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McCrystalHarrison

Wearing of ww1 medals

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WilliamRev

I have a friend who wears his grandfather's War Medal (another member of the family seemingly had the Victory medal, and it has been lost), on the right, to the Remembrance Day service at the local war memorial, and as far as I know he has had nothing but kind and interested comments.

William

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Stoppage Drill

Here's another moral conundrum then - my father would never wear his WW2 medals after he became a civilian even though he had many opportunities to do so over the years left to him. Without going into detail he was one of that war's emotional casualties.

When appropriate circumstances arise, should I, or my own children and grandchildren, honour him by wearing them (right side) - or not ?

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KGB

Here's another moral conundrum then - my father would never wear his WW2 medals after he became a civilian even though he had many opportunities to do so over the years left to him. Without going into detail he was one of that war's emotional casualties.

When appropriate circumstances arise, should I, or my own children and grandchildren, honour him by wearing them (right side) - or not ?

Objectively I would opt to wear the medals. You would not be free to if the allies had lost;(

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Khaki

Honoring family members comes in many forms, from carrying a framed photograph at memorial services to wearing his/her medals, would I wear family medals?, no, I wouldn't they were my dads/uncles etc. However I see nothing wrong in doing so if that gives some comfort, I recall seeing other kids wearing their fathers medals at a veterans parade and my father explaining to me that they were war orphans, I remember feeling empathy for them at the time, I hope it helped them cope with their loss.

khaki

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Medaler

Here's another moral conundrum then - my father would never wear his WW2 medals after he became a civilian even though he had many opportunities to do so over the years left to him. Without going into detail he was one of that war's emotional casualties.

When appropriate circumstances arise, should I, or my own children and grandchildren, honour him by wearing them (right side) - or not ?

I don't see it as a moral conundrum at all. You would be honouring your father as you personally see fit. There is no doubt of his entitlement to wear them, just that he chose not to do so. There is no disrespect being shown in any way by your wearing them. It is your personal tribute to the life and service of you father - who would dare to take issue with that?

The key to it is understanding that you would be wearing them for completely different reasons to those that he had for not wearing them himself.

Warmest regards,

Mike

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Kitchener's Bugle

Here's another moral conundrum then - my father would never wear his WW2 medals after he became a civilian even though he had many opportunities to do so over the years left to him. Without going into detail he was one of that war's emotional casualties.

When appropriate circumstances arise, should I, or my own children and grandchildren, honour him by wearing them (right side) - or not ?

It all comes down to personal choice as as been mentioned several times....... my view (for what its worth!) is that your father earned his medals and as his son you have the right and should feel nothing but pride and respect in waring them. Clearly your father brought back with him much more than positive memories like so many others.

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james_harvey

They are fine to wear as all miniatures are unofficial. Wear them with pride.

Our own British legion advise only wearing 1 set of family medals.

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Andy Wade

Tell your grandson to wear them with pride on the right side. It's nobody else's business what you do.

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Guest ExEagle

I wore my grandfathers medals (on the right side) to the Gallipoli remembrance service in Whitehall.

His DCM sitting proud. This was awarded for actions at Gallipoli.

So if you have any medals first or second war, awarded to a family member show them with pride.

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Derek Black

Wear them on your right hand side, or do not wear them at all, it's entirely personal choice, nothing to be dictated by anyone else.

I choose not to wear my two grandfathers war medals. They are in a glass frame on the wall.

WW2 medals had to be claimed for years after the war ended. Many veterans never bothered and every week applications are made by them, or surving family on their behalf, for them.

I assisted a relation in Australia claim his fathers medals just 3 years ago.

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Khaki

I haven't reread all the posts, but I just had a 'horror' thought and so offer this advice/warning to those who choose to wear their family medals, remember that those ribbons are probably approaching their 90 plus years and may not be capable of carrying the weight of the medal and the movement. Don't go to the parade wearing a trio and go home with a pair because one of the ribbons or stitching was rotted and gave way.

khaki

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Andy Wade

Damned good advice Khaki. :thumbsup:
Wearing replicas is also a good idea. We had this happen locally last year and now his medals are gone for good:

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Khaki

Another thought is that if you are determined to wear something in a family members honor, (providing that it is allowable by law in your country) what about leaving the medals at home and wear a ribbon bar on the right side ?

khaki

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KGB

Another thought is that if you are determined to wear something in a family members honor, (providing that it is allowable by law in your country) what about leaving the medals at home and wear a ribbon bar on the right side ?

khaki

Not a legal matter. It is impossible for me to pass for a Gallipoli veteran so I can (legally) wear my Grandfather's medals. More a matter of "taste", as Armistice Day falls once a year I think we may be allowed a "lapse" if that is what some opine.

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Beechhill

Here's another moral conundrum then - my father would never wear his WW2 medals after he became a civilian even though he had many opportunities to do so over the years left to him. Without going into detail he was one of that war's emotional casualties.

When appropriate circumstances arise, should I, or my own children and grandchildren, honour him by wearing them (right side) - or not ?

I'd say the more so. In his honour, and indeed because he himself didn't have the heart to.

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Stoppage Drill

It was a legal matter in UK until quite recently, vide s.197 of the 1955 Army Act. However, that Act was repealed when the 2006 Army Act came into full force from 1 November 2009, and there is no provision in the new act to create an offence of wearing medals to which one has no entitlement.

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Derek Black

The question of wearing a family members medals was in the press within months of the end of the war.

(The Scotsman 5th May 1919)

"The War Office states a mistaken impression is prevalent that the parents or other relatives of a deceased officer or soldier are entitled to wear on their right breast the decorations and medals, or the ribbons appertaining thereto, that may have been awarded to him for service in the field.

Decorations and medals may only be worn by the individual upon whom they are conferred, and in no case does the right to wear a decoration or medal or their ribbon devolve upon the parents or other relatives after the recipient is dead.

Similarly, in cases where a posthumous award is made, and the actual decoration or medal is handed to the deceased's next-of-kin, such decoration or medal may not be worn."

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KGB

It was a legal matter in UK until quite recently, vide s.197 of the 1955 Army Act. However, that Act was repealed when the 2006 Army Act came into full force from 1 November 2009, and there is no provision in the new act to create an offence of wearing medals to which one has no entitlement.

Good point, I do recall a chap a few years ago wearing just about everything issued since 1945 (oh and a SAS badge) he was on the front page of many tabloids.

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Andy Wade

Just the one? There's loads of them. None of whom appear to have read 'Walting with confidence'...

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KGB

Just the one? There's loads of them. None of whom appear to have read 'Walting with confidence'...

I have the "Medaille de Verdun" which from what I can ascertain is a family award.

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Khaki

Just musing, but a little bit of a conundrum if a Granddad was entitled to a neck order and maybe a breast star to go with it etc,

khaki :w00t:

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MartH

Just musing, but a little bit of a conundrum if a Granddad was entitled to a neck order and maybe a breast star to go with it etc,

khaki :w00t:

Like my grandfather, though his awards do include an Iron Cross, as well as all his Finnish medals.

I always thought the original idea/permission for other people to wear the medals was for parents, widows and children, but it has morphed into other descendants, but I don't think they thought about grandchildren at the time.

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Andy Wade

A friend of mine has his grandfather's two medals from WW1 in a case (it's a bit like a larger spectacles case) and he takes them along to the Remembrance Day event, but keeps the case in his pocket. Last year for the centenary commemorations he actually wore them but it was a one-off and I'm sure they'll be back in the case and in his pocket next year.

I think it's perfectly OK to wear them if you like, just not as if they were your own medals, so they should be on the right side as that seems to be the custom.

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