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Remembered Today:

The Man Who Shot The Great War


W.J.Caughey
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DoubleBand Films' The Man Who Shot The Great War airs on BBC One Northern Ireland on Monday, November 17 at 9.00pm.

A new BBC Northern Ireland film, The Man Who Shot The Great War, tells the remarkable story of Lance Corporal George Hackney, 36th Ulster Division, born in Belfast in 1888. For the first time, viewers will get to see some of the most evocative images he shot and follow George’s own ethical and spiritual journey. Documented in his diaries, the film explores the profound effect war had on him. What transformed a man from fighter to pacifist, from Presbyterian Elder to the man looking for answers and embracing a new eastern religion, the Bahá’í faith, in later life.

Enjoy

http://www.northernirelandscreen.co.uk/news/3755/double-band-films-the-man-who-shot-the-great-war.aspx

W.J. Caughey

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Saw this advertised on the news this morning, looks remarkable. Didn't realise I could get BBC 1 NI on Sky, but now set to record. Thanks for the heads-up.

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Absolutely brilliant Walter. I am really looking forward to this one.

Many thanks

Anne

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An excellent production.

It " got" to me , and left me feeling disturbed ; I find it hard to explain why....we've seen so many programmes with this kind of theme, we could almost be inured to the renditions about PTSD and the dismal legacies of the Great War ; but this had that " something extra" that I found rather shattering.

Maybe it's a " less is more" syndrome ; a sort of understated delivery.

Whatever it is, it worked extremely well, for me at least.

Phil (PJA)

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An excellent production.

Whatever it is, it worked extremely well, for me at least.

Yes quite agree. The photographer was a "natural". The images are extraordinary.

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Watched this programme the other night and was amazed at the quality of the photographs. I believe they are to go on display in the Ulster Museum in Belfast soon and if that is the case, It'll certainly be worth a trip.

Steve

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A fantastic programme. I agree with Phil that this certainly had "something extra".

Anne

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And a great credit to GWF member Mark Scott who spent unbelievable hours/years researching this remarkable story.

Well done Mark. An update on Ulster Museum display if possible?

Walter.

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The album I described in 2004 was one of a number in private hands in Northern Ireland. It is generally thought that George Hackney had probably made up some albums for old comrades as a an understandable souvenir of wartime experience. The one under examination in the programme was the album presented to Ulster Museum by Hackney himself.

I knew how powerful it was in 2004 but was sadly unable to convince the owner to let it be seen by public as the original thread explains.

When the Ulster Museum copy was found by the film-makers in 2012/13 they must have googled Hackney and came up with my stuff. They asked me for a few pointers. I think they were hoping that his 'lost diary' might be with the same person I spoke to back in 2004 but all I was able to do was point them in the right direction.

I have only one mild criticism of the prog ...I would have liked more explanation of what the YCVs were (and more importantly were not) which would have been invaluable for context. I concur with the applause for Mark Scott. His commitment to the project was obvious.

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Des - Yes, I recall mention of the lost diary in the programme. Would Hackney have given it away with a duplicate album? Quite right about the YCVs requiring more elucidation.

So Hackney's album had been in the museum for years. Presumably you did not know it was there?

But so pleasing to see these great images.

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I still have shivers when I think of seeing the German surrender pic for first time.

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I still have shivers when I think of seeing the German surrender pic for first time.

Yes, that was chilling.

The programme actually upset me : that testifies to its unique quality.

Phil (PJA)

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Yes, I watched this again tonight and would consider it the best and most thought provoking TV programme in the current Great War crop. Hackney was an extraordinary man.

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Just a pity Doubleband did not give full credits for the research. I note the various comments regarding Mark, but traceing the locations of the photographs was entrusted to Amanda Moreno and I can vouch for the countless hours spend pondering over the photos, war diaries and trench maps and locating to within yards where George Hackney took many of his photographs. Having travelled out the week before the film crew Amanda Mark and myself carried out the field recce to confirm the locations, after several differences of opinions both historic and Esoteric we were able to cover most of the periods when George was on the Western Front.

It is sad to think of how much film was left on the cutting room floor, so many interesting shots and images, that the programme could have run all night - not just the one hour

Faugh a Ballagh

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It is sad to think of how much film was left on the cutting room floor, so many interesting shots and images, that the programme could have run all night - not just the one hour

Faugh a Ballagh

Perhaps a Hackney tour could be organised.

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Looks like Joe public ain't going to see much more, according to The Independent.

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/history/previously-unseen-ww1-moments-revealed-in-photographs-by-soldier-george-hackney-9866308.html

"The album will be on public show in the new Modern History gallery at the Ulster Museum in Belfast from 26th November. Visitors to the Ulster Museum will be able to view a selection of images from the album via an interactive audio visual presentation."

W.J.

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I still have shivers when I think of seeing the German surrender pic for first time.

My exact feelings when I saw the image! What a tremendous find. i have to go back and watch again.

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Truly an excellent programme :poppy:

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Looks like Joe public ain't going to see much more, according to The Independent.

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/history/previously-unseen-ww1-moments-revealed-in-photographs-by-soldier-george-hackney-9866308.html

"The album will be on public show in the new Modern History gallery at the Ulster Museum in Belfast from 26th November. Visitors to the Ulster Museum will be able to view a selection of images from the album via an interactive audio visual presentation."

W.J.

Thanks for the update Walter. It does sound as if we'll not see much more which is a pity. Still, I look forward to going over to the museum.

It was a remarkable programme. Full credit to all those involved in bringing it to fruition. I'm going to iPlayer it and watch it again.

I fully concur with the point Des makes on the YCV's.

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