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Casualty route from France to England 1918


thegrove

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My grandfather was gassed along with 300 or so men from 10th Battalion Sherwood Foresters on 15th August 1918 http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=86150&p=800996 . He was treated at the 53rd Casualty Clearing station. A fellow serviceman was also injured in the same incident and was moved onto 6th General Hospital at Rouen, where sadly he later died. My grandfather returned to the UK and I understand was despatched to a hospital in the west of Scotland, maybe Glasgow.

Was there a regular pattern to the evacuation route for casualties which I may be able to infer even though his own service records do not survive?

Thanks.

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I think you've already got it pretty much worked out as best as will be able.

After treatment at the CCS, he would have gone to either a General or Stataionary Hospital in France (looks like Rouen would be a good bet), or he would have been evacuated directly back to the UK, going to wherever had beds available. Impossible to say, without his servce file.

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Hello thegrove

I don't think that there was a regular pattern. It would depend on a number of factors such as:

- the severity of injuries, which might reduce the distance e a man could safely travel;

- closeness to the man's home, which might facilitate family visits or contact with his regimental depot for posting after recovery;

- the simple availability of hospital space.

There may have been other factors too. The location of surgical expertise in fields such as facial reconstruction or the provision of artificial limbs are cases in point.

Ron

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I think most casualties that from the Etaples / Boulogne came into Dover rather than Folkestone, as the latter saw most troop departures and it would not be good for departing troops to see the casualties arriving at the same time. If they came from Rouen the Southampton would be the likely port to receive them. I've not seen much evidence of Hospital ships arriving in Folkestone.

John

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Folkestone wasn't used for incoming hospital ships - Dover and Southampton received almost all of them, about half and half, with a small numbers to other ports such as Avonmouth and Tilbury.

Sue

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  • 3 months later...

My great Grandfather Samuel E fletcher 26681 a member of the 4th guards 4th coy 16th platoon was captured on the 13th or 14th April 1918

he later died of a spinal injury on the 17th while in captivity..I received this info from the red cross data base..can anyone point me to diary which

might cover this period of the battle..the same in which Capt TT Pryce was killed as the guards had to deal with rear and flank attacks by Germans from around La Couronne.....in addition what is the likelihood that my Great Grandfather could have been tortured for information..thanks Rex

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Hi Rexf

You would be better starting a new topic as your questions are not linked to this thread.

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Hi Rex,

If this is the kind of thing that you are after http://www.1914-1918.net/Diaries/wardiary-4grenadier.html the battalion, brigade, and division war diaries are available for download for a small fee from the National Archive.http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/records/war-diaries-ww1.htm They probably won't contain a better account though than from the 1st link above, which is most probably extracted from one of them anyway.

The brigade and division dairies will probably contain a greater range of documents to augment the battalion diary.

The content headlines of each of the diaries can be viewed free on http://www.nmarchive.com/search-the-war-diaries You could take out a membership with that site and download the documents, but unless you want a lot, the National Archive is a cheaper option.

Regards

Chris

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As regards repatriation of the wounded back to Britain for treatment.Many were taken to Netley Victorian Military Hospital on the east side of the Solent,initially by ship.The hospital apparently had a pierhead but apparently it was found not to be able to handle seagoing ships.

Consequently the wounded were taken into Southampton then must have been relayed to Netley Hospital by rail. At the time the hospital had its own railway station which would appear to be off the Southampton - Fareham line

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  • 2 weeks later...
Guest kwink31

My Great grandfather (back row 2nd from left) was a member of the Halifax Rifles of the CEF. He joined in 1915 by lying about his age (he was too old). He fought at Vimy Ridge. He was wounded (shot in the leg and gassed- maybe at Hill 70?). He was admitted to the Etaples Hospital Aug 25th 1917. When he was evacuated, he was placed in Sholden Lodge in Kent. The men in the picture appear to be from several different units although their jackets look to be hospital issue. Sholden Lodge was located in Deal Kent. In 1915 the owner James Edgar, 3 times Mayor of Deal, allowed the house to be used as an Auxiliary Hospital and his 5 daughters worked as Nurses.

Any information about the picture would be appreciated.

The other picture is from his Bible but I cannot decipher the location.

post-121418-0-25944100-1428544100_thumb.post-121418-0-00650000-1428544300_thumb.

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  • 3 months later...

my ancestor was one of the casualities from this gas attack and he went to the military hospital at le treport were he died and was buried in mont huon. he was from the west coast of ireland.

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my ancestor was one of these men he was sent to the hospital at le treport on the coast and died there and is buried in mont huon. so these men seemed to be fairly spread out.

The final hospital they ended up in could depend on how busy the hospital was and what injury they had.

Craig

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The other picture is from his Bible but I cannot decipher the location.

attachicon.gifHJA Site of being Wounded.jpgattachicon.gif

Looks like "Citié St-Pire [or Pierre], nr. Lens, France" to me, but I can't find it on the map. One of the many mines round Lens was called St-Pierre, however. https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fosse_n%C2%B0_11_-_19_des_mines_de_Lens

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