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Remembered Today:

Seeking Shoulder Patch ID for a Seaforth Highlander


gordon92
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Am trying to pinpoint the battalion of this Seaforth Highlander.

Could one of our experts identify what I assume is a Division sign on his left shoulder?

Thanks in anticipation.

2SHPteAnthonyGallagherww1_zpse63597ce.jp

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According to the Osprey Men At Arms book on Battle Insignia it is the 2nd battalion and is in Mackenzie Tartan.

TT

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According to the Osprey Men At Arms book on Battle Insignia it is the 2nd battalion and is in Mackenzie Tartan.

TT

I infer then that the shoulder insignia is that of the 4th Division. Thank you, very helpful.

The main subject in the photo has one wound stripe, but the man on his right has four. Date of the photo is likely later in the War and not before 1916.

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G92,

The tartan patch was a battalion identification, not divisional. The 2nd Seaforths adopted the patch in your photo in June 1916. In early 1917 units in the 4th Division began to wear a divisional sign, the silhouette of a ram's head, normally above any battalion sign on the sleeves. The colour of the Divisional sign varied to indicate brigade, green for 10th, yellow for 11th and red for 12th Brigades.

M

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Mike

You are right however it was not inferred it was a div patch. Merely the id of the 2nd battalion placed it into 4th Div. it was always a battalion patch. I also believe they wore a large white C in the early part of the Somme 1916 battle.

TT

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G92,

The tartan patch was a battalion identification, not divisional. The 2nd Seaforths adopted the patch in your photo in June 1916. In early 1917 units in the 4th Division began to wear a divisional sign, the silhouette of a ram's head, normally above any battalion sign on the sleeves. The colour of the Divisional sign varied to indicate brigade, green for 10th, yellow for 11th and red for 12th Brigades.

M

Mike

You are right however it was not inferred it was a div patch. Merely the id of the 2nd battalion placed it into 4th Div. it was always a battalion patch. I also believe they wore a large white C in the early part of the Somme 1916 battle.

TT

Thank you both for clearing up my mistaken inference.

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  • 1 month later...

Mike

You are right however it was not inferred it was a div patch. Merely the id of the 2nd battalion placed it into 4th Div. it was always a battalion patch. I also believe they wore a large white C in the early part of the Somme 1916 battle.

TT

Some fantastic footage on YouTube of 2nd Seaforths at roll call with the aforementioned large white C on upper left arm. Put in search for footagefarm and the video should show up.

Regards

Mike

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Some fantastic footage on YouTube of 2nd Seaforths at roll call with the aforementioned large white C on upper left arm. Put in search for footagefarm and the video should show up.

Regards

Mike

Could you provide a link?

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Could you provide a link?

Good morning Gordon

Was unable to post link (perhaps because I am using my phone).

I have PM'd you and it appears to have been successfully pasted in the message.

Merry Christmas

Mike

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G92,

The tartan patch was a battalion identification, not divisional. The 2nd Seaforths adopted the patch in your photo in June 1916. In early 1917 units in the 4th Division began to wear a divisional sign, the silhouette of a ram's head, normally above any battalion sign on the sleeves. The colour of the Divisional sign varied to indicate brigade, green for 10th, yellow for 11th and red for 12th Brigades.

If you look very carefully at the photo in the OP you can see a rams head patch above the Battn patch on the shoulders of both men. It's perhaps more easily seen on the shoulder of the man just out of shot.
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Well-spotted: there sure is!

BTW, can anyone post the link to the movie footage referred-to above, please?

(And I cannot recall the last time so many correct uses of "infer" appeared in one thread!).

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Well-spotted: there sure is!

BTW, can anyone post the link to the movie footage referred-to above, please?

(And I cannot recall the last time so many correct uses of "infer" appeared in one thread!).

Steven, if this link doesn't work, you could google 'footage farm seaforth somme', you should get a hit.

Edit: It is clear that the link I am pasting is not appearing. As soon as I submit the post, it vanishes. Initially, I thought I'd forgotten to insert it but I tried again using the edit function and it just vanishes. Revert to Plan B and Google!

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Cheers - I'll give it a spin.

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Thanks.

Odd - some of it is from Malins' film, and I suspect the rest is off-cuts from same. Interesting though.

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