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Remembered Today:

any diary entries?


spaspeckerthedull
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hello all - new to the site so hope i'm posting in the correct section

tying to research my Great Grandfather. Pte Ernest Shaw 90570 2nd Gn Btn Kings Liverpool (formerly 44034 Cheshires) died age 34 salonika, 11/11/18 and buried kirechkoi hortakoi. This much I know.

What I am trying to establish is how he eventually arrived in salonika, and by what route? I know he joined the Cheshires in his (and mine) home town of Chorley, Lancs on June 6th 1916. I do not know if he was conscripted. How do I research diary entries for the branch of the army he was attached to? I have written with no success to both the Cheshire and Kings Liverpool secretaries - all I got was "the records were probably destroyed"

I have in my possession his dog tags, Kings cap badge, letters to home, postcards to home, photos to and from home, a brittle fold out colour painted postcard of salonika (viewed as from a boat) the original telegram informing his wife (my Great Grandmother) of his death, plus letters of correspondence confirming same from the War Office, Buckingham Palace etc

I would like to build up a log of how he arrived in salonika, and the route he took to get there. One postcard I have of his sent home is from "Landing stage Liverpool"

post-101089-0-25029700-1419892920_thumb.

another is from, I believe, Le Mans

post-101089-0-46229300-1419892939_thumb.

but I have no picture postcards from salonika, just letters and photos. How did he end up in Le Mans? Why was he there?

anybody?

thanks in advance

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A good place to start is the forum's parent site 'The Long Long Trail' (link at the top of the home page) once there select 'Formations' then 'British Divisions' and if it's the 2nd Cheshires then '28th Division' there you will find a brief history of the division.

Next get a copy of 'Under the Devils Eye' by Wakefield and Moody, this book covers the activities of the British Salonika Force and for a broader view of the whole Balkan campaign 'The Gardeners of Salonika' by Alan Palmer is recommended.

If the 2nd Cheshires war diary exists it will be at the National Archives at kew, a search on their website will confirm this. Unfortunately the Salonika campaign war diaries have not been digitised yet so a trip to Kew will be required.

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Another thing, do you know what he died from?

The armistice with the Bulgarians was signed on the 30th of September 1918, your Gt Grandfather died 6 weeks later in mid November, could have been from wounds but most likely influenza.

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Another thing, do you know what he died from?

The armistice with the Bulgarians was signed on the 30th of September 1918, your Gt Grandfather died 6 weeks later in mid November, could have been from wounds but most likely influenza.

he died 14:30 11/11/18 from broncho pneumonia and malaria, I have the original telegram sent to his wife (my Great Grandmother)

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His medal index card, and rolls only show the King's Liverpool Regiment. He may have enlisted in the Cheshire Regiment but he does not appear to have served overseas with them.

As noted above the LLT gives a guide to the disposition of Battalions http://www.1914-1918.net/kings.htm

He may have joined them in Egypt as a replacement, or he may have gone with them to Salonika in January 1917 when they were employed as line of communication troops until the 27th August 1917 where they joined 228th Brigade 28th Division, again as reference above the LLT http://www.1914-1918.net/kings.htm The battalion took part in the capture of Barakli and Kumli. In 1918 following the losses of the German Spring Offensive many elements of the Division were sent to France but the King's Battalion remained in Salonika. See below he almost certainly join the Bn in November 1917.

On the 30th September 1918 the Division moved to Macedonia, though it seems likely he was already hospitalised by then.

Given his date of enlistment he could either have been a Derby Scheme volunteer or conscript. as he was in a local Regiment the former seems most likely, his age might help to establish which group he was in. Typically Garrison troops were employed as Line of Communication troops as they tended to be less fit men, however given the unique nature of the Salonika campaign it seems they were formed into a more active brigade.

I can't find a war diary for the Battalion, there are two entries at TNA for 228 Brigade but the links I have are out of date.

There is a limited pension record for a soldier transferred to the 2nd Garrison Battalion on 11th October 1917 and renumbered 90589. No details of his journey to Salonika.

There is a service record for Pte 90541 Cowell he was on the ship Partridge II and disembarked at Itea Greece on the 24th October 1917. He arrived No 2 Base Depot Salonika on the 2/11/1917 on the 7th he left join his Battalion 'in the field arriving on 13/11/1917. 90547 also transferred on 11/10/1917.

The closest I've found is 90566 who originally enlisted in the Cheshire Regiment and was on 'Home Service' with the 3rd Garrison Bn Cheshire Regiment, again transferring to the King's on 11/10/1917, nope the closest is 90572 Taylor previously Cheshire Regiment his record shows his home postings and he too went on HMT Partridge II as above as did 90576 Webb also transferred from 3rd Garrison Bn Cheshire Regt. My guess is 90570 was in the same draft.

All of the above suffered from malaria a number had defective eyesight, hence the initial Home Service.

Can't help with the Le Mans postcard.

Ken

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Given the dangers of submarine attack in the Mediterranean, troops frequently went overland through France to Marseilles so it's possible he had a short stop at Le Mans.

Keith

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