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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Whose mine


LarsA
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Lars

Maybe Russian. Here a link or two,the first gives a story on the Gulf of Finland about mines and storage,and the second is almost your pic made into a fireplace !!

http://www.marinemine.com/mine/

http://www.marinemine.com/category/fireplaces/

Hopefully,they cleaned the cases thoroughly before setting a fire.

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Båstad is on the west coast of Sweden, near Jutland and Scagerack. It could have drifted of course, thanks for the input. Unfortunately the horns are missing - i have a couple of british horns i'll try to fit next time.

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To me a Russian mine wouldn't be that likely on the west coast of Sweden where Båstad is. If it is a real mine casing that was recovered locally it'd be far more likely to be a German or, perhaps, British mine.

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An open mind is necessary at this stage,until someone can identify it positively. Tidal currents are very resourceful,as are metal dealers !

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It is a real casing, put in place in 1922. WWI. I suspect british, but would be nice to know. Realize I should have taken a close up of the horn fittings, to me they looked similar to the horns i have from british mines.

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Surely this is a standard 150 kg German contact mine?

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Except that British mines from 1917 on were copies of German mines. And there were a lot more British mines in the North Sea than German mines.

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Except that British mines from 1917 on were copies of German mines. And there were a lot more British mines in the North Sea than German mines.

Looks and location are the only clues we have so far.

Looks are consistent with a German C/12 type contact mine, and large number of these were used around the entrance to the Baltic in order to prevent the British Fleet from forcing a way through - so quite conceiveable one found its way on to the beach at Bastad, on the shores of the Skaggerak.

British naval mines were considered fairly unreliable up until the introduction of the H.II mine in 1917. Having recovered unexploded German naval mines, and studyed the triggering mechanisms, the Royal Navy 'copied' the German developed Hertz horns as the firing initiator - but the body shape of the Royal Navy Mark II naval mine was spherical (so it can't be the Bastad mine shown in the picture).

Hertz horns were tubes made of soft metal. Inside of the tube was a glass vial containing sulphuric acid which would break on contact and the acid would run into a battery. Once activated the battery would then detonate the mine. Earlier WW1 British contact mines had been making use of firing levers to explode the mine.

Edited by KizmeRD
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KizmeRD--Having looked at a number of images of the German C/12 type sea mine-I could not see an attaching ring-which this particular mine does have.

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KizmeRD--Having looked at a number of images of the German C/12 type sea mine-I could not see an attaching ring-which this particular mine does have.

Isn't the lifting eye that small vertical protruberance seen side-on at the top of the pictured mine?

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Correct- and that is what I did not see on the images of the German C/12 mine on the internet

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Jim,

Have a look at the following link which shows a German horned contact mone type C/12 sitting outside the naval memorial in Laboe (complete with lifting ring).

http://www.pbase.com/calaf/image/137885252

If this is not the same type as in the Bastad picture, then what what are you suggesting it might be?

Michael

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I thought sotonmate's Russian mine to be more likely,in terms of appearance

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I thought sotonmate's Russian mine to be more likely,in terms of appearance

What type of Russian mine are you referring to? Only I'm not aware of any WW1 Russian contact mine using Herzt horn detonators with hemispherical top and botom and a cylindrical mid-section; but I'd be happy to be proved wrong.

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