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Remembered Today:

Uniform identification - WWI


steveadams261
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I realize that this isn't the most useful photo, but it is all I have of my grandfather James Nevin (or Nivin)

Here is what I know for context:

- he was born near Glasgow

- the photo was taken in Liverpool in 1917. He also lived in Liverpool post-war for a few years before moving to Canada.

- in the military, he did something with horses

Thanks for any clues you might come up with.

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Royal Artillery of some form, I'd say.

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If he he has a middle initial T possiblity is John T Nevin 85088 RFA

Also there is John Nevin 37690 RGA

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Definitely an artilleryman, looks to be wearing a trade badge on the upper right sleeve, possibly a wheel so he could be a Wheelwright, a more enhanced view of the badge may confirm this

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There is a MiC for a Saddler 1327 (675398) James Nevin RFA TF. The 2nd number was issued to the 1st Brigade RFA West Lancashire Division late 1916 early 1917, this brigade was later renamed CCLXXV (I West Lancs) Brigade, RFA.

should also add that there is a 159973 James B Nevin RFA in the MiCs and service papers, address given as Liverpool and aged 18yrs 180 days in September 1916

Edited by jay dubaya
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Thanks for all of the quick feedback. I don't think we can do much more with the photo, and there aren't any others at this point.

I don't believe that he ever used a middle initial. I'm pretty sure he's not James B Nevin from Liverpool - I came across that record in Ancestry but the other related info didn't line up.

Could you point me to a page that helps me decipher the aconyms? (MiC, RFA, RGA etc.?)

Steve

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MIC = medal index card. RFA = Royal Field Artillery. RGA = Royal Garrison Artillery. Odds on he is RFA as he is dressed for mounted duties in breeches and spurs - the RFA's 15 pounder guns were pulled by a horse team with mounted drivers, whilst the RGA's heavier guns were moved by tractor or very slowly by horses or mules without riders. I am fairly sure about that last bit, but whatever the case most RGA men (but not all) are seen in photos wearing the regular trousers issued to all men on dismounted duties.

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Also wearing spurs. May suggest he's a Driver.

I think the Saddler identified above is the most likely candidate.

Is a better scan of his arm badge possible?

Rgds

Tim D

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As far as I'm aware, but happy to be corrected.

I should also add that a Saddler was a trade which warranted the wearing of an arm badge of a horses 'bit'. Also there is a MiC for a Cpl 675444 Abraham E Nevin RFA TF, the service number being allocated to the same brigade

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Nice one. 1911 Census for Abraham here - born 1894. 22 Cambridge Street, Wavertree, Liverpool. No James mentioned I'm afraid.

http://search.ancestry.com.au/cgi-bin/sse.dll?gss=angs-g&new=1&rank=1&gsfn=abraham+&gsfn_x=1&gsln=nevin&gsln_x=1&cpxt=1&cp=11&MSAV=0&uidh=tg7&pcat=ROOT_CATEGORY&h=20650271&db=1911England&indiv=1&ml_rpos=1

Rgds

Tim D

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I think it's a Sadler trade badge. I'd be pretty comfortable your man is the one identified by JD.

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Minor point; saddler etc was an appointment, not a trade, so the badge is of the appointment.

But a minor point I constantly overlook, thanks for the correction (again) Grumpy

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"trade" ["vulgar trade!"] is a rather modern usage because we need a sensible collective adjective for the whole bag of badges for skill-at-arms, prize, appointment, instructor, qualification and goodness knows what else that soldiers could attain.

It is, of course, the collective used by most collectors! I don't like it, obviously, but then there are lots of things I don't like but cannot change.

When zooming in on an individual badge, the proper adjective reminds us where it should be worn, so is useful.

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Hi how about having a go at naming this one - I thought it was 15th hussars but now not sure.

A member of the Price family possibly Geoffrey Wilmot Price born 1894 service no. 16677 Thanks in anticipation of help

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Medal Index Card and Medal Rolls list only 15th Hussars.

Rgds

Tim D

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I've attached a better view of the shoulder badge. It is (to me) consistent with the Saddlers insignia that Dubaya posted - do you agree?

Steve

post-126376-0-28529300-1452884456_thumb.

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Final (?) question. The MiC card (portion attached) has a date of 29-9-15. Am I right that that would be the date of being posted to France (and not the date of enlistment?).

Thank you all for your help. I didn't expect to get so far with just one old picture.

Steve

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