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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

224th Field Coy R.E


chaz
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just picked up a trio to a soldier killed 14th January 1917 and buried at Delville Wood. Sjt E C Kraske 43847 apparently a farrier who in Civvy life was a gas fitter...

looks like Ive found as much as i can regarding him but looking for more information on the 224th Field company and what they would have been doing , front line, tunnelling etc?any experts out there that can fill in a blank or two? thanks

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224th were a Field Company, so presumably general engineering works in the front lines or in support of a division. Permanently attached to 40th Division; you could try and dig out the divisional history to see where they were at this point.

The two graves next to his at Delville Wood are Pte H. Ingram 23953 (12th Yorkshires) & Sapper F.C. Atkins 61782 (224th Field Coy RE), both died on 14/1/17 as well. 12th Yorkshires were the divisional pioneer battalion (less-skilled labour). Seems quite likely all three died at the same time - perhaps a shellburst or an accident? There are no other burials at Delville for men who died on 14/1/17, and only one other from 224 Field Company for that month.

According to the CWGC papers all three were originally buried at Battery Copse - interestingly, the Concentrated Cemetery Document has Craske as a Farrier Sergeant - but again were the only deaths that day.

Andrew.

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Nothing at all in the 40th Division history:

http://access.bl.uk/item/viewer/ark:/81055/vdc_100022533723.0x000002#ark:/81055/vdc_100022533726.0x000039

A Jan 1917 trench map of the area:

http://maps.nls.uk/view/101465281

Since they were buried in a small informal cemetery, it seems likely they died on or near the spot. Battery Copse is at B20 - in a valley perhaps 4000 yards from the front line. Definitely within artillery range.

Not sure this really provides answers, but it at least rules out some possibilities!

Andrew.

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Hi

Johnboy, allready looked at the LLT thats why Im asking for more specialist info as it just gives attachment/raised and dates but no actual where and when details, need to check the diaries at the museum but trying to look at sub folders find pages non existant but am having troubles with the internnet and laptop at the moment.

Andrew, would you say being a farrier he would have been working with horses or metalworking/smithying as his civvy trade was a gas fitter.

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A farrier worked with horses as did a shoe smith. I think a shoesmith made the shoes and the farrier fitted them as well as doing any minor work on the hooves.

A smith would make metal items, stakes, parts for wagons etc.

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