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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

WAAC/QMAAC


Compo

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Women in the Great War is a terrific idea.

Information on the Web on Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps seems to be quite sparse. I know that they were a civilian organisation in uniform under Army orders and they undertook Line of Communication tasks to free up male soldiers for the front.

These activities I have gathered were:

Postal sorters, cooks, telegraphists.

Were there other activities? Anyone know of a good source of information?

My grandmother's sister was a Fore Woman and received Victory and British medals on her MIC. If QMAAC were not military how come medals? They were also entitled to the MM for galantry.

According to family stories, she drove a truck in France and blatantly frequently disobeyed orders not to stop for wounded. Lending some credence to this, she did receive an O.B.E. on the other hand I do not know why she was not busted to the ranks for this.

I connot identify a QMAAC activity that would have her driving a truck near wounded men, unless she was perhaps delivering the mail to the front, can anyone help to assess the likelyhood of the story?

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OK, thanks to Regiments.org I an now add:

Catering, storekeeping, clerical work, telephony and administration, printing, motor vehicle maintenance.

Any advances?

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QMAAC was a corps of the British Army founded 1917 as WAAC - becoming QMAAC in 1918.

Its predecessor, The Women's Legion, was a civilian unit also undertaking those duties you mention.

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Compo

This photo [iWMQ5956] is captioned:

WAAC Drivers attending to the engine of an officer's car, Abbeville, 15 September, 1917

"Large numbers of WAACs served at the Advanced Mechanical Transport Depot which was situated at Abbeville. They not only ran the stores, and organised the paperowrk which kept hundreds of the Army's motor vehicles on the road, but they also drove the cars, and carried out some of the basic day to day servicing. Motor transport might have been the latest in technological innovation, but other resources were still very basic; the women are using a leather bucket to hold water for cleaning the car."

Sue

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As it happens I just returned from a trip where I photograped 26 female graves for a project. Many QMAAC among them. Below an example.

forum62.jpg

Regards,

Marco

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Theres a thing...I've never seen medals to the Qmaac...any idea of their price..single/pair/trio?

I have a pair to Worker Dinah Kerr, QMAAC.

I am in the early days of researching her. By the way many of the MIC's for ladies are now on line.

Cheers.

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There is a pair to a QMAAC on ebay for just over 80 quid (buy now).

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QMAAC medals are not at all rare. Every dealer normally has a few in stock. The one on eBay has yet to attract a bid and at C$180 seems plenty on the high side as an end price let alone a starting price. The service number of the recipient is 49552 and I have seen service numbers well above this so assume tens of thousands were issued. Now, gallantry medals to the QMAAC will be rare for they generally served well behind the lines or on the home front where heroic action was not necessary.

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  • 13 years later...

I have two photographs which I am attaching:  Group photograph containing my Grandfather, Roydon Williard James Macleod (5th from the left) and seated among the men are members of Queen Mary's Army Auxillary Corp.  I cannot recognise my  Grandmother 

(Hilda Mary Duncan) in the group but she was there in Rouen, as a clerk, and that is where the two met.  They married in London in 1919, and soon after left their services. My grandfather was a performer (tap dance, banjo, magic show) and I am sure he would have been in concerts where Hilda joined him on stage to be sawn in half.  Can anyone suggest where else I might put up the group photo as others might recognise their relatives? 

27018963_10214714783726718_860466732_o (2).jpg

NAN and POP WEDDING.jpg

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