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Remembered Today:

long barrell luger


scall38
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I would be really interested in any thing members can give me relating to this pistol . I hope the markings are visible thanks

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Edited by scall38
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The crowned 'Gothic' letters on the obverse are the so-called 'fraktur' marks, the 'Abnahmenstempel' of the inspectors, and of course you have a serial number on the reverse. But there should be a maker's stamp and year somewhere, and also possibly a unit marking. There is quite a lot of specialist literature on these and the short-barrelled ones - mainly in the US of A.

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Commonly known as the 'artillery' model, looks like a nice example, magazine is missing.

Mike.

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There is an endless amount of information on P08 's (Lugers) indeed to start talking about Lugers in detail would be a need to develop its own thread.

In simple terms for the great war there was the standard model with a short barrel and the Artillery 8" & the Naval, can't remember the barrel length. The best idea is to get a technical book on Luger's with plenty of illustrations. here in the USA, its all about condition with Lugers, with some of them bringing many thousands of dollars. I am not in that league I prefer the battle used.

here's my artillery,

khaki

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re. #4 this shows the makers mark for DWM - Duetsche Waffen-und Munitionsfabriken in Karlshuhe. The date of manufacture should be stamped on the receiver.

Mike.

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The lever in front of the trigger guard on the left is for take-down. It's lost the knurled knob on its end. You hold back the toggle (still closed), typically with the right hand, then swing down the lever - you can then remove the side-plate with its bellcrank connecting the trigger to the spring button on the end of the sear. Turn the gun over and slide the bifurcated receiver off forward - the mainspring connector t-piece should drop out of its location in the rear toggle link. Then you can push out the rear toggle pivot pin and dismantle the subassembly.

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The lever in front of the trigger guard on the left is for take-down. It's lost the knurled knob on its end. You hold back the toggle (still closed), typically with the right hand, then swing down the lever - you can then remove the side-plate with its bellcrank connecting the trigger to the spring button on the end of the sear. Turn the gun over and slide the bifurcated receiver off forward - the mainspring connector t-piece should drop out of its location in the rear toggle link. Then you can push out the rear toggle pivot pin and dismantle the subassembly.

also looks like a replacement part, number should be 63, I see 28/29? all parts should be stamped with serial number 9963 or the last two numbers thereof, 63, date of manufacture should be on breech end of barrel

regards

Bob R.

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I assume it has been deactivated???? :whistle:

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also looks like a replacement part, number should be 63, I see 28/29? all parts should be stamped with serial number 9963 or the last two numbers thereof, 63, date of manufacture should be on breech end of barrel

regards

Bob R.

So I see - I didn't notice that. :D

I should also say I think (IIRC) you need to retract the safety (so that 'gesichert' is no longer exposed) to allow the toggle to pass forward when stripping.

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