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Remembered Today:

canadian penknife


scall38
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I would be really interested if anyone can give me any information about this knife. Thanks

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Edited by scall38
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If you Google "M&D Canada 1915" as the search term (without the Quotes) you'll get 77,000 hits. Could be a long night :lol:

Best Wishes

Keith

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I have my Uncle's, which is identical and he was Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, then Machine Gun Corps.

But other than that, "I know nothing" as Sgt Schult's would say.

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Hi All

Looks like a WW1 rigging knife with the marlin spike but issued to all Canadian Forces up to 1960. The broad arrow within the C is the Canadian Military acceptance mark. M & D is Militia and Defence

Pics on Google.

Regards Barry

Has it got" Thomas Turner & Co, Sheffield" on the base of the blade near the hinge?

Edited by The Inspector
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The only other mark on mine is a "C" with an arrow inside the C as per Mars Link.

I am checking all this now. Please find attached the arrow sign surrounded by a circle.

That is not a circle, but the mark as previously described by FG - the broad arrow within a C denoting Canadian Government property.

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Hi All

Looks like a WW1 rigging knife with the marlin spike but issued to all Canadian Forces up to 1960. The broad arrow within the C is the Canadian Military acceptance mark. M & D is Militia and Defence

Pics on Google.

Regards Barry

Has it got" Thomas Turner & Co, Sheffield" on the base of the blade near the hinge?

A friend of mine collects Canadian issue Jacknives. He has at least three examples of pressed steel handled models all made by Thomas Turner and dated '14, '15, and '16. M&D is Militia and Defense. I have at least 2 British Issue 9494/1917 knives and they are identical to their Canadian cousins manufactured this way.

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What is the same style Canadian clasp knife that doesn't have the manufacturers mark and date on the side scale ?

khaki

Well, to answer my own question I had a close look at the blade and it is marked (MS LTD XX) which is a subsidiary company 'Metal Stampings of the well known Case knife company, They set up a company in Canada (Nova Scotia?) in 1948 and were in production to 1949 manufacturing folding knives for the Canadian military. This knife could be classified as that of the Korean War. The reason I give this information here is that it is almost identical to the Great War issue Canadian knife and recognizing the difference may be of use to members. the blade is broader, the lanyard ring is steel, it is not manufacturer marked on the scale but on the ricasso/flat of the blade. A very nice collectors knife but not GW.

khaki

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As referenced in my previous post. here is the (top) Canadian MS knife made in the late 1940's and below a GW Canadian 1915 model, note the similarity in overall appearance, with the exception of the broad blade, steel lanyard loop. lack of markings etc.

khaki

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Originally the two knives were almost identical. The narrow blade on the lower example is due to repeated sharpening of the blade. Not uncommon. Many of these knives were either carried home by their owners after service of bought surplus and used as working knives in civilian life.

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I am sorry Reese, but I believe that you are mistaken in reference to the blades, the WW1 Canadian has the standard spear point blade of the Great War period and the later model has what's known as a 'sheepsfoot blade'. The blade on the the 1915 model has minimal sharpening and if you compare the exposed portion of the quillion (where the trade marks are) you can see that they are equal. If for example the cutting edge had been filed away it would have increased the open area of the quillion in proportion to the amount of metal removed. if the filing was done lets say on the forward 2/3rds of the cutting edge that would also be obvious. I compared the blades to many others and the sheepsfoot blade appears to be WW2 and later standard.

regards

khaki

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Oh bu99er Khaki, you caught me being sloppy and working from memory rather than going to look. I'm getting old enough to know better. Went and looked in the bin and you are absolutely right.

Here's a picture of a late model with a mostly untouched blade and a well sharpened WWI (1916) model.

Thanks for keeping me honest Khaki.

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