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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

A new memorial park at Woodenbridge, Co. Wicklow, Ireland


Michael Pegum

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This memorial park, with 1,200 names of Wicklow men and women who died in the Great War, was opened on 18th September.

(The name of the village predates the bridge in the background. Obviously.)

Michael

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The latest number for Wicklow casualties stands at 767. I may be a few out but not 400. I tried to get a 'criteria for inclusion' for this memorial without success.

Cheers.

Tom.

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The latest number for Wicklow casualties stands at 767. I may be a few out but not 400. I tried to get a 'criteria for inclusion' for this memorial without success.

I am trying to get in touch with the historian concerned myself. One of the names is of someone who survived the sinking of the 'Leinster'. I will be putting all the names up on irishwarmemorials.ie as soon as I can get them transcribed.

presume a link to John Redmond? Located near where the eponymous speech was made I believe.

Yes, Two days after the signing of the Irish Home Rule Bill, John Redmond gave a speech at Woodenbridge, near this site, urging Irishmen to fight "in defence of right, of freedom and religion in this war". A video about the memorial, and a reading of the speech, can be seen at the Irish Times.

An extra note: at the end of the video, the cameral focusses on the name of Willie Redmond, M.P., John Redmond's brother, who was killed in action. The name beneath his is Clement Robertson, who was awarded the V.C.

Michael

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Hello Michael.

'I am trying to get in touch with the historian concerned myself. One of the names is of someone who survived the sinking of the 'Leinster'. I will be putting all the names up on irishwarmemorials.ie as soon as I can get them transcribed.'

I would be very interested in his reply also.

KInd regards.

Tom.

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Very interesting, thanks Michael. I'll take a closer look at the weekend.

Btw Tom, although I found your book on the Wicklow War Dead of WWI and WWII quite interesting I noted at the time - and this was a couple of years ago so bear with me re my failing recollection - it missed out on some notable flying service casualties of both wars, e.g. Garland in WWII (a VC winner).

I'm fairly sure that your ongoing brilliant and painstaking research on the Dublin casualties of the Great War has turned up hundreds for other counties, and would imagine that you've quite a lot to add to any revised edition of existing publications.

I've approximately 200 Irish-born flying services casualties that don't appear among the c.300 featured in Ireland's War Memorials. On that ratio I'd imagine that there's quite a lot of under-representation in certain published sources. On the other hand I've come across 50 aviators in IWM that are of Irish ancestry and another 50 or so that are of some quite tenuous connection to Ireland, e.g. they'd served in an Irish regiment prior to transferring to the RFC.

Depending upon the criteria the Woodenbridge memorial committee used they could well end up with all sorts of extras, e.g. Moutray Read VC is as English as warm ale, cricket greens, dog lovers and whatever but his mother was living in Wicklow, so there's an Irish next-of-ken address on some of the obituaries etc. According to the Irish Times of 11 December 1915 his brother in law was District Inspector F St L Tyrrell of Wicklow. Don't be surprised therefore to see him make an appearance as both an Irish and a Wicklow casualty even though he probably would struggle to have identified it on a map.

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Hello Airshipped.

Many thanks for your kind words. As you would realise each of the war dead books are under constant updating and as each 'undone' newspaper is scanned for info new 'missed' county casualties appear and are entered. So far 33 newspapers are now completed and threw up a few unknowns and extra information on those unfortunate Irish casualties. Its like making a ship from matches, from the outside it looks boring and tedious but in fact its very invigorating as I am sure you know.

I added the WW2 Wicklow names that I found in the CWGC and the Wicklow papers to the Wicklow book as that was the only method of finding them. The reason it has both wars was I did not think there was enough WW1 lads.

Here are a few places to consider, why do you think these places would give a researcher a problem? Gorey, Bray, Drogheda, Carrick-on-Suir,? They are in two counties. The worst of all is the famous Ballaghaderreen, besides the zillion ways of spelling it, its in three counties.

I had thought that the Woodenbridge memorial might have added all of the Bray and Gorey casualties and that should have bumped up the figures, who knows.?

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This looks like a fitting memorial Park, I look forward to visiting it over the Christmas. Peter

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This memorial, which has 1154 names, is now up on the irishwarmemorials.ie website, here. A full transcript, in PDF format, can be downloaded.

I have had no response from the historian involved.

Michael

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