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MickLeeds

Trinity College Dublin's Great War Revisited exhibition.

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MickLeeds

"Featuring rare and previously unpublished material, Trinity College Dublin's Great War Revisited exhibition is now online at the Google Cultural Institute.

It includes 60 exhibits from TCD Library's rich collection including Irish WW1 recruiting posters, photos of the Allied campaign in Iraq and Turkey, letters and diaries from soldiers serving in France, Iraq and Palastine, and political pamphlets, artworks, songs and ballads."

http://www.irishgenealogynews.com/

Trinity College Dublin's Great War Revisited exhibition.

https://www.google.com/culturalinstitute/collection/trinity-college-dublin-library

Mick.

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jdoyle

thanks for this.

Some interesting snippets there.

Johnny

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mick1234

Thanks for sharing Mick,

Some nice stuff there.

Mick

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Anneca

Many thanks Mick, I thoroughly enjoyed looking at this.

Anne

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charlie962

Part of the above and I don't know if anyone has posted this already but there are some 96 excellent photos of staff and students of TCD medical school who fell 1914-19 here

Charlie962

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Michael Pegum

Part of the above and I don't know if anyone has posted this already but there are some 96 excellent photos of staff and students of TCD medical school who fell 1914-19 here

Charlie962

If anyone looks very closely indeed at these photographs, they will see that Captain George Seymour Russell Stritch, who is listed (correctly) as having been killed in action serving with the 6th Connaught Rangers, is wearing the badges of the Durham Light Infantry. He lived in Durham, and was in a Territorial Battalion of the D.L.I. before the war, but was living in Dublin and enlisted with the Connaught Rangers when the war broke out. He had been a medical student in Trinity College, Dublin, and qualified as a doctor elsewhere, but was an infantry officer during the war.

He was my grandfather.

Michael

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charlie962

Michael, I had noticed a number of medical men take the decision to join a fighting arm, even that most destructive, the Artillery. There is at least one TCD man in the RFA. Did you ever learn any explanation in your family? Forgive me if it is a delicate subject.

Charlie962

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Michael Pegum

Unfortunately, I don't know why he was in the infantry. He had managed to qualify after studying in both Dublin and Edinburgh, and was a G.P. in Dublin when the war began. His obituary in the Lancet said that he had applied for a commission in the R.A.M.C., but, "not being immediately successful, he accepted a captaincy in his old regiment, the Durham Light Infantry, and was afterwards transferred to the regiment in which he lost his life." It would be interesting to know if the R.A.M.C. had more entrants than they thought they needed at the beginning of the war.

My mother, who barely remembered him, was told that he was due to be transferred to the R.A.M.C. at the time of his death, and she, rather naively, thought that he would have been safe if he had been.

By the time I thought to enquire, all his contemporaries in the family had died. His records at Kew are no help.

Michael.

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