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Remembered Today:

Romanian Army during the Great War?


macclesfieldman
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Hi all,

I have found an image that must stem from my grand-grand father who lived in Romania at that time. However, I cant find any hint

a ) as a confirmation that this is indeed Romanian army

b ) which sort of unit we are talking about and finally

c) does anybody has any further clues or knowledge about this?

Any help or ideas would be much appreciated!

Regards,

Marc

post-111665-0-56680000-1421783782_thumb.

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They're Austro-Hungarian

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Austrian belt buckles, Austrian caps (with the Austrian 'FJI'/ 'IJF'(or 'K' later) badge), Austrian summer-weight/fatigue tunics with their distinctive pockets and shoulder roll. Hungarian trousers.

Probably not German speaking troops, but certainly part of the Austro-Hungarian army.

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And, of course, those 'backward' Mannlicher bayonets!

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But these bayonets shown are not "backward" ... they are made with the more 'normal' blade configuration (ie. cutting edge down)

The method of attachment to the rifle is also a giveaway to model of bayonet. These show "bar on band" attachment, with LHS lug.

The rifles they are holding are the Mannlicher M1888/90 (Infanterie-Repetier-Gewehre M1888) which fitted the M1888 knife bayonet.

So yes, these are Austro-Hungarian troops. IIRC the 'embroidery' on the trousers places them more on the Hungarian side of things.?

Cheers, S>S

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But these bayonets shown are not "backward" ... they are made with the more 'normal' blade configuration (ie. cutting edge down)

The method of attachment to the rifle is also a giveaway to model of bayonet. These show "bar on band" attachment, with LHS lug.

The rifles they are holding are the Mannlicher M1888/90 (Infanterie-Repetier-Gewehre M1888) which fitted the M1888 knife bayonet.

So yes, these are Austro-Hungarian troops. IIRC the 'embroidery' on the trousers places them more on the Hungarian side of things.?

Cheers, S>S

Well spotted SS! The position of the fuller on the example on the left should have made that obvious... Ah well, blame it on jet lag - very early arrival here Tuesday morning!

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In WW1 the Austro-Hungarian Empire had control of Transylvania up until 1918 so it is likely that Romanians would have been in the Austro Hungarian army. The region, despite having a Romanian majority, was under Hungarian control for much of the last millennium. Today, it is not uncommon for some people in Transylvania to speak Hungarian, send their kids to Hungarian schools and live in Hungarian villages, while living under the flag of Romania.

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Wow guys, you are amazing Thanks a lot for the information. It does not surprise me that this should be from the Hungarian side. My grand dad was German-Romanian and lived apparently in Hermannstadt (Sibiu), which was Austrian-Hungarian at that time (what I know). The question Im asking myself is who my grand-grand dad actually is. Im trying to get a scanner to reconstruct some other images from my grand-dad so that I can compare similarities (if existant).

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... It does not surprise me that this should be from the Hungarian side. My grand dad was German-Romanian and lived apparently in Hermannstadt (Sibiu)...

I really would NOT base a family history on this snippet of information, but just for your information, http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_der_k.u.k._Kampftruppen provides the information that Hermannstadt was the base of the k.u.k. Ungarisches Infanterie Regiment "Pucherna" Nr. 31. This had a mainly Ruthenian complement, but was also 25% ethnic 'German', and they wore the Hungarian-type uniform.

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Macclesfieldman/Trajan,

Not knowing the date of the photo or the soldier's age means that they could also be Honved (Hungarian reservists, older men).

The Honved Infantry Regiment linked to the 31st KuK Infantry Regiment (using the same depot) was the 23rd.

Regards

Martin

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Not knowing the date of the photo or the soldier's age means that they could also be Honved (Hungarian reservists, older men).

The antiquated ammunition pouches would appear to indicate a 'less than 1st line' unit but they are wearing standard KuK army belt buckles which I would not expect to see on a Honved unit. The Honved usually had their own ,quite distinct, pattern buckles (as did some other units of the more Hungarian side of the KuK army to be fair) but, I suppose, if the photo is from later in the war, then anything could go, I suppose.

Dave

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I really would NOT base a family history on this snippet of information, but just for your information, http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_der_k.u.k._Kampftruppen provides the information that Hermannstadt was the base of the k.u.k. Ungarisches Infanterie Regiment "Pucherna" Nr. 31. This had a mainly Ruthenian complement, but was also 25% ethnic 'German', and they wore the Hungarian-type uniform.

While I cant base it on this snippet (agreed), it is probably a starting point to go further. thanks!

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi guys,

sorry - I have another question due to another image that cropped up. It is after WW1 and before WW2..

A postcard that says in remembrance of 1925 to 1928, Pozega, 43rd Infantry Regiment. What have these guys been doing at this time? Anybody an idea?

Cheers,

Marc

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To find out what a KUK unit was doing in the great war see the online "Austria-Hungary's last war 1914-1918" the 8 volume A-H official history.

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Hi guys,

sorry - I have another question due to another image that cropped up. It is after WW1 and before WW2..

A postcard that says in remembrance of 1925 to 1928, Pozega, 43rd Infantry Regiment. What have these guys been doing at this time? Anybody an idea?

Pozega... there seem to be a couple of places called this, but both in what would have been the Kingdom of Yugoslavia at this point. Yugoslavia did have military service in this period, so I'm guessing that i) these were conscripts remembering their time there, and ii) the 43rd Regiment was based in or around Pozega.

Assuming the reserve military units didn't get shuffled around too much over the next few years, this looks like it matches - in 1941, the 43rd Infantry mobilised in Pozega (the Croatian one) per https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/4th_Army_%28Kingdom_of_Yugoslavia%29

Andrew.

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