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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Medical Terminology


alantwo
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I have come across two anaesthetics used in operations on board HMHS Assaye described as "CH3CL + Ether" and "CHCL3". I take them to be some form of chloroform but can anyone tell me something about them and what the letters stand for? Is there any difference between the two; would they have been used for different types of operation for example?

Thanks in advance.

Regards

Alan

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combinations of inhalant anesthetics were commonly used at that era, if available. The theory was that adequate anesthesia would be maintained, with fewer side effects.

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The letters are the chemical formulae. C carbon, H hydrogen, Cl Chlorine.

Ron

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Thanks to all for your contributions. I'm not sure I understand why a refrigerant is being used, is it simply a clerical error? But that in its self seems odd, a surgeon or nurse making the entry would know the difference. It is also recorded as "+ Ether", thus even a clerical error is strange, why have two types of anaesthetic? Thanks again, I'll keep digging.

Regards

Alan

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Chloromethane is (was) not just used as a refrigerant and obviously this use is not applicable in this context.

However, it has been used as a local anesthetic, which would certainly be relevant.

SEE HERE.

(It is also mentioned in JWK's link in #2).

CGM

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