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M1917 scabbard marking


msdt
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Another very recent acquisition, a Remington Model 1917 bayonet in a Type 1 Jewell 1917 scabbard. It looks like it's been in British service as the green leather of the scabbard has a black coating on the front and sides. The green can be seen at the back.

What is interesting is the marking on the bottom of the leather hanger tab: 375 / M / 172. Since I bought it I've seen another example on the web marked 375 / B / 103 (looks as if it is not coated black). Anybody any thoughts as to what this represents?

Cheers,

Tony

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Is this a possibility:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/94th_Infantry_Division_%28United_States%29

The 94th started as a provisional division in 1918. It was originally going to be formed as the 94th (Puerto-Rico) Division, based out of Puerto Rico and composed of Spanish-speaking troops. However, the US Army lacked enough Spanish-speaking instructors to train the necessary support and technical services units, so it was agreed to create it as a "paper" division like the 93rd. The infantry regiments were assigned numbers 373 through 376, which would have been associated with the National Army's 94th Division. Only the 373rd–375th Infantry Regiments were formed. With the close of World War I, the division was disbanded.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puerto_Ricans_in_World_War_I

On April 6, 1917, the United States Congress declared war on Germany. By May 3, the Regiment was transferred to the regular Army and recruited 1,969 men and the 295th, 296, 373rd, 374th and 375th regiments of Puerto Rico were created. The United States also applied their military segregation policies to the native Puerto Ricans. Puerto Ricans of African descent were assigned to all black units such as the 375th Regiment.[4] Puerto Ricans were to be sent to North Carolina to train for deployment overseas, however Senators from the southeastern states opposed and foiled these plans, citing that Puerto Ricans would be a problem to the laws and customs of the racist Jim Crow policies. Southern politicians were alarmed of the idea of having armed African-Americans in the south and believed that Puerto Ricans of mixed race, who did not understand their racial policies, would only add to their problems.[19] On May 17, the Porto Rico Regiment of Infantry was sent to guard the Panama Canal in defense of the Panama Canal Zone and other vital military installations while the other Puerto Rican regiments guarded Puerto Rico.

Cheers,

Tony

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Why not a strong possibility? If there is no other interpretation then take it as perfectly acceptable. It certainly sounds feasible!

Only difficulty I have is the suggestion it may have gone into GB service (I assume you are thinking WW2) because of it being painted black... I most certainly know very little about the ones that went to GB (although my dad had one!), but the ones I have seen do not have the leather bit in place. I know SS has (or had) a few of these so perhaps he will say more on this.

Julian

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Tony,

I did (shame, shame! :blush: ) a Google to see if there was anything else of US origin with markings like this, and came up with a M.1910 First Aid Pouch marked 303 / 6 / 74. The site gives no indication as to whether or not this was a unit marking, but the format is similar - and (google again!) there was a 303 regiment, albeit WW2. I think your best bet may be GBForum - I can post there for you if you like?

Julian

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Hi Trajan,

The British service is not a difficulty. My suggestion above re the 375th regiment would be WW1 markings, the bayonets and scabbards would then have come to Britain during WW2. I see from a bit of further research (ie Googling!) that US Infantry regiments had companies A/B/C/D, E/F/G/H, I/K/L/M, representing 3 battalions with 250 men per rifle comany. I'm getting more sure that this may be provide the answer.

Cheers,

Tony

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