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Remembered Today:

jay dubaya

HMY Iolaire

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MBrockway

It was ever thus - I was just reading Holy Willie's Prayer only yesterday having been sent to my Burns by several pieces in the media about Auld Lang Syne.

 

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Hyacinth1326

 

Here is the quote in context : 

 

The Reverend Alasdair J. Macleod minister at Knock and Point Free Church (Continuing) on Lewis made the remarks in a piece published in the local Rudhach newsletter.

 

In the article ‘Rescued from the Iolaire’, Mr Macleod – whose grandfather Donald Macleod survived the horrific ordeal – said the tragedy was “deserved”.

He wrote: “We do not deserve to escape judgment; we have no right to expect deliverance. We have sinned continually and repeatedly against God, and earned His wrath. Tragedies like the loss of the Iolaire are nothing less than we deserve as sinners against a Holy God. We have no excuse, no defence, no answer to the judgement of God.”

 

Reflecting on his remarks, Rev Macleod told the Sun newspaper he was not referring directly to those onboard the stricken vessel but to humanity in its entirety.

He said: “I think it’s just a misunderstanding.

“I’m not intending to speak about the people on the Iolaire as individuals — I’m speaking about all humanity.”

 

 

 

 

 

Make of that what you will...

 

Edited by Hyacinth1326

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mbriscoe

It was the wrong time to say something like that as obviously going to upset some people.

 

 

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Hyacinth1326

I agree but in fairness, fundamentalists, in this case the 'Wee Frees', have been saying similar things (like John Knox on speed) for many decades, for the most part ignored or mocked.  They still wield a bit of power in the Hebrides unfortunately.

Edited by Hyacinth1326

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jay dubaya

On the water today many miles from the Beasts but never out of thought. The lives that changed in a moment and so so close to home.

 

 Rest in peace boys :poppy:

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mbriscoe

I watched the live stream last night, they ended with a list of the 800(?) from the Western Isles who died in WWI, grouped by home location, scrolling down the screen.  A captain pointed out that it is believed about 2000 died but the CWGC did not record Merchant Navy casualties.  Ones lost on the Iolaire were shown in a different colour, the numbers of those increased as they moved North up through Harris to Lewis.  It was interesting to see the numbers of areas that did not lose anyone on the Iolaire.

 

 

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mbriscoe

The Radio 4 programme this morning was very good, it will be on iPlayer or BBC Sounds or whatever they are calling it today.  They also mentioned the BBC Two Scotland programme tonight and said that would be available online.

 

Quote

DOCUMENTARY: Remembering Iolaire
On: BBC Radio 4    
Date: Tuesday 1st January 2019 (Already shown)
Time: 11:30 to 12:00 (30 minutes long)

In the early hours of January 1st 1919 the Iolaire, a naval yacht carrying servicemen home, ran aground within sight of Stornoway Harbour in the Outer Hebrides. On board were 280 men, and by dawn 201 had perished. The island of Lewis was devastated by the loss. 'Future generations will speak of it as the blackest day in the history of the island.' William Grant, founder of the Stornoway Gazette January 1919 One hundred years after the tragedy, musician Anna Murray looks at the impact it had on the community and the way in which artists have responded to the event. For many years it was hardly spoken about, and a veil of silence lay over the island. Today she discovers that art has played its part in helping heal the deep wounds created by one of the worst peacetime maritime disasters in the British Isles. Producer Mark Rickards image credit: image supplied by Acair of HMY Iolaire, photo supplied to Acair by author Malcolm MacDonald for The Darkest Dawn. Thanks.
(Stereo)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Marked By: 'Category: Documentary' marker
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Excerpt taken from DigiGuide - the world's best TV guide available from http://www.getdigiguide.tv/?p=1&r=7346

Copyright (c) GipsyMedia Limited.

 

 

I had a look on AIS at lunchtime, looked as if many of the local fishing boats were clustered around the LOCH SEAFORTH.  The Stornoay Lifeboat was also there closer to the shore, probably in case anyone slipped off the path.

 

Stornoway Gazette

 

Torchlight procession through Stornoway to remember the Iolaire

 

 

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mandy hall
On 19/12/2018 at 00:09, mbriscoe said:

DOCUMENTARY: In Sight of Home: The Iolaire
On: BBC 2 Scotland (02)    
Date: Tuesday 1st January 2019 (starting in 13 days)
Time: 22:00 to 23:00 (1 hour long)

Documentary providing a moving account of the HMY Iolaire, which tragically sank on New Year's Day 1919. Arguably the greatest tragedy to befall the west coast of Scotland remains, to this day, largely unknown. On 1 January 1919, having survived the First World War, in excess of 250 naval men were returning home to celebrate a peaceful New Year. But in the blackest of nights, in a rising gale, HMY Iolaire sank within yards of the Lewis coast. The programme features testimonies of the islanders and documents all aspects of the story, which includes tales of extraordinary bravery and foresight.
(Stereo, Widescreen, Subtitles)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Marked By: 'Category: Documentary' marker

 

The above programme is still available on BBC iPlayer.   

 

Mandy

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MichaelBully

It seemed such a horrendous tragedy.  

 

The documentary 'In Sight of Home'  documentary is also on Youtube.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1jgmBaBZsyI

 

Had been wondering what poetry has been written about it  . I have found   ‘Last Night the Iolaire Was Torn’, by Murdo MacFarlane

at this website here 

https://www.birlinn.co.uk/blog/poetic-remembrance-fallen-soldiers-great-war-tragedy-iolaire/

 

This poem is taken from Beneath Troubled Skies: Poems of Scotland at War, 1914–1918, published by The Scottish Poetry Library and Polygon.

 

"Last Night the Iolaire Was Torn

The lassie sang sweetly
in Lewis last night,
baking her bread
with a heart full of light
and thoughts of her darling,
longing for the sight
of her true love
come safely home.

The war is now over,
won by the heroes
who come home tonight:
the Iolaire’s cargo.
Put peat on the fire
and tea from the jar; Oh,
I’ll not sleep, sweetheart,
’til morning comes.

They’ll tell their tales
and we’ll listen to them,
to the feats of the sea-faring
tartan-clad men;
of the brave ones who fell
and will not rise again,
so many fine lads
who were brought down.......

 

continues on the weblink above 

 

 

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seaJane

Anne MacLeod's The Dark Ship is a novel about the Iolaire. I haven't read it, but I've heard extracts, and I think it would be worth the read.

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MichaelBully

Thanks Sea Jane ! I have just got hold of a kindle version of Anne Macleod's 'The Dark Ship'. 

 

I am quite impressed by the BBC documentary about HMY  Iolaire featuring folk musician/ composer - Iain Morrison - whose from Lewis. Mr Morrison was commissioned to write a piece for the centenary of the tragedy and came up with 'An Iolaire Sal',  His great grandfather was  one of those who died. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1-PpKyjWseQ&t=964s

 

I am reviving the Great War at Sea Poetry Project blog for a one off post about HMY  Iolaire. 

Regards 

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seaJane

Pleased to hear it :)

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MichaelBully

Greetings , I have written an introductory blogpost  about HMY Iolaire : I want to write a further piece comparing how the sinking of HMS Hampshire on 5th June 1916 was treated in 'War at Sea ' poetry compared with HMY Iolaire.  The loss of HMS Hampshire - largely due to Lord Kitchener being on board- generated more published poetry than any other War at Sea incident. HMY Iolaire  doesn't seem to compare. 

 

https://greatwaratsea.blogspot.com/

 

 

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seaJane

Thanks for the link - I will look at that later.

 

Re: HMS Hampshire, I have a photograph of Marwick Head from when I visited Orkney in 2016 - you can see the Kitchener Memorial reasonably clearly, although it's a long-distance shot. If you'd like to use it as an illustration you'll be most welcome.

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MichaelBully

Thanks Jane, image of Marwick Head would be interested. Will message you. Have finished 'The Dark Ship' , highly recommended.  A lot of the novel is about the Isle of Lewis during the Great War , and the Iolaire sinking occurs towards the end. I will post a review on Amazon UK and Good Reads . Appreciate you mentioning the book. 

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seaJane

I went to a creative writing course at which the author was one of the tutors - a very nice woman.

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