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Terms of Service


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Can anyone help me understand the terms of service for William Wallace 27982 RFA?

 

He sign up on 18 Nov 1902

He transferred to the Reserves on 17 Nov 1910 after 8 yrs service.

 

On the attached document it says his ToS was 3+9 yrs.

 

On the 20 Nov 1915 he was sent to England for discharge on termination of engagement.

 

Does this mean he extended his service in Nov 1914, If so why is the ToS not 4+8yrs?

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For a period they changed the standard enlistment terms to 3&9 to try and get more in to the reserves faster than the 7&5 service allowed. There were various options available over the later years to extend and decrease the colour part of the enlistment for serving soldiers.

Part of the standard enlistment terms (and the same for Territorial Force) was that on declaration of War your service was automatically extended by a period 1 year before you could be discharged (if you were due to become time-expired). He became time-expired Nov 14 which meant that his service was extended to Nov 15 before he became eligible for discharge.

Craig

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2 hours ago, Muerrisch said:

The army had to respond to wars and the consequences of wars. Part of this was by adjusting Terms. In addition to the attached table, from time to time soldiers were offered an early bath [with inducement to go to the reserve but not reduce their total contract] or the opportunity to extend their service. A man due to do 9 and 3 who was offered a chance to go at 8 years would spend 4 years on the reserve therefore. If he was still a reservist in August 1914 he would be called to the colours and held to serve his extra 13th year. This "extra year for King George" also caught a fair number of soldiers in peace-time who, for one reason or another "missed the boat" back to UK from India [or colony] on their due date.

 

My tabulation is for regular line infantry only.

 

TERMS of Engagement, Line Infantry [not necessarily complete] 1806 to 1947

 

 

 

Year

 

Terms

 

Source

 

 

 

1806 until 1829

 

Life, or ‘limited service’, of seven years with up to two of seven year extensions up to 21 years

 

Bulletin MHS No.237, Philip Haythornthwaite

 

1837 at least

 

For life or until medical discharge  but end service by purchase up to 7 years £20, thereafter sliding scale to 14 years £5, thereafter free, with pay enhancements for “distinguishing marks” ie. Good Conduct badges.

 

KR 1837 and The Victorian Army at Home (VAH)

 

1847

 

10* years, re-engage to 21 years for pension

 

VAH * or 11

 

1870

 

12 years, but normally split 6 years colours and 6 years reserve

 

VAH

 

1870

 

6 years colours and 6 years reserve

 

The Late Victorian Army

 

1873

 

6 years colours and 6 years on reserve or 12 years and no reserve … one or the other

 

Through the Ranks to a Commission

 

1881

 

7 years colours and 5 years on reserve

 

VAH

 

1902 May

 

3 years colours and 9 on reserve.

 

Army Orders (AO) 117/02

 

1902 Jul

 

Extensions for those on 3 years or 7 years initial engagement, can extend to 8 years or 12 years

 

AO 159/02

 

1904

 

Proposed, not implemented: a ‘2 years with colours plus 6 years reserve’ engagement for Home, or ‘ 9 years with colours plus 3 year reserve’ for general service

 

The Development of the British Army

 

1904 Nov

 

Terms of service 9 years with colours and 3 years reserve

 

AO 189/04

 

1905

 

2 years with colours and 10 years reserve for certain large regiments tentatively examined

 

AO/204/05

 

1906 Sep to 1914

 

7 years with colours and 5 years reserve for all. Extensions to 7 years allowed

 

AO 209/06

 

War

 

3 years or the duration, and also as above

 

 

 

1918/19

 

Various expedients to keep Army of Rhine up to strength

 

 

 

1922

 

Long service = 12 years

 

 

 

1924

 

7 and 5, [or 3 and 9 Guards]

 

AO 446 Dec Aled Jones

 

1932

 

[Guards 7 and 5 or 4 and 8]

 

AO 142 August Aled Jones

 

1938

 

Long Service 12 years option 9 more for pension

 

1947

 

May Aled Jones

 

1947

 

“normal” is 12 years, or 5 and 7 [sic]

 

Army estimates Aled Jones

 

 

 

Note that Foot Guards for long periods used 3 and 9, as they had no reserve formations. These are not annotated above.

 

Thank both for your help I think I understand

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  • 4 years later...
Keith_history_buff

This thread is bookmarked, as I have made good use of the table. I have taken the time to go through some surviving service records as of late. All of these men served with the South Wales Borderers.

Since the Cardwell reforms of 1881, service was 7 years with the colours, and 5 with the reserve. 

Army Order 117 of 1902, in the May 1902 compendium, changed this to 3 and 9
7246 Carl Bowditch enlisted on Wednesday 26 March 1902, his original terms of service were 7 years with the colours, and 5 with the reserve.

7251 Harry Jones enlisted on Monday 07 April 1902, his original terms of service were 3 years with the colours, and 9 with the reserve.
 
Army Order 189 of 1904, in the November 1904 compendium, changed this to 9 and 3  
8580 James Wills enlisted on Tuesday 11 October 1904, his original terms of service were 3 years with the colours, and 9 with the reserve.
8584 Leonard Thomas Knott enlisted on Friday 21 October 1904, his original terms of service were 9 years with the colours, and 3 with the reserve.
 
Army Order 209 of 1906, in the September 1906 compendium, changed this to 7 and 5  
9349 William Purse enlisted on Saturday 10 August 1906, his original terms of service were 9 years with the colours, and 3 with the reserve.
9361 William Bateman Lewis enlisted on Tuesday 14 August 1906, his original terms of service were 7 years with the colours, and 5 with the reserve.
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ss002d6252

Just looking at some of those date, very useful.

It's interesting that there were also 8+4 and 2+10 actually implemented (and which would still be in effect by 1914). Don't see many in the wild though.

1905 Army Return for comparison.

image.png

 

 

Craig

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ss002d6252
3 hours ago, Muerrisch said:

Interesting. My notes on the 2 and 10 say:

 

2 years with colours and 10 years reserve for certain large regiments tentatively examined

AO/204/05

 

I did not know that any were implemented so two questions: was there an "implementation Order" after 204, and were the few soldiers with those terms indeed in "large regiments", which I take to be four regular battalions.

 

Hansard seems to have no record ........ Colonel Blimp usually had something to say ...................

Just checked. The Oct 1903 army return doesn't mention which AO implemented it but mentions the 2&10 was in respect of ASC drivers.

 

The 8&4 was introduced for the household cavalry.

 

Craig

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  • 3 weeks later...
Keith_history_buff

I believe that the following county infantry regiments would be "large regiments" but do not have a source to support this assertion

'third and fourth regular battalions were added to the Northumberland Fusiliers, Warwickshire Regiment, Royal Fusiliers, King's (Liverpool Regiment), Lancashire Fusiliers, Worcestershire Regiment, Middlesex Regiment and the Manchester Regiment'
 

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