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Translation/Meaning


Rusty2727
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Recently found this document on the ICRC website, but i'm struggling understand parts of it even though there is very little info on it.

Does anyone no what either D Kie or B Kie mean? also what does Nicht Verw. mean?

My final question is, on the document its say's Arras, would this be where it's saying he was picked up or is it where he would have been held just behind the German lines?

I no for a fact on the 16th April 18 my great grandfather went missing from Line Boisleux-Au-Mont, looking on google maps i see there is not a huge distance between the two areas, but i just dont no where the British and German lines were.

Hope there is some knowledgable guys that can shed some light on this for me.

Thanks

Russ.

post-55323-0-27299000-1420134912_thumb.j

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D Company? German for Company is Kompanie

Just a guess to be honest

David

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Thats what i originally thought David, but thought if they were to abbreviate it, would it not have said Komp? i'm just not sure.


thanks Phil, that sounds like a good guess to me!

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I also think Kie is correct for Kompagnie.

Siege Gunner would know.

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Maybe. And for sure it does make sense in the context of unit/sub unit title.

But I have German documents of the period which abbreviate kompanie to komp.

No reason why two different abbreviations could not have been in use of course, but the "kie" construction mirrors the French commercial practice, viz. Cie

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For providing a translation of the headings, thanks go to Bardess - click here.

A variation of Nicht Verw. seen on some occasions is Unverwundet. e.g. PA 32420

Phil

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Maybe. And for sure it does make sense in the context of unit/sub unit title.

But I have German documents of the period which abbreviate kompanie to komp.

No reason why two different abbreviations could not have been in use of course, but the "kie" construction mirrors the French commercial practice, viz. Cie

There is even a third one, SD .... 'Kp.'

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There is even a third one, SD .... 'Kp.'

How about a 4th,5th and 6th initial for the same?

...a little antiquated by the second year of the war, but certainly encountered throughout... 'C.', 'Comp.' and 'Cie.'

Quite common on hundesmarken until about 1916 (and even embossed during manufacture on some of the earlier patterns), 'C' was the only designation for company found on them prior to 1878 (when 'Comp.' became interchangeable with it). I've not yet come across one with a 'K' or 'Komp' designation that pre-dates the first few months of the war.

Dave.

(PS., Mick - you may be able to help me with something here while I'm on the subject... do you know whether the French accented 'dépôt' was in common German usage during 1914/18 (specifically 1917/18)?)

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Not off-hand, Dave, but I will keep an eye out. How 'common' would the usage have to be to qualify as 'common usage'? For typewritten material, it would also depend on 'ô' being available on the typewriter concerned.

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Hi guy's,

Is there a section on the Forum that will be able to answer questions as to where the British and German lines were around Arras in April 18?

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Hi guy's,

Is there a section on the Forum that will be able to answer questions as to where the British and German lines were around Arras in April 18?

That was at a critical time in the 'Spring Offensive' and the lines were moving very quickly westwards, as our lines were 'smashed to bits'.

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Not off-hand, Dave, but I will keep an eye out. How 'common' would the usage have to be to qualify as 'common usage'? For typewritten material, it would also depend on 'ô' being available on the typewriter concerned.

Cheers Mick.

true about the typewriter... I never thought of that! (Having once been the proud owner of an original SS type-writer with it's distinctive siegrune key I actually should have thought of it!!!)..... Anyway, my query actually regards some French PoW items (supplied by the Germans) upon which this word in it's French format appears (everything else is German making me wonder whether it actually was a word used by the Germans also).

Dave.

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Hi guy's,

Is there a section on the Forum that will be able to answer questions as to where the British and German lines were around Arras in April 18?

'The Western Front' perhaps?... 'Maps' ?... even 'Other' or 'chit chat' would probably do the trick. :thumbsup:

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