin an extension.

http://www.cwgc.org/find-a-cemetery/cemetery/16900/ST.%20SEVER%20CEMETERY,%20ROUEN

 

Remembered locally on: Hellesdon War Memorial.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/43688219@N00/7424237790

 

Parts of Edwards’ Service Records do survive. He attested on the 8th day of September, 1914 and the form shows his date of birth as the 8th March 1895 and place of birth as Hevingham. His Trade or calling is shown as Gardener. He was 5 feet 8 inches tall, weighed 120lbs, had a fresh complexion with brown eyes and brown hair. His home address details are partially burnt, but the first line is “Near the Golf Links”. He was posted to the 9th Battalion on the 12th September 1914. He was in France from the 30th August 1915.His next of kin are shown as father James Stone, mother Helen Stone and brother Herbert Stone. The Company Conduct Sheet puts him in “D” Company – no offences are recorded. His Casualty Form records him as wounded on the 15th September 1916 and his cause of death is given as Gun Shot Wound Right Buttock. He died in the 3rd St.Hptl, (3rd Stationary Hospital?).

 

His mother signs for his medals in the 1920’s as Ellen J.Stone.The address for sending on personal effects in 1917, (there were none), was Mrs Ellen Jane Stone, Lower Hellesdon, Norwich.

 

Postwar the Government awarded a War Gratuity to all those who served overseas . In the case of the deceased they sent out form W5080 to the next of kin to set out surviving relatives in line with the current inheritance laws.  Edwards’ father was dead, and mother was Ellen J Stone of 8 Denbigh Road, Norwich. His brother Herbert was also still alive, as were sisters Mrs Daisy Rose, Mrs Ethel Weston, Maud Stone, Phebe Stone, Mrs Alice Coddling, Freda Stone and Algline(?) Stone. No addresses or ages were given for any of them.

The baptism of Edward Charles Stone, born 8th March 1896, took place at St Botolph, Hevingham on the 4th June 1896. Parents were James, a Labourer and Ellen.

1901 Census: Aged 5, born Hevingham, living at Westgate, Hevingham, Parents James, (43, Agricultural Labourer born Hevingham) and Ellen, (34, Horse Hair Weaver from Guestwick). 4 siblings.

1911 Census: Aged 15, Farm Labourer, living with parents at Fir Cottage, 2 Middletons Lane, Upper Hellesdon. James, (52) and Ellen, (40), have been married 21 years and have had 10 children, of which 9 were then still alive.

 

Eastern Daily Press, October 5th 1916

 

Died of Wounds

STONE, September 19 – from wounds received in action, Private Edward C.Stone, Norfolk Regiment, eldest son of Ellen Stone, of Lower Hellesdon, aged 20 years.

They miss him most, who loved him best.

 

 

(171) William Henry Walpole, Lance Corporal 14896

SDGW: Died of Wounds. Born N.Heigham, Norfolk. Enlisted Norwich. No place of residence.

CWGC: St Sever Cemetery, Rouen.

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/172746/WALPOLE,%20W%20H

 

Almost all of the hospitals at Rouen remained there for practically the whole of the war. They included eight general, five stationary, one British Red Cross, one labour hospital, and No. 2 Convalescent Depot. A number of the dead from these hospitals were buried in other cemeteries, but the great majority were taken to the city cemetery of St. Sever. In September 1916, it was found necessary to begin an extension.

http://www.cwgc.org/find-a-cemetery/cemetery/16900/ST.%20SEVER%20CEMETERY,%20ROUEN

Remembered locally on:

At the start of the 1920’s the Eastern Daily Press and Jarrolds Printers published a booklet listing all the names that were listed on the newly unveiled War Memorials. A William Walpole was remembered on the one at St Bartholomew, Heigham, Norwich. That church might well have been attended by a family living at Armes Street. Unfortunately the church was destroyed in WW2 in an air raid – only the tower remains in a park fashioned from the churchyard.

 

Parts of Williams’ Service Records do survive. He attested on the 7th September 1914 and his date of birth is given as 25th August 1895 in the Parish of North Heigham, Norwich. His Trade or calling is listed as French Polisher. He was 5 feet 8 and a quarter inches tall and weighed 116lbs. He was posted to the 9th Battalion on the 12th September 1914 and appointed (Temporary) Lance Corporal on the 4th September 1915. His Company Conduct Sheet puts him in “C” Company – no offences are listed.His Casualty Form shows him wounded on the 15th September 1916. Admitted to the 10 G.H. on the 17th September 1916 with a Gun Shot Wound Right Groin he was deemed dangerously ill and a Telegram was sent to his next of kin – hence probably the date given in the newspaper announcement below.

This injury is given as his cause of death on the 19th September at 2.40 am.

 

At the time of enlistment his next of kin are given as his father “Wm. Geo” Walpole, his mother Caroline Walpole and his four brothers and three sisters – all living at 180 Armes Street. His medals are signed for in the 1920’s by a W.G.Walpole. In 1917 his personal effects were sent to Mr. William G.Walpole, 180 Armes Street, North Heigham, Norwich.

 

1901 Census: Aged 4, born Norwich, recorded living with his parents, William G, (25, French Polisher, born Norwich) and Caroline, (25, born Pakefield, Suffolk) at 180 Armes Street, Norwich. 2 siblings.

1911 Census: William, aged 14 and a French Polishers’ Apprentice, was still living at 180 Armes Street with his family. Parents William, (35) and Caroline, (35), have been married 14 years and have had 6 children, all then still alive.

 

Eastern Daily Press, Tuesday September 26th 1916 Births, Deaths and Marriages column.

 

Died of Wounds

WALPOLE – September 19, from wounds received on 17th September, Lance Corporal William H.Walpole, Norfolk Regiment, the eldest and dearly loved son of Mr and Mrs William Walpole, of 180, Armes Street, Norwich, aged 26(?) years.

He died for his king and country.

From Father, Mother, Sisters and Brothers.

 

20th September 1916************************************

 

Battalion War Diary.

 

Trenches

Reorganising Battln. A working party of 170 O.R. + 1 Sergt went to MERICOURT L’ABBEY to be billeted there. Clothing + equipment issued. Battn payed out. Battn working party returned as heard we were moving again.

 

(172) Ernest Weavers, Private 14503

SDGW: Died of Wounds. Born Diss, Norfolk. Enlisted Norwich. No place of residence.

CWGC: St Sever Cemetery, Rouen.

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/172795/WEAVERS,%20E

 

Remembered locally on: Diss War Memorial.

http://www.roll-of-honour.com/Norfolk/Diss.html

 

Diss Secondary School War Memorial

http://www.roll-of-honour.com/Norfolk/DissSecondarySchool.html

FindMyPast does not appear to have any WW1 Service Records for Ernest, (so presumably lost in the Blitz).

1901 Census: No obvious match.

1911 Census: Aged 17, born Diss and a Boot Maker, was recorded as a Boarder as 3 Beehive Cottages, Diss. This was the household of the widowed “Susaner” Weavers, aged 60 and born Bacton, Suffolk.

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On ‎08‎/‎10‎/‎2016 at 11:46, Aneurin said:

Re (139) Albert Edward Reece, Serjeant 14409

 

I don't know if this will help in your census searches but there is an In Memoriam notice in the South Wales Daily News 15 September 1917 for Sergeant Albert E Rees [sic]. His mother's address is given as 5 Maitland Street, Cardiff, late 132 Donald Street.

Donald Street is in the Roath district of Cardiff.

 

Gwyn

Gwyn,

 

I think that may be a very big help indeed and brings up a very intriguing possibility – a family link to Norfolk .

 

On the 1911 Census there is a 64 year old widow, Susannah Clark Rees, born Yarmouth, Norfolk, recorded as the head of the household at 132 Donald Street, Roath Park, Cardiff. She states she was married 41 years and has had 6 children, 5 of which were then still alive. Only one of those children was still living with her, a 23 year old single man, Albert Edward Rees, a Baker from Bridgend, Glamorganshire.

 

Going back through the earlier censuses:-

1901 Census: Susannah Rees, (52, widow,shown as born Bridgend) and Albert Jas, (15, Errand Boy, born Bridgend), were recorded living at 42 Wyndham Street, Canton, Cardiff. There is another son Ernest Jas, (21), living with them.

 

1891 Census has Susannah C Rees, (43, born Great Yarmouth), recorded living with her husband, Samuel M, (38, Monumental Mason, born Bridgend (?), Glamorganshire and children William, (16, Monumental Masons’ Apprentice, born Bridgend, Glamorganshire), Ernest J, (10), Olive M, (5), Albert E, (3) and a boarder at 41, Brackla Street, Bridgend.

 

1881 Susannah C and Samuel Rees were already living at 41, Brackla Street. Susannah was born Great Yarmouth. They had 4 children, Fred J R, (8), William H, (6), Edgar J., (5) and Ernest J., (6 months) living with them.

 

The most likely marriage is that of a Samuel Rees and Susannah Clarke Boulter which was recorded in the Bridgend, Glamorganshire District in the October to December quarter, (Q4), of 1873.

 

Where Reece came from as a surname for now remains a mystery.

 

Thanks for your help,

Peter

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Hi Peter,

 

Their respective Soldiers' Effects records show that:

 

(167) Leslie A Palgrave, Private 14745 died at 14th Corps Main Dressing Station

(168) George Wilkin, Private 14508 died at 2/2nd London CCS

(169) Fred Henry Howson, Serjeant 15655 died at 1 New Zealand Stationary Hospital

(170) Edward Charles Stone, Private 15473  died at 1 New Zealand Stationary Hospital

(171) William Henry Walpole, Lance Corporal 14896 died at 10 General Hospital.

(172) Ernest Weavers, Private 14503 died at 10 General Hospital. Outstanding pay and war gratuity paid to grandmother, Mrs Susannah Weavers

 

Regards

Chris

 

 

 

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4 hours ago, clk said:

Hi Peter,

 

Their respective Soldiers' Effects records show that:

 

(167) Leslie A Palgrave, Private 14745 died at 14th Corps Main Dressing Station

(168) George Wilkin, Private 14508 died at 2/2nd London CCS

(169) Fred Henry Howson, Serjeant 15655 died at 1 New Zealand Stationary Hospital

(170) Edward Charles Stone, Private 15473  died at 1 New Zealand Stationary Hospital

(171) William Henry Walpole, Lance Corporal 14896 died at 10 General Hospital.

(172) Ernest Weavers, Private 14503 died at 10 General Hospital. Outstanding pay and war gratuity paid to grandmother, Mrs Susannah Weavers

 

Regards

Chris

 

Thanks Chris,

 

Its great how the details can come together on a project like this. it's probably going to start getting more contentious as the deaths start occurring more than a week after the action so any help will be much appreciated,

 

regards,

Peter

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21st September 1916************************************

 

Battalion War Diary.

 

Trenches

Lt.C Upcher attended Court of Inquiry at Sherwoods H.Q at 10 am re Lt.Col. Bradshaws wound. A draft of 32 O.R. joined Battn, the majority of them being returned woundeds.

 

Midday moved up to Sandpit area. Draft of 94 arrived during the evening.

 

(173) Robert Carver, Private 14891

SDGW: Killed in Action. Born Mulbarton, Norfolk. Enlisted Norwich. No place of residence.

CWGC: St Sever Cemetery, Rouen.

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/514209/CARVER,%20R

 

Remembered locally on: Mulbarton Roll of Honour.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/43688219@N00/2352057038

 

Parts of Roberts’ Service Records do survive. He attested on the 5th September 1914. On his attestation form his date of birth is given  as 15th February 1895 and his place of birth as Mulbarton. He worked as an Agricultural Farm Servant.  At his Medical he was 5 feet 7 and three-eights tall, and weighed 135lbs. His Company Conduct Sheet places him in “C” Company. There are a couple of misdemeanours on his record. His service history initially notes him as Killed in Action on the 15th September 1916, but this has subsequently been crossed through and changed to the 21st September. However there is correspondence in the file unravelling the confusion between Robert Carver and an unrelated Richard Carver, a 9th Battalion man who did die on the 15th and is recorded as Killed in Action. It seems the paperwork following the action referred to them both as R.Carver and got mixed up.

 

A Telegraph slip in the file notifies the death of Robert on the 21st September 1916 at 8.25 pm at the 11 St. Hospital, Rouen, as a result of Gun Shot Wound to Left Buttock.

 

His next of kin was his father, William Carver, his mother, Rachael Carver, a sister Violet and a brother, all living at Mulbarton.

 

1901 Census: Aged 5, born Swainsthorpe, staying with Grand-parents John Carver, (64, Farm Labourer, born Catton) and Harriet Carver, (55, born Swardeston) at Scotts Terrace, Norwich Road, Mulbarton.  As well as 4 children of their own living with them, (all unmarried), there are also two other grand-children – Bertie, (10) and Martha (1) – both born Swainsthorpe.

1911 Census: Aged 15, Farm Labourer still living with grand-parents John and Harriet Carver at Scotts’ Terrace. The couple have been married 48 years and have had 10 children, of which 7 were still alive. Checking the grand-children from the 1901 census, Bertie, (20), was also still living with them, but Martha Carver wasn’t. A search for her on the 1911 census produces just one likely match – an 11 year old Martha Carver, born Swainsthorpe, who was recorded living with her mother and step-father, Ann and William Kedge at “Braconash.”, (or possibly adoptive parents).  Ann, (33, East Carleton) and William, (33, Labourer on Farm, born Mulbarton), have been married 10 years and the marriage has produced 4 children, all then still alive. Just to add to the confusion, while the couple have children aged 10, 5 and 3 with the surname Kedge, they also have a 7 year old daughter, Violet Carver, born Swainsthorpe.

 

Going back to the 1901 Census, the 24 year old William Kedge and the 22 year old Mary Ann Kedge, a married couple, were recorded living together at The  Street, Baconash, with their 11 month old daughter Violet May.

 

 

(174) Harry Samuel Hayes, Lance Corporal 14389

SDGW: Died of Wounds. Born Bramerton, Norfolk. Enlisted Norwich. No place of residence.

CWGC: Aged 26. Grove Town Cemetery, Meaulte. Son of John and Mary Jane Hayes, of Bramerton, Norfolk.

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/31180/HAYES,%20H%20S

 

Picture: https://norfolk.spydus.co.uk/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/FULL/PICNOR/BIBENQ/15616135/2214841,1?FMT=IMG&IMGNUM=1

Accompanying notes: Born at Bramerton, 28 Feb 1890. Educated at Kirby Bedon. Enlisted 8 Sept 1914. Died of wounds received in action 21 Sept 1916..

 

Remembered locally at: Bramerton War Memorial.

http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/4493373

FindMyPast does not appear to have any WW1 Service Records for Harry, (so presumably lost in the Blitz).

The baptism of Harry Samuel Hayes, born 28th February 1890, took place at St Peter, Bramerton, on the 20th April 1890. Parents were John, a Gardener, and Mary Jane. The family live at Bramerton.

http://freereg2.freereg.org.uk/search_records/55107e18e937900ae84a53fd?search_id=57fc15b933045b1de9820edc

1891 Census: Aged 1, born Bramerton, recorded living with his parents John, (31, Gardener, born Bramerton) and Mary J, (28, born Bramerton) at The Street, Bramerton. 4 Siblings.

1901 Census: Aged 11, recorded living at the junction of Norwich Road and Bramerton Street with his parents.

1911 Census: Aged 21, Farm Labourer, still living at Bramerton Street, Bramerton with parents John, (51, Market Gardener) and Mary Jane, (48). The couple have been married for 29 years and have had 11 children, of which 9 were then still alive.

 

Eastern Daily Press, Friday October 13th 1916

News has been received at Bramerton of the death of Lance-Corporal Harry S.Hayes, of the Norfolks, on the 21st September, from wounds in action. On Tuesday a memorial service was held in the Parish Church and many parishioners were present to show their last respect to this brave young soldier. The service was conducted by the Rev. E.H.Kinder (illegible) of Kirby Bedon. Harry Hayes was 35 years of age, and was the third son of Mr and Mrs John Hayes, of Bramerton. He joined Lord Kitchener’s Army with three of his brothers at the outbreak of war, and had been at the front thirteen months. He was very popular.

 

 

(175) Arthur Edward Mobbs, Private 16471

SDGW: Died of Wounds. Born Westacre, Norfolk. Enlisted Norwich. No place of residence.

CWGC: Aged 20. Etaples Military Cemetery.

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/504110/MOBBS,%20ARTHUR%20EDWARD

 

During the First World War, the area around Etaples was the scene of immense concentrations of Commonwealth reinforcement camps and hospitals. It was remote from attack, except from aircraft, and accessible by railway from both the northern or the southern battlefields. In 1917, 100,000 troops were camped among the sand dunes and the hospitals, which included eleven general, one stationary, four Red Cross hospitals and a convalescent depot, could deal with 22,000 wounded or sick.

http://www.cwgc.org/find-a-cemetery/cemetery/56500/ETAPLES%20MILITARY%20CEMETERY

 

Remembered locally on: (Possibly) Oxburgh War Memorial.

http://www.roll-of-honour.com/Norfolk/Oxborough.html

FindMyPast does not appear to have any WW1 Service Records for Arthur, (so presumably lost in the Blitz).

1901 Census: Aged 4, born West Acre, recorded living with his parents Robert, (42, Teamster on Farm, born Pentney) and Emily, (40, born Litcham) at a dwelling near Corbetts Lodge, Necton.  6 siblings.

1911 Census: Aged 14, Farm Labourer, living with parents Robert, (51) and Emily, (49) at Oxborough, Stoke Ferry. The couple have been married 29 years and have had 11 children, of which 10 were then still alive.

 

 

(176) Alfred Edward Turner, Private 15323.

SDGW: Died of Wounds. Born Rollesby, Norfolk. Enlisted Norwich. No place of residence.

CWGC: Aged 30. Grove Town Cemetery, Meaulte. Son of John and Elizabeth Turner, of Walcot, Norfolk; husband of Mrs. N. Turner, of Colby, Long Rd., Aylsham, Norfolk.

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/31860/TURNER,%20ALFRED%20EDWARD

 

Remembered locally on: Colby War Memorial

http://www.roll-of-honour.com/Norfolk/Colby.html

FindMyPast does not appear to have any WW1 Service Records for Alfred, (so presumably lost in the Blitz).

The baptism of Alfred Edward Turner, born 10th October 1885, took place at St George, Rollesby on the 15th November 1885. Parents were John, a Gardener at

Rollesby Hall, and Elizabeth. The family live at Rollesby.

http://freereg2.freereg.org.uk/search_records/551077dfe93790f8ad40bb99?search_id=57fc14fd33045b1e4b820e50

1891 Census: Aged 5, born Rollesby, recorded living with parents John, (31, Domestic Coachman, born Rollesby) and Elizabeth, (36, born Blofield) at Hall Lodge. Martham Road, Rollesby.

1901 Census: Aged 15, Hay Trusser, recorded living with his parents John, (44) and Elizabeth, (45, born Rollesby) at Bell Yard, White Street, Martham.

1911 Census: Aged 25,  Single, and boarding at Station Road, Overstrand with a Mr and Mrs Rix. Mr Rix worked on the railways like Alfred, (a Porter). His parents John, (52, Groom) and Elizabeth, (55), were recorded living at Walcott. The couple have been married 30 years and have had 6 children, all then still alive.

With a relatively common name like Alfred Turner, identiftying a marriage between the start of April 1911, (when the census was taken) and September 1916, (when he died) was never going to be easy. Assuming the marriage took place in Norfolk, (and that is a large assumption) then there are two potential Alfred E’s records, but only one married a wife with a first name beginning with the letter ‘N’. This occurred when an Alfred E Turner married a Nora Wood in the Smallburgh District in the April to June quarter, (Q2), of 1916.

 

 

22nd September 1916************************************

 

Battalion War Diary.

 

Morning passed in study (or steady?) drill and re-equipping new drafts with helmets etc. afternoon ditto.

 

No deaths with a 9th Battalion connection identified from CWGC.

 

23rd September 1916************************************

 

Battalion War Diary.

 

Morning – Brigade practice attacks on old trenches close to camp.

Afternoon parades under Coys

 

No deaths with a 9th Battalion connection identified from CWGC.

 

24th September 1916************************************

 

Battalion War Diary.

 

Morning issuing battle equipment. Midday moved up to bivouac N of Carnoy

 

No deaths with a 9th Battalion connection identified from CWGC.

 

25th September 1916************************************

 

Battalion War Diary.

 

Early morning moved into bivouac near Bernafay Wood. 71st IB in reserve to Division where Bn remained all day. Drafts of 23 OR arrived in the evening from 3rd Bn – all men is (or w?) only 3 months service.

 

(177) Albert Cherry,  Private 14844

SDGW, (as Albert): Died of Wounds. Born Welwyn, Herts, no place of residence, enlisted Hitchin, Herts.

CWGC: Grove Town Cemetery, Meaulte.

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/30815/

 

Remembered on: (Probably) Old Knebworth War Memorial.

http://www.iwm.org.uk/memorials/names/listing/3813?items_per_page=10&page=1

 

FindMyPast does not appear to have any WW1 Service Records for Albert, (so presumably lost in the Blitz).

Possible.

1901 Census (as Albert E): Aged 5, born Codicote, Hertfordshire and who was living with parents Edward, (52, born Shephall, Hertfordshire, Engine Driver on Farm) and Charlotte, (50, born Woolmersgreen, Hertfordshire) at Woolmersgreen, Welwyn, Hertfordshire. 2 siblings.

1911 Census (as Albert Edward): Aged 15, Painter, now living with widower father Edward, (61, Roadman for the County Council) and 2 sisters at Rose Cottage, Pondcroft Road, Knebworth Station, Stevenage, Hertfordshire.

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Hi Peter,

 

Re (172) Ernest Weavers, Private 14503

 

On ‎10‎/‎10‎/‎2016 at 14:12, PRC said:

1911 Census: Aged 17, born Diss and a Boot Maker, was recorded as a Boarder as 3 Beehive Cottages, Diss. This was the household of the widowed “Susaner” Weavers, aged 60 and born Bacton, Suffolk.

 

On ‎10‎/‎10‎/‎2016 at 15:42, clk said:

...Outstanding pay and war gratuity paid to grandmother, Mrs Susannah Weavers

 

Following Susaner/Susanna/Susannah back through the census returns (as per the 1911 census showing 6 children, 5 living) it appears that she was married to a Joseph Weavers with children Robert H, Agnes, Mary, Joseph, Adelade, and Lydia.

 

Given how old Ernest was in the 1911 census, and the address I think that the following extract from the Diss Parish Register would be a strong candidate for him.

Weavers.jpg

 

Re (173) Robert Carver, Private 14891

The confusion over Robert/Richard is also reflected in the Soldiers' Effects record: 

Carver.jpg

 

It's interesting to note that the place of his death appears to be at odds with that shown by the telegraph slip in his service record. Given the place of his burial I think that his death at 4 General Hospital is unlikely - see the LLT here. The amount of war gratuity paid is indicative of service counting from circa September 1914.

 

 

Respective Soldiers' Effects records show:

(174) Harry Samuel Hayes, Lance Corporal 14389 died at 2/2nd London CCS. Service counted from circa September 1914. Medal rolls indicate that he only served In active theatre with the 9th Battalion, first arriving in France on 30th August 1915.

(175) Arthur Edward Mobbs, Private 16471 died 4 General Hospital. Service counted from circa September 1914. Medal rolls indicate that he only served In active theatre with the 9th Battalion, first arriving in France on 30th August 1915.

(176) Alfred Edward Turner, Private 15323 died at 2/2nd London CCS. Service counted from circa September 1914. Medal rolls indicate that he only served In active theatre with the 9th Battalion, first arriving in France on 30th August 1915.

(177) Albert Cherry,  Private 14844 died at 34 CCS. Service counted from circa September 1914. Medal rolls indicate that he only served In active theatre with the 9th Battalion, first arriving in France on 30th August 1915.

 

Regards

Chris.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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26th September 1916************************************

 

Battalion War Diary.

 

Evening of 26th moved up to shelter trenches N.E. of Guinchy, everything very quiet.

 

George Cyril Smith, Private 15127

SDGW: Died of Wounds. Born Northrepps, enlisted Norwich.

CWGC: St Sever Cemetery, Rouen. Aged 26. Son of John H. Smith, of 13, Goldsmith St., Norwich. Native of Cromer, Norfolk.

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/172435/

 

His brother Sydney Arthur died on the 15th – see (146) above.

 

Both remembered locally on: Cromer War memorial.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/43688219@N00/8705471202/in/album-72157633167776336/

 

Parts of Georges’ Service Records do survive.

 

George Cyril Smith, born 6th November 1889 at Northrepps, attested on the 11th September 1914. At that time he was unmarried and a Postman. He had no previous military experience.

At his medical he was given as 24 years and 307 days, was 5 feet 4 inches tall, weighed 123lbs, was of a fresh complexion with Blue eyes and Brown hair.

 

He was posted to the 9th Battalion on the 12th September 1914 and was appointed paid Lance Corporal on the 1st December 1915.He had arrived in France on the 30th August 1915. His Company Conduct Sheet shows him in “A” Company.

 

On the morning of the 22nd January 1916 Lance Corporal G C Smith was in charge of instructing a group of men in the use of rifle grenades when one exploded prematurely as it left the rifle, causing injuries.

 

On the 11th February 1916 he received a shell wound, Right Thigh and was admitted to 20 Casualy Clearing Station the next day, being quickly moved on to a (Australian?) Hospital at Wimereux. By the 2nd of March he was well enough to be discharged to the 24th Infantry Base Depot and on the 17th March he returned to the Battalion.

 

On the 1st July 1916 he reverted back to Private at his own request.On the same day he was admitted to a Field Ambulance with some form of foot problem, (possibly J.C.T. Heel) which required a couple of days in hospital.

 

On the 15th September 1916 he was admitted to 14 C.M.D.S with Gun Shot Wounds to Thigh and Scrotum. At the time of his death on the 26th September from those same wounds he was at the 10th General Hospital at Rouen.

 

In February 1917 the name and address for any personal affects to be sent to was Mr John H Smith, Chesterfield Cottages, Cromer.

 

When form W5080 was returned post war by his next of kin in order to claim the War Gratuity, his father John Henry Smith, of 13 Goldsmith Street, Norwich, has either ignored the instruction to only include living relatives or has written his answers in a mis-leading way. While he confirms that there is no wife or children, the address for his own wife, S A Smith, is given as, (possibly) “Decid”.  The address for his own 24 year old son, Sidney Arthur Smith, appears to be either “Dee” or “Dec”. He has two daughters, Frances Margaret Patey(? – tbc) of Northrepps and Ethel Vic??? Tyce(?-tbc) of Cromer.

(Elsewhere in his Army records his next of kin at the time of enlistment were:-

Father: John Smith, 2 Brook Street, Cromer.

Brother: Sydney Smith, Norfolk Regiment

Sister: “Francis” Pooley, Church Street, Northrepps.)

 

Baptism: The baptism of George Cyril, no date of birth recorded, took place at St Mary the Virgin, Northrepps on the 23rd February 1890. Parents are John Henry, a Labourer and Sarah Anna.

http://freereg2.freereg.org.uk/search_records/5510befce93790ccb69c28c8?search_id=57fe77f4f493fd244272298d

1901 Census: Aged 11, born Northrepps, recorded living with parents John, (41, a General Labourer, born Northrepps) and Sarah, (38, born Southrepps) at Frogs Yard, Northrepps. 2 Siblings, (Frances and Sidney).

1911 Census: Aged 21, Footman  at Necton Hall, Necton, Swaffham, Norfolk.

 

27th September 1916************************************

 

Battalion War Diary.

 

Remained all day. Working parties 100 clearing Morval Quarry dump at night also T.M. carrying party of 25

 

No deaths with a 9th Battalion connection identified from CWGC.

 

28th September 1916************************************

 

Battalion War Diary.

 

Moved up to reserve trenches at night in T.8.d (57.C.8W). Working party 300 OR at night digging new communication trench thro’ Les Boeufs. Party heavily shelled – 9 casualties.

 

No deaths with a 9th Battalion connection identified from CWGC.

 

29th September 1916************************************

 

Battalion War Diary.

 

All day spent in salvaging equipment from battlefield. At night same working party as on 28th. No casualties on this party.

 

Arthur James Lake, Private 17404

SDGW: Died. Born Cromer, enlisted Norwich, no place of residence.

CWGC: Aged 23, St Sever Cemetery, Rouen. Only son of James and Maria Lake, of Cromer.

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/515331/LAKE,%20ARTHUR%20JAMES

FindMyPast does not appear to have any WW1 Service Records for Arthur, (so presumably lost in the Blitz).

Given that he is shown as Died on SDGW and the Battalion is known to have suffered casualties on the previous day and there are no service records, for now I’m erring on the side that Arthur did not die as a result of the action on the 15th.

1901 Census, (as Arthur J) : Aged 7, born Cromer, living with parents James, (43, Bricklayer, born Brumstead) and Maria, (44, born Cromer), at 4 Cross Street, Cromer with 1 sibling and Maria’s mother Harriet Davis, (widow, 73, born Cromer).

1911 Census, (as Arthur): Aged 18, Bakers Labourer from Cromer, boarding at 166 Ber Street, Norwich.

Neither James or Maria appear to be on the 1911 census. The death of a Maria Lake, aged 50 was recorded in the Erpingham Civil District, (which includes Cromer), in the April to June quarter, (Q2) of 1907. There are at least 2 James Lake’s of the right age who died in Norfolk between 1901 and 1911, although neither were in the Erpingham District.

Arthur is not on the Cromer War Memorial

 

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Hi Peter,

 

I hope you don't mind if I continue to comment on your sterling work. Please do say if you do, and I'll butt out.

 

Re George Cyril Smith, Private 15127

1 hour ago, PRC said:

On the 1st July 1916 he reverted back to Private at his own request. On the same day he was admitted to a Field Ambulance with some form of foot problem, (possibly J.C.T. Heel) which required a couple of days in hospital.

 

J.C.T is probably  I.C.T - "inflamed" or "inter" connective tissue

 

1 hour ago, PRC said:

At the time of his death on the 26th September from those same wounds he was at the 10th General Hospital at Rouen.

I read it as he died at 6 General Hospital.

Smith.jpg

 

Size of war gratuity indicates service counted from circa September 1914

 

Re Arthur James Lake, Private 17404

2 hours ago, PRC said:

29th September 1916************************************ 

 

...Given that he is shown as Died on SDGW and the Battalion is known to have suffered casualties on the previous day and there are no service records, for now I’m erring on the side that Arthur did not die as a result of the action on the 15th....

 

 

Soldiers' Effects records that he died on 29th September 1916 at 25 General Hospital, Rouen. So most likely he was wounded at least a few days prior. His outstanding pay/war gratuity was paid to his sister Edith C Sarsby. The amount of the gratuity indicates that service counted from circa December 1914.

 

Regards

Chris

 

 

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