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Remembered Today:

Seaforth Highlanders


blinky
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My great uncle was in the seaforth highlanders before moving to the machine gun corp .I have a lovely photo of him in his seaforth uniform ,upon looking at other photos of the uniform have noticed that the sporrans were different colours ,does anyone know why ?

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Which Battalion was he in? I think the 5th Seaforths may have used a different pattern.

Any chance of posting the pic?

Chris

I think this is the 5th Seaforths (pattern) their cap badge was also different.

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Sorry I missed this!

As you say, a lovely photo. PROBABLY taken quite early in the war (1915?), perhaps before he first went to France/Flanders. Its interesting because it shows a Simplified Service Dress Jacket (without pocket pleats and rifle patches on shoulders) but one which has been tailored for kilt wear (front skirts rounded off). He still has diced hose and highland gaiters (and a sporran which appears to be the standard Seaforths pattern) rather than puttees and khaki hose, yet he shows no shoulder titles. He is wearing a Pattern 1914 leather equipment belt.

Is the photographer's name/location legible on the original (I am wondering if this might have been taken in Bedford?)

As you say no real clue as to battalion (have you looked up his Medal Index Card MIC? this may indicate battalion) apart from we now know it is NOT the 5th Seaforths! (Glengarry badge)

Some suggest that the absence of shoulder titles indicates a "service" (ie War Raised) battalion although personally I am not convinced of the reliability of this as an indicator.

Chris

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The location of the photographer (stamped bottom right of the image) might give a clue as to the battalion he was with at the time the image was taken.

Edit: just noticed that 4th Gordons already made this point...... Any chance of giving us the location?

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Hi, I have a great, great Uncle who served in this regiment, I have found his medal card which says

Edward John White Sea Highs in Red L/C 2059

Killed in Railway Accident ,

Then in Blue * 6/ Sea Highs *Cpl 265609

Please does anybody know any information happened in this Railway Accident? I found a little note

Serjt. Edward John White TF /265609 6th Bn. Seaforth Highlanders, posted to 1 st Bn. Died of accidental injuries 13 th Aug 1917 Age 27. That's all we have. I would love to be able to tell my very elderly Aunt what happened to him as nobody in the family never knew. They think his was killed in India. His name was read out at the Tower of London on Oct 8 th, very moving.

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Edward John White Sea Highs in Red L/C 2059

Killed in Railway Accident ,

Then in Blue * 6/ Sea Highs *Cpl 265609

Please does anybody know any information happened in this Railway Accident? I found a little note

Serjt. Edward John White TF /265609 6th Bn. Seaforth Highlanders, posted to 1 st Bn. Died of accidental injuries 13 th Aug 1917.

They think his was killed in India.

It might be a good idea to start a separate thread on this man, maybe one in the 'soldiers' section of the forum, and perhaps a second one in the 'India' section asking for tips on researching deaths in India during WW1.

The details that you listed indicate that he initially served with the 6/seaforth. The regimental number (2059) probably indicates that he joined up in the early months of the war. Initially he held the rank of Lance-Corporal (that's the 'L/C' reference). Then he was promoted to Corporal. He was a Territorial soldier, and the regimental service numbers of all Territorials changed in 1917 leading Edward's number to be changed to 265609 in 1917. As I'm sure you already know, Edward is buried in India. But The 6/Seaforths only served in the UK and France. Interesting to see that the CWGC register says that he was 'posted to 1/Seaforths'. They were serving in Mesopotamia (Iraq), so it looks like he must have subsequently been transferred to hospital in India where he was promoted to Sergeant, and it was there that he 'died of accidental injuries', according to CWGC. You're probably going to need to look at India Office records at the British Library for details of a death certificate, or a newspaper report (although I think the British Indian newspapers are held at the British Library Newspaper Collection which I think are still at Colindale).

It's interesting to see that his posting to 1/Seaforths is missing from his MIC, and if it wasn't for the fact that he died in India we'd never have been able to identify this element of his service.

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Thankyou so much, we have no idea what happened to him. I have promised my Aunt I will try and find out what happened to him. This was my first post and a bit nervous case I did it wrong. I will add this in soldiers topic.

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