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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Request for help to identify a mystery man and his uniform


Fivejays
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Hi there - I'm hoping the experts in the forum can help us to solve a mystery?

The image below is a scan of a picture that we found when clearing an elderly relative's house after her death. Had we found it before she died, we might know who the man in the picture is!

Anyway, we're hoping that someone can identify the uniform from the cap and collar badges shown in the image, because all of our research on Google has not come up with any definite answers. Once we know the origin of the uniform, it might help us to identify if this is a long lost ancestor or just a random stranger.

Thanks in anticipation of your help.

scan0007_zpsb321eff7.jpg

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Welcome to the Forum Fivejays

He appears to be an Officer in the Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment)

Sepoy

NB If you can post the complete photograph, we may be able to give you his rank.

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Yes, the Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment).

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He would appear to be an officer, perhaps of the Notts and Derbys?

Blimey tooo sloowwwwwww. :huh:

Edited by 4thGordons
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Wasn't expecting such a quick response - thanks chaps! I looked at the Notts & Derby cap badge during our searches and wasn't 100% sure. However, when three people come back with the same conclusion, I think it's safe to assume you're right.

Any ideas what the collar badge represents as this appears to be slightly different?

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Welcome to the Forum Fivejays

He appears to be an Officer in the Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment)

Sepoy

NB If you can post the complete photograph, we may be able to give you his rank.

Thanks for the welcome - I'll try to scan the whole picture.

Stand by!

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Hello 5Js

He's a Second Lieutenant in the above-mentioned regiment. That's as much information as can be got from the photo.

Regards,

W.

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The only other comment I would make is that he is wearing a Second Lieutenant's Cuff Ranks. These were worn at the outset of the Great War but they made Officers stand out as targets. Officers in the trenches began to simply wear the "pips" on their shoulder straps, but it was really frowned upon in Home Stations until 1917 when it was generally accepted.

Sepoy

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Any ideas what the collar badge represents as this appears to be slightly different?

His collar badges are basically the same, but at a slightly different angle in the photograph.

At the time, Officers mainly wore bronze cap badges and collar badges which were of similar design and size. Officer Service Dress bronze cap badges had blade fittings which were simply folded over when permamently mounted on their caps. Collar badges had loop/split pin fittings so they could be easily removed when the uniform was cleaned.

Sepoy

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Couple of things to look for, Is the photo mounted? if so (and if possible) remove the mount and look in the bottom corners for photographer details (you will sometimes get the name of the town where they were based) look on the back of the photo, for any pencil markings. I have found scanning the back of a photo and reversing the image (IE turn into a negative) often shows up faint markings that can then be read

Edited by Glen
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The only other comment I would make is that he is wearing a Second Lieutenant's Cuff Ranks. These were worn at the outset of the Great War but they made Officers stand out as targets. Officers in the trenches began to simply wear the "pips" on their shoulder straps, but it was really frowned upon in Home Stations until 1917 when it was generally accepted.

Sepoy

That's only partly true. Shoulder rank was adopted by some for the reason stated above, but there is plenty of photographic evidence showing that the wearing of cuff rank remained common practice right to the end of the war, both at home and in the front line.

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In some units it was not uncommon for both types of rank insignia to be worn, within the same battalion, even as late as 1918. Something that would have been unacceptable in peacetime.

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