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Remembered Today:

Alfred Holloway - Tried my best but....


Simon_Fielding
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As forum pals are probably aware, my main interest is the War Memorials of my home town in Bewdley, Worcestershire. There is one main memorial in the town itself, of 75 names which I’ve ‘done’. Over the river Severn in the neighbouring parish of Wribbenhall is another memorial with some duplicated names, but some specific.

Hitting a wall with Alfred Holloway - no unit given - only commemorated on this memorial …

There is an article in a local civic society newsletter that records the purchase of some land in Wribbenhall by ‘Alfred Holloway’ who is a ‘printer’ - I can’t see him in Kelly’s Directory for 1912.

I can’t find any Bewdley Holloway of WW1 age in the 1911 - but there is a printer compositor Alfred CH Holloway born c. 1879 (in the neighbouring town of Stourport on Severn) boarding in Malvern Link in 1901. The 1891 census has an Alfred C Holloway born Stourport at the Royal Albert Orphanage in Worcester.

Alfred C H Holloway in 1881 is living in Upper Mitton Stourport on Severn with father John Thomas and mother Mary A.

What I can’t find is any military service. There is an Alfred CH Holloway killed in an industrial accident in Toxteth in 1916, but I can’t see how it’s the same man.

There’s a local farmer ACH Holloway but no parallels with Stourport or printing or Wribbenhall / Bewdley….

There’s an Alfred Holloway in the Curragh in the 1911 Irish census…

Stuck….

Bewdley

5287269986467840.png?k=oB1etw0QmSMMrvpcn

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Did the memorial cover men who had served rather than just those who died in service - if so it could be the same Holloway.

Craig

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The man killed at Toxteth was aged 37 which would fit with b.1879.

It depends on the criteria for the war memorial. There are examples of munitions workers being commemorated on local memorials although as you probably know this fatality was the result of an acetelyne cylinder being dropped.

Ken

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I am thinking again about the Toxteth man - name and age fit but he would be the first non military casualty on any of the Memorials...

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What I can’t find is any military service. There is an Alfred CH Holloway killed in an industrial accident in Toxteth in 1916, but I can’t see how it’s the same man.

The Alfred Charles Henry (age 37) killed in the accident was living at 18 Hemer Terrace, Bootle. It might be worth looking at the 1911 census and see whether he's at that address.

Craig

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Confirms they took in boarders


First

name(s)

Last

name

Relationship to household

head

Marital

condition

Gender Age Birth

year

Birth place Occupation

Joseph

Henry

Griffin Head Married Male 58 1853

Lancs

Liverpool

Clerk

Sarah Griffin Wife Married Female 52 1859 Lancs Liverpool -

Irene Winifred McDermott Servant Single Female 17 1894 Lancs Liverpool -

John Arthur Hardnace Boarder Single Male 29 1882 Lancs Liverpool

General

Carrier

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Liverpool Echo on the inquest - quite a grand set of observers - suggests munitions?

WORKS MISHAP. LIVERPOOL EXPLOSION INQUIRY. The explosion at Grayson's repairing works, Wapping, Liverpool, on the 16th ult.. was to-day investigated by the deputy dty coroner (Mr. A. G. Inglis) in resuming the inquest .three victims of the explosion: William Hearne (56), assistant storekeeper, of Kenmare-road, Sefton Park Liverpool; James Simpson (41), boilermakere' labourer, 42, Robertson-street, Toxteth Park, Liverpool; Alfred Charles Henry (37) assistant storekeeper, 18, Hemer-tcrrace' Bootle. The explosion resulted the three deaths and more or less serious injuries about forty employees of Messrs. Grayson. Mr. 11. Lindou Riley appeared for the relatives of the dead men, Mr. A. H. Procter represented Messrs. Grayson, and Mr. Hyslop Maxwell appeared for the Acetylene Illuminating Company. Major Crozier watched ihe inquiry on behalf of the Home Office. Other officials present were Messrs E. P. Inspector of Explosives for Liverpool; VV. Buchan. Inspector of Factories, Liverpool; J. Jackson, Superintendent Engineer of Factories; and Sydney Smith Dangerous Trades Inspector of Factories. Mr. Stone (who was instructing Procter) announced that all the injured persons were progrpssing favourably. three men now remained in hospital. The first witness was a labourer named Charles Corkhill, employed by Gravson's. He appeared in the box with his head bandaged, and stated that on the afternoon Thursday, the 16th ult., he was working at Grayson s South Works unloading cylinders ot' acetylene. ITearne and Holloway were assisting him. They took eight cylinders off wa them on a platform. hey had rolled one of the cylinders about two feet, when the explosion occurred. saw a yellowish-greenish flame, and remembered nothing more. Witness and the other men had been handling the cylinder carefully. They moved it gently, there was jar, and the cylinder was standing upright when the explosion occurred. John Rimmer, also employed by Gravson'e, who was injured by the explosion, stated that had nothing with the unloading of the cylinder. He happened be in the vicinity the spot where the explosion occurred. All he knew was that he was thrown into the corner behind gateway. He saw blue flame near the ground and bright red flame above. Other witnesses stated that the explosion caused a fire in the works, but this was soon subdued. Ilearne and Hollowav were described as careful workmen, who were accustomed to handling these particular cylinders. Alexander Cready. plater, made a statement. the effect that he saw a man—he could not say who was—lower one of the cylinders to within about a foot of the ground and then let the end go. soon as the cylinder touched the jrround the explosion occurred. Witness could not say whether the cylinder that struck the ground was th© one that exploded. Mr. Stephens, engineer and works manager the firm supplying the cylinder, said the cylinder in question was manufactured on August 7, 1913, and had been circulation from that date until the date the explosion. The cylinders were re-tested periodically. Their average .life was ten years. All the Home Office regulations had been complied with. The Acetvlene Company had at present between 24,000 and 25,000 cylinders in circulation They had been handling the cylinders for fourteen years, and there had been two fatal accidents up to the time of this explosion The cylinder in question was last refilled November. In reply to Mr. Procter, witness agreed that vacant space in the cylinder meant a pocket free gas, whioh was liable to deterioration and explosion.

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Can't see any other ACH Holloway dying in the war years so have gambled 9GBP on the Toxteth man's death certificate...Will keep you posted.

Would be good to have some info on the firm - Graysons, Wapping Dock?

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Embarrassingly there's a Roll of honour I'd missed that lists Holloway as a 'Ships printer' 'merchant service 'which is useful - d' oh....

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... and surprise surprise I can't find him on any Merchant Navy databases...

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Still getting nothing on the Ancestry MN medal rolls - any other suggestions?

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Simon, looking at the inquest details I would guess that Grayson's is most likely to be a ship / marine equipment repair facility? The acetylene would have been supplied for welding - the company named have some wartime adverts online for supplying welding sets - and presumably this incident occurred during a delivery, which explains the occupations of "storekeeper" for some of the dead. Two other occupations of note are "plater" and "boilermaker's labourer" so this points to it being a metal repair facility, presumably engaged on war work?

Edit to add - found them! Graysons were Liverpool ship builders until the 1920s http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/maritime/archive/info-sheet.aspx?sheetId=32

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Still getting nothing on the Ancestry MN medal rolls - any other suggestions?

I suspect it probably is the same man - killed in a factory explosion and either never in the army overseas (hence no MIC) /never served due to his employment.

Embarrassingly there's a Roll of honour I'd missed that lists Holloway as a 'Ships printer' 'merchant service 'which is useful - d' oh....

Any idea (other than the obvious) what a 'ships printer' is ?. If it meant he was a printer in the traditional meaning then surely only a very large ship would have need of such services unless he was shore based.

Craig

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Grayson Rollo and Clover Docks

Note: Grayson Rollo and Clover was a ship repair facility on the River Mersey. It closed in the 1980s after which the workshops were demolished and the graving docks filled in. The area has been redeveloped with apartments, offices and small business units.

http://www.benjidog.co.uk/Geoff%20Topp%20Postcards/Liverpool%20Docks.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grayson_Rollo_and_Clover_Docks

I wonder if it's the same company.

Craig

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Yes Craig it is. There's a book which has bits available online called "The Economics of Shipbuilding in the United Kingdom" which says that Grayson's and two other ship-builders amalgamated in 1928 to form this Company. Link here https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=QRQMcLmTRuwC&pg=PA29#v=onepage&q&f=false

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A long shot may be to see if Liverpool Archives hold anything thing from the solicitors who represented the deceased - Mr J A Behn of 139 Dale Street, Liverpool - in respect of the case.

Craig

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I am trying to research my Grandfathers War records. I have recently inherited his medals and other than finding his medal card I have drawn a blank. Information I have obtained so far is that he served with the Worcestershire Regiment and entered France on 19/12/1914. I am interested to find out more any pointers would be gratefully appreciated. His name and number is Pte Walter Painter 17856. Any info at all would be great, thanks.

David.

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David - start a new thread with a separate title, rather than posting in someone else's. You'll get better answers that way.

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Thanks Heather and Craig - useful data, logical suggestions. I think Worcestershire man, failed land deal, goes to sea (no 1911 census) laid off in Liverpool, gets war work, killed in accident.

There's a death cert. on its way, and someone's checking the Bootle papers for me. Will let you know.

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Given the type of work involved I guess that as P and O ships etc were converted to war work opportunities became limited for preparing programmes on board!

I couldn't find him on M. Marine databases either.

Ken

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Here's the death cert. which confirms name and age at least:

post-50-0-18729500-1420481004_thumb.png

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