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The Ibis

First World War Lectures/Presentations/Discussions on YouTube

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Perth Digger

Thanks for the Sheffield lecture.

 

Mike

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The Ibis

This is really good one...The Fighter Pilot with a Thousand Faces: The Birth of the Knights of the Air presented by Michael Hankins.

 

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Streamed live on Nov 2, 2018

The airplane began the First World War as primarily a reconnaissance tool, but through the years of bitter fighting, it evolved quickly. By 1918, aircraft in many shapes and sizes performed a variety of roles including bombing, ground support, interdiction and air-to-air combat. Intertwined with this evolution in technology was a similar evolution in culture. Pilots that focused on “pursuit” (air-to-air combat), began developing their own subculture. Partly as a response to the bleak conditions of trench warfare on the ground, pursuit pilots valued their independence and aggressiveness, and tended to see themselves as heroes in the mold of Greek myths or medieval knights. This culture was a constructed abstraction of reality. For some it was a veneer to cover the fears associated with flying, or the pain of losing comrades, and in some cases it was an accurate reflection of individual personalities. For all involved, this culture—itself a romanticization of reality—was a call back to a romanticized past. Yet it was powerful force that both brought pursuit pilots together and separated them from other types of fliers and soldiers. The main tenets of the subculture of the “knights of the air” that was formed in the First World War have been passed down through the decades and remain the key elements of fighter pilot culture 100 years later.

Dr. Michael Hankins, Assistant Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Air Force's eSchool of Graduate PME, the distance learning component of the Air Command and Staff College

Lecture given as part of the National WWI Museum and Memorial's 2018 Symposium, 1918: Crucible of War.

 

 

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The Ibis

Writing the global history of a forgotten army: The Allied armies of the Orient in WWI Greece by Anastassios Anastassiadis

 

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Published on Jan 31, 2019

Lecture by Anastassios Anastassiadis (Associate Professor of History & Phrixos B. Papachristidis chair in Modern Greek Studies, History & Classical Studies Department, McGill University) - 16 January 2019

“Writing the global history of a forgotten army: The Allied armies of the Orient in WWI Greece”

More than 600,000 Entente soldiers from around the world were at one point camped in WWI Greece. Between 1916 and 1918, there were 250,000 of them stationed in and around Thessaloniki, a city of 170,000 inhabitants at the time.

However, the story of these Allied Armies has mostly been cast to oblivion, despite not only their role in terms of the outcome of the war but also their huge impact in terms of the biopolitics, meaning their contacts with the civilian population in a variety of forms: infrastructure, transportation, housing and food logistics, medical care and hygiene and even governance.

Based on a current multi-partner research project, this talk will address some of those points and also touch upon the reasons this presence disappeared from the collective memory, both in Greece and in certain Allied countries like France.

 

 

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The Ibis

The Great War: Its End and Effects, Lecture by Professor Annika Mombauer

 

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Published on Feb 15, 2019

12 February 2019, “Changing German Views of the Great War”, Annika Mombauer, Professor of Modern European History, Open University. The lecture was sponsored by Christ Church Cathedral and the McDonald Centre for Theology, Ethics, and Public Life, Oxford.

 

 

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The Ibis

The Armenian Legionnaires: Sacrifice and Betrayal in World War I by Susan Pattie.

 

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Published on Mar 29, 2019

Susan Paul Pattie, Honorary Senior Research Associate at the University College London
Recorded on March 20, 2019.

 

Following the devastation resulting from the 1915 Armenian Genocide in the Ottoman Empire, the survivors of the massacres were dispersed across the Middle East, Europe and North and South America. Not content with watching World War I silently from the sidelines, a large number of Armenian volunteers joined the Légion d'Orient. They were trained in Cyprus and fought courageously in Palestine alongside Allied commander General Allenby, eventually playing a crucial role in defeating the German and Ottoman forces in Palestine at the Battle of Arara in September 1918. The Armenian legionnaires signed up on the understanding that they would be fighting in Syria and Turkey, and, should the Allies be successful, they would be part of an occupying army in their old homelands, laying the foundation for a self-governing Armenian state.

Susan Pattie describes the motivations and dreams of the Armenian Legionnaires and their ultimate betrayal as the French and the British shifted their priorities, leaving their ancestral homelands to the emerging Republic of Turkey. Complete with eyewitness accounts, letters and photographs, this book provides an insight into relations between the Great Powers through the lens of a small, vulnerable people caught in a war that was not their own, but which had already destroyed their known world.

Copies of "The Armenian Legionnaires" will be available for purchase (cash only) at the event.

Susan Pattie, former Director of the Armenian Institute in London is currently leader of the Pilot Project of the Armenian Diaspora Survey, funded by the Gulbenkian Foundation. She holds a PhD in Anthropology from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

 

 

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The Ibis

The WFA just posted a 2016 lecture by Gary Sheffied entitled "The Battle of the Somme reassessed" that might be of interest.

 

 

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Fattyowls

Great finds, thank you.

 

Pete.

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WhiteStarLine
2 hours ago, The Ibis said:

The WFA just posted a 2016 lecture by Gary Sheffied entitled "The Battle of the Somme reassessed" that might be of interest.

Just watched this in its entirety.  Very worthwhile and thanks for posting.

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The Ibis

You're most welcome, Fattyowls and WhiteStarLine.

 

Here is a lecture on Paul von Lettow-Vorbeck. It is part of the Ft. Leavenworth series at the Dole Institute. Mark Hull is the presenter. I haven't watched this one.

 

 

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David Tattersfield

The WFA youtube channel (link here  YouTube ) has just had uploaded to it a number of new videos. 

 

We have  'The World of the RAMC in WW1' by Jessica Myers 

 

 

Then FIVE videos from a conference held in Dundee all of which have a Scottish theme, being 

 

1) Scotland in British Propaganda 1914-1918 by Prof Stephen Badsey 

2) The Canadian Corps 1914-1917 by Rob Thompson

3) Vera Brittain: Nursing on the Western Front by Dr Phylomena Badsey

4) Reflections on Scotland and the New Armies 1914-1918 by Prof Peter Simkins

5) Douglas Haig: Hero of Scotland, Britain and the Empire by Prof Gary Sheffield

 

The links for these are below:

 

1) 

 

 

2) 

 

 

3) 

 

 

4) 

 

 

5)  

 

 

I would warmly encourage GWF members to subscribe to the WFA youtube channel 

 

Regards

 

David

 

 

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David Tattersfield

And, hot off the press, to mark the retirement of Prof Peter Simkins as the WFA's president (he is now the WFA's co-Patron) the WFA has published, on its youtube channel, Peter's presentation to the Yorkshire branch about the 12th (Eastern) Division in the Hundred Days. I hope GWF members find this of interest. 

 

 

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