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Remembered Today:

casualty clearing station 21 La Neuville


Kev R
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A relative of mine passed through cc21 at La Neuville near Corbie in 1916, I guess this would have been close to the military cemetery there. I found the attched photo on the web and am intrigued now to establish where exactly this would have been, it looks to be a solid structure and would be great to visit if it still stands. I've checked a 1918 trench map and nothing is noted, anyone any ideas?post-112779-0-87642400-1416389611_thumb.

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Hello Kev

It probably wouldn't be shown on a trench map anyway, as that was not what trench maps were for.

Most hospitals and casualty clearing stations were set up in public buildings such as schools, or sometimes in factories and the like which had ceased production because of the war. I can't help you in detail, I'm afraid, but the photo does look as if it might be a hall or gym in a school, or something like a church hall or other community building.

Ron

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Cheers for your thoughts guys. Would be great to find the building if it still exists. Perhaps there's some local history group or something I can try there. Was over there near Corbie earlier this year, ironicaly but knew nothing of this at the time.

Would there have been any maps of the locations do you think that could be chased down?

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The CCS itself will probably have a War Diary in class WO95 in the National Archives at Kew, or the diary of the Deputy Director of Medical Services, Fourth Army may tell you.

Neither of these have been digitised yet so a personal visit to Kew may be necessary.

Ron

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Ah ok, didn't realise the ccs's had war diaries, may be worth a trip.

Many thanks

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21 CCS appears to have been under 3rd Army, not 4th. As you can see for the catalogue description, the 21 CCS diary is part of the present digitisation programme http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/C7350077 so double-check it's availablity before making a trip!

The schedule http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/first-world-war/centenary-unit-war-diaries/diaries-unavailable-reading-rooms/ suggests it won't be available until the new year, and it is hsowing as unorderable at the moment (in use).

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Thanks for the heads up David, will keep an eye on it

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  • 2 years later...

Found out one of my great uncles on my father's side was in The Royal Irish Rifles and was wounded during the WW1 conflict the Battle of Guillemot/Ginchy during The Somme and was taken to CCS 21 Corbie. He died of his wounds and I found out he was buried at La Neville British Cemetery, Corbie France... Is there any further information re the CCS or how far it is from the cemetery. Any info greatly appreciated.. Sandra

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Hi Sandra and welcome to the Forum. The War Diary for 01/07/1916 reads:

 

Commenced using cemetery in field adjoining CCS

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  • 2 years later...

Hello

I am married to a lady who comes from Corbie so I visit the town a few times a year.

I know the approximate location of the hospital as I spoke to a local whilst walking around la Neuville who told me that the factory nearby had been used as a hospital in the war and the wounded came in via an industrial branch line from the nearby Corbie station.  This still exists in part.and I wandered round the site but much of it was fenced off so I could not compare the existing buildings with your photo.  I will try to find out more with the help of one of my wife's relations who has a friend in la Neuville with an interest in local history.

Can you please email your picture to me so I can leave it with my relation.  It may also help me to get access to the site when I am next in Corbie.  The factory buildings can still be seen via Google earth but only from above so it is difficult to compare window shapes.

I will of course keep you posted on any arising information.

Cheers

Andy Feest

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  • 2 weeks later...

Assuming the attachment opens, there is this, extracted from Medical Services General History, Volume III, Chapter II The Somme Battles of 1916. 

 image.png.f6feb2ebf770687b0be6dc5625c992e8.png

Edited by michaelpi
speling
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  • 2 weeks later...
Hello,
my name is Sébastien and I am part of an association that deals with the history of Corbie.
I will try to help you, tomorrow we have an association meeting, I will question the elders to complete what I know!
The CCS 21 was well in Neuville, a district of Corbie in the Somme, there is only part of the building, it is an old farm just next to the factory that you mention, the owner does not accept visits, but on your way to the British cemetery you can see the remains of the farm. The CCS opened in April 1916 and closed in March 1917, a path made it possible to connect the CCS 21 to the Canal de la Somme, there was a quay which made it possible to evacuate the wounded by barges to Amiens.
Sorry for my rough English translated by google.
I will return to the forum as soon as I have gathered the additional information.
Have a good day!
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Sébastien,

 

very many thanks for your kind offer and welcome to the Forum!

 

We will be very interested in what you may be able to uncover about this hospital.

 

    David

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Thank you Sebastien.

 

It's rather sad to see it in such a state. 

 

   David.

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Hello everyone, although my question is not about 21 CCS but I was  wondering amongst the knowledge of this forum does anyone have information on a CCS based at Conray?

and No3 CCS Puchevillers.

Extract from my Grandfathers diary:- "There was nothing for it but to get back to the ADS where Byers dressed my hand, and away by car to Acheux. The ADMS saw me and asked me to stay if possible to give a hand in office. Huggins who examined the wound advised me to go on the CCS. I took a car to Conray but found it shut. Finally I found myself at the above.

(No3 CCS). Captain Hey operated on me."

Any info would be greatfully accepted

Thanks

Dave D

 

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Dave, 3 CCS was based in Puchevillers from 16 May 1916 to 6 March 1917.  Contay had 49 CCS from 14 August 1916 until 26 March 1917 and 9 CCS from 25 September 1916 to 19 March 1917.  Contay is around 8 km from Puchevillers as the cocky flies.

 

Information on all CCS etc available at http://www.vlib.us/medical/CCS/ccs.htm?fbclid=IwAR26S_NbZ42dkjyeIZht-z7wf66njXQI3-jAI6M-sdCoeM9w9Q2j-Z1Zy-c#page 1 and the Long Long Trail also has a page at https://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/regiments-and-corps/british-base-hospitals-in-france/.

 

 

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Thank you very much for info WhiteStarLine. Just wondering why 49CCS was closed on the 28th August, most likely overloaded. Dave D

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