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Remembered Today:

Civilian CWGC grave for a WW1 soldier


colinalsbury
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It sounds strange at first - but I wonder how many others have come across WW1 soldiers who have ended up being remembered in a civilian CWGC grave?

I hav recently discovered that Jess COCKAYNE who served with Derbyshire Yeomanry (service number 2842) and 14 Durham Light Infantry (service number 43007) - the same units as my grandfather - was unfortunate enough as to be one of the victims of the German bombing raid on 12th/13th December 1940 that destroyed the Marples Hotel, Fitzalan Square, Sheffield.

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I am not sure if I understand your question. Are you saying that a soldier of WW! was killed in an air raid in the UK during WW2 and has a civilian grave?

If so, then if he was a civilian at the time of his death , he would have a civilian grave.

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If a WW1 serviceman died after 1921 he would not generally have a CWGC headstone.

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Any civilian who died during WW2 as a result of the war is commemorated on the CWGC Debt of Honour but they are not eligible for War Grave status.

This followed on from complaints that civilians who died during WW1 were not commemorated.

CGM

Edited to add that all the names are also listed in a set of leather-bound books in Westminster Abbey.

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Given the numbers of civilian casualties, I'm sure there are many more instances of WW2 "civilians" being killed, just that not many of them had their WW1 service mentioned, as they were no longer in the Armed Forces, but many police, fire, fishertmen, ARP Home Guard etc etc must have been of an age to have seen service and/or action in WW1.

It's probable that he may not have been the only man who had served in WW1 among the dead.

A List of those who died is contained in this article: http://www.chrishobbs.com/marples1940.htm

A quick search of the CWGC database comes up with 49 Names, all on 12 December. There may be more that don't have a reference to the Marples Hotel, which is what I used as a Search term.

From Wiki:

The building at the corner of the square as it joins High Street was first occupied by a hotel in 1870; John Marples became the proprietor in 1886 and named the establishment the London Mart however it was always known locally as “The Marples”.

On the night of Thursday 12 December 1940, 280 German bombers attacked Sheffield in what has become known as the Sheffield Blitz. Their target was the steel works producing armaments in the east end of the city, however a mistake in navigation caused the city centre to become the main target. Fire bombs caused widespread panic, and many people took shelter in the Marples’ extensive cellars, believing they were safe under the robust seven-storey building. At 11:44 p.m. the Marples building took a direct hit from a bomb which plunged through the building and detonated just above the cellars, killing approximately 70 people and reducing the building to a 15-foot-high (4.6 m) pile of rubble. The next day seven men were dug out of the rubble still alive, as a small section of cellar roof had, amazingly, withstood the impact.
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Until the original poster clarifies his comments we seem to be going round in circles guys :wacko:

Note to Kevin - There are 2 young women on my local church WW2 memorial who were killed in the Sheffield blitz 12/13 Dec 1940. Jessie Hill is buried in the churchyard but it is not clear if Eunice Markinson's remains were recovered as the shelter she was in took a direct hit. Both appear on the CWGC site.

I believe there were over 600 casualties that night.

The story was that the bombers were being guided by a radio beam towards the steelworks but the beam was "bent" which resulted in the bombs being dropped on the city centre.

Apologies for going off topic and WW1 :blush:

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