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Dublin3

Irish Munitions workers - did your Granny make Bombs in WW I

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Dublin3

Hi,

Recently I’ve given a number of talks under the title “Did your Granny make Bombs in World War 1” about Dublin’s National Shell Factory and the private Dublin Dockyard Factory as well as overviews of the Irish munitions industry in genera,l during the First World War. Surprisingly many of those who came along had ancestors who worked at munitions making in Britain, largely during WW II, however there were a number who had family who worked at the Dockyard Factory and one who had a grandfather who worked at a factory in Scotland in WW I. I’m currently working on a piece on Irish Trade Unions and the Munitions Industry in Ireland. However while there is a lot more evidence available than most people realise, the one thing missing is the stories of the individuals who actually participated. What type of economic impact did the high wages available to both men and women actually have? What were the experiences of those who moved to British factories (nearly 17,000)? How many decided to stay or did they return home enriched enough to kick-start a new life? I know this is a long shot but I’d really like to hear from anyone who had a Granny or Grandfather who made bombs during the war as this is an ongoing project with a view to publishing the results.

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jdoyle

no family involvement in the munitions factory but I do have a passing interest (boards.ie).

Joe Good fought in the Easter Rising with the Volunteers and was later employed at the Parkgate site which seemed a bit odd.

Would be interested to see the output from your research. Great idea for a project!

Johnny

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ShazArch

Hi dublin3,


It would be worthwhile getting in touch with Carlow Military Museum. I was given a tour by a man there (sorry can't remember his name) and he showed me a photograph that is on display there that belonged to his granny. It was of a group of women in a munitions factory in UK (I think), one being his grandmother but apparently there were many women from Carlow and Castledermot in it. It's a great little museum, though only open Sunday afternoons as run by volunteers. Hope that helps!


S


PS would you travel to Kildare to give that talk??


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Dublin3

Member2 thanks for the tip on Carlow Military Museum. There was munitions making at Carlow up to some time in 1916, probably at Thompsons Hanover Works. The Thompsons had a contract for 18 pounder shells which they made at the Neptune Works at Waterford. There may be a link between the women who went to England and those who may have worked for Thompsons. I'll definitely check it out.

Johnny, Joe Good did indeed work at Parkgate Street with the Furlong brothers who had worked there with Joe Vize before the Rising. They quit the week before, curiously enough, as Chalk, the DMP undercover agent, reported that three Citizen army men were working at the National Shell Factory (they were in fact all Kimmage Garrison). The Furlong's second stint coincided with their working at an IRA factory at Parnell Street.

I'm giving a talk on the 25th July for the Smithfield Peoples Project at the Cobblestone, Dublin, outlining the operation of the Ministry of Munitions in Ireland and taking a look at private shell producing companies such as the Neptune (Waterford), Lee Arrow (Cork), George Watts(Dublin), E.A. Watson's Fuse Factory at the Inchicore Works, and the Dublin Dockyard Factory. Another speaker will be outlining the history of the three factories at Parkgate Street with an emphasis on the role of the women workers.

I'd love to do a talk in Kildare but I'm tied up for the next few months but maybe later on?

Regards,

Hugo

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jdoyle

Johnny, Joe Good did indeed work at Parkgate Street with the Furlong brothers who had worked there with Joe Vize before the Rising. They quit the week before, curiously enough, as Chalk, the DMP undercover agent, reported that three Citizen army men were working at the National Shell Factory (they were in fact all Kimmage Garrison). The Furlong's second stint coincided with their working at an IRA factory at Parnell Street.

I'm giving a talk on the 25th July for the Smithfield Peoples Project at the Cobblestone, Dublin, outlining the operation of the Ministry of Munitions in Ireland and taking a look at private shell producing companies such as the Neptune (Waterford), Lee Arrow (Cork), George Watts(Dublin), E.A. Watson's Fuse Factory at the Inchicore Works, and the Dublin Dockyard Factory. Another speaker will be outlining the history of the three factories at Parkgate Street with an emphasis on the role of the women workers.

Regards,

Hugo

Hugo,

would like to get to your talk but I won't be home again till October.

I put some stats on line re production figures if of interest

http://johnny-doyle.blogspot.co.uk/2013/11/munitions-factories-in-ireland-during.html

Aware of the Furlong brothers and 198 Parnell St but haven't delved into this so far. I went through the online copies of An t-Oglach looking at Easter Rising related material

http://johnny-doyle.blogspot.co.uk/2014/03/an-t-oglach-easter-rising-series-of.html

and there's a short piece on munitions making in this edition with some nice photos

http://antoglach.militaryarchives.ie/PDF/1923_06_02_No_08_Vol_1_An_t-Oglac-8.pdf

Johnny

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lizbet

Hi,

I know this is a long shot but I’d really like to hear from anyone who had a Granny or Grandfather who made bombs during the war as this is an ongoing project with a view to publishing the results.

Don't know her actual job but my Granny was at Hayes c 1916-1918 , was already involved with the Fabian party and went on to become a Union organiser. Don't know much more but trying to research it and would like to be in touch. Have you had any response from anyone with a relative at one of the Canadian "filling factories"?

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tanks3

Dublin3

Pity you are not UK based as I would love you to come and speak to our group here in Lincolnshire

Tanks3

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