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Remembered Today:

Those beastly germans


johnboy
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It must have been a quiet day! I wonder if the writer was asked to explain why nobody took a shot at him?!

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Brilliant! Which diary is this from?

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At least he tried to bring some bottles with him.

It sounds like the sort of thing a man would do when the pressure made him crack.

Craig

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Craig, my dear fellow. It simply sounds like a Saturday night in Newcastle.

"Come on. I'll teck yers all on"

"Nein, Otto. They're not worth it man"

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You're quite right, those from across the river are a bit like that.

I can say that safely knowing that I'm from south of the Tyne but from up in the hills at Consett. We would never do anything like that up there...

Craig

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Brilliant! Which diary is this from?

I just came across it and found it amusing, but not enough to make a note of the diary!

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Craig, my dear fellow. It simply sounds like a Saturday night in Newcastle.

"Come on. I'll teck yers all on"

"Nein, Otto. They're not worth it man"

Don't be silly. The chap's top half was clothed.

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Bearded, bespectacled, AND wearing a dark blue tunic? Must be one of them part-time soldiers in the reserves... Probably a plashy-footed Friesan to boot (if he had any)... No sense of order and dignity... Now in my time (blah, blah, blah)....

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Bearded, bespectacled,

... and weighing 20 stone? Re-enactor.

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Craig, my dear fellow. It simply sounds like a Saturday night in Newcastle.

"Come on. I'll teck yers all on"

"Nein, Otto. They're not worth it man"

:lol:

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... and weighing 20 stone? Re-enactor.

Steven, your very bad! :lol:

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Bearded, bespectacled, AND wearing a dark blue tunic? Must be one of them part-time soldiers in the reserves... Probably a plashy-footed Friesan to boot (if he had any)... No sense of order and dignity... Now in my time (blah, blah, blah)....

English propaganda! Frisians only drink tea.....or so

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On a similar note, the last sentence in this excerpt from a report by Brig.-Gen. Kentish about the events of 10th April 1918 makes for amusing reading. I would dearly loved to have witnessed this.

166%20bde%2010%20april%2018_zps68s4uvms.

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On a similar note, the last sentence in this excerpt from a report by Brig.-Gen. Kentish about the events of 10th April 1918 makes for amusing reading. I would dearly loved to have witnessed this.

166%20bde%2010%20april%2018_zps68s4uvms.

Oh my God! :lol:

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The drunk German gets himself around.

You can be taught how to deal with shells but I'm pretty sure drunk Germans weren't in the syllabus.

Craig

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Would a Brig=Gen have been left in such a position?

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Would a Brig=Gen have been left in such a position?

Things were a little hit and miss at the time- he was shelled out of this farm house and his next Brigade HQ was behind a haystack 200 yards further back. When he was shelled out of that position he moved to a nearby culvert. Every available man was trying to construct the G Switch Line to plug the huge hole left after the Portuguese had retired so promptly, this line being manned by a conglomeration of various infantry units, Transport & Stores personnel, every spare bod from various HQs and a couple of RE Field Companies (who performed superbly in the infantry role!). I estimate that there were no more than 150 men holding the immediate portion of line between Brigade HQ and the German attacking force and their artillery support consisted of one 18-pounder. When support from Howitzers was eventually garnered later that evening, they actually dropped their rounds onto his HQ and the British front line. I wouldn't actually be surprised if Kentish was armed with a rifle and bayonet- he was very much in the same mold as Stockwell (Jeudwine had his work cut out with these two!) and had been a company-commander with the Royal Irish Fusiliers at Le Cateau. In June of that year he actually gave the entire Brigade a demonstration of bayonet fighting, which apparently was quite impressive.

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Thanks for the explanation. Still begs the question of how a drunk German soldier managed to get so far behind the line without attracting attention!

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Thanks for the explanation. Still begs the question of how a drunk German soldier managed to get so far behind the line without attracting attention!

Maybe he found the brigadier generals stash

Craig

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Thanks for the explanation. Still begs the question of how a drunk German soldier managed to get so far behind the line without attracting attention!

Visibility was down to 25 yards when the Germans attacked on 9 April. The 1/5th were called forward from La Tombe Willot and ordered to deploy along the Emperor Road, on a line near Rue de Touret (see Company positions below). A Company (all 85 of them) were to link on their left with a Cyclist Battalion deploying southwards from La Couture, but there was a gap of 1,000 yards between them and the Cyclists and no-one left to plug it. Somewhere around Midday, A Company were encircled from their left and overrun from behind, (local visibility was still less than 50 yards) only three men managing to fight their way out. B Company were attacked next, but managed to hold, though they were forced back 100 yards. I suspect that the drunken German was either one of the original attackers who'd displaced the Portuguese division, or from one of the force that penetrated to the left of A Company. Although the fog lifted there later in the afternoon of 9 April, visibility was almost as bad on 10 April, though it didn't hang around as long that day. These positions were some 2.5 miles behind the front line of 8 April as held by the Portuguese Division, so you're not looking at a line of prepared defences.

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Bavarians! A prisoner gave the following information in a statement from April 13th 1918...

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English propaganda! Frisians only drink tea.....or so

With milk in, presumably.

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