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Remembered Today:

Any one know what this is?


KIRKY
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Shown this recently with a selection of other medals, Anyone know what it is?

Tony

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Shown this recently with a selection of other medals, Anyone know what it is?

Tony

Any chance of a reverse photograph?

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If I recall correctly the reverse has Signum Laudis on it (also an unofficial name for the medal) , it was awarded post 1917 (Emperor Karl) for exceptional merit in war or peace. It came in different classes and sizes with or without swords etc.

khaki

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And, just for bayonet fans, When in uniform, Emperor Karl almost always wore a Mannlicher bayonet, not a sword! Have a look at the selection shown at: http://www.emperorcharles.org/images/JPG%20800/cd%202/09--Karl-the-Sudden,%20Emperor%20of%20the%20People/

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Will get a reverse photo later, thanks for input so far,

Tony

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I have a couple of these in my own collection:-

The original Military Merit Medal, commonly known as the “Signum Laudis”, was introduced by Kaiser Franz Joseph on the 12th of March 1890 as a sign of His Majesty’s praise and recognition for outstanding achievements in war and as a sign of his satisfaction for excellent service in peace. The award was for commissioned officers and officials of similar rank and was in bronze. The obverse bore the picture of the Kaiser and the reverse the motto SIGNUM LAUDIS within a laurel wreath. The award for wartime achievement was worn on the ribbon of the Bravery Medal and that for service in peace on a red ribbon 3.75cm in width. Both were worn on the left breast.

On the March 26, 1911 a further award was sanctioned - a medal in silver for repeated actions worthy of royal praise.

A Royal decree of April 1, 1916 introduced bars for second and third awards of the Silver Merit Medal and further introduced a new grade altogether. This was the Große Militärverdientsmedaille which as its name suggests was somewhat larger and additionally had a laurel wreath around the Crown. The whole medal was in a gold finish. The Große was said to be an expression of His Majesty’s especial praise and recognition (besondere allerhöchste belobende Anerkennung) and was awarded to only thirty individuals including Kaiser Karl.

On the 13th of December 1916 the addition of Crossed Swords in gold were permitted for the Bronze, Silver and Große Military Merit Medals. In the case of medals without bars these were worn directly on the ribbon. If a recipient had a bar to his award, the Swords were affixed to the bar.

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Kitcheners Bugle : thanks for that , was it awarded to British Soldiers ever?

Tony

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I had a good look on line for awards to foreigners and there were about ten in the higher medal grades and I think that most of these went to German Generals and a couple to Turkish Generals. Considering the medals date of inception 1890 I can't imagine any reason or likelihood where the early issues would have been awarded to British personages, after 1914 they were considered enemy medals.

A nice looking medal to have.

khaki

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And, just for bayonet fans, When in uniform, Emperor Karl almost always wore a Mannlicher bayonet, not a sword! Have a look at the selection shown at: http://www.emperorcharles.org/images/JPG%20800/cd%202/09--Karl-the-Sudden,%20Emperor%20of%20the%20People/

Those are great photo's, I wonder what the motivation was for Emperor Karl?, I had a look for Emperor Franz Josef wearing a bayonet but found none. I actually think that wearing the bayonet in lieu of a sword looked better and was more practical nearer the front line. When I think about it didn't Crown Prince Wilhelm wear a dagger or a bayonet?,

khaki

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I had a good look on line for awards to foreigners and there were about ten in the higher medal grades and I think that most of these went to German Generals and a couple to Turkish Generals. Considering the medals date of inception 1890 I can't imagine any reason or likelihood where the early issues would have been awarded to British personages, after 1914 they were considered enemy medals.

A nice looking medal to have.

khaki

I do not think that any British subjects have received this award - as Khaki says the Austro-Hungarian Empire was part of the Axis and the medal became obsolete in 1918 with the collapse of the Empire.

British subjects would have been given other awards to recognize good service in diplomatic capacities prior to the war but these are very rare.

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Thanks all for your input.

Tony

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