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Remembered Today:


Poseidon
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Hi,

Does anyone have a copy of "The Elder Dempster Fleet History 1852 - 1985" by Cowden & Duffy, 1986? If so there is some information about 4th Engineer A.J. Brian on page 130 that I would like.

Tamele was hit amidships by a torpedo 65 m W by S of Fastnet on 16 July 1917. AJ Brian was awarded the DSM for his part in the events and I would like to know what he did. There is a brief and potentially interesting extract on Google books but it doesn't allow one to the whole article.

Thanks in anticipation.

Poseidon

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Where are you located, geographically? I see quite a few libraries around the world have copies. I have had good success cold calling a library and asking them to scan and email me pages (or fax them). Always an option if a forum pal does not have a copy at hand...

If you check Worldcat you can see which libraries near you might be worth calling and/or emailing.

Alternatively, if you have a spare $2,521.22, you can always buy a copy on Amazon!

:blink:

-Daniel

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P

There is a copy in the Special Collections in Southampton Civic Centre Library. I have copied pages for use here before. I will see if I can remember, when I go there next, what it was I actually went there to do !

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Thanks Sotonmate, I'd really appreciate that. I live in Altrincham, Cheshire and there is not a copy in Manchester or Trafford libraries.

Poseidon

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I wonder if Liverpool has a copy as Elder, Dempster were traditionally based there ? Either way,I will try to get there next week,half term this week and no visit to collect grandson from school for Cake Friday !

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I have a copy of The Elder Dempster Fleet History 1852 - 1985, being an ex ED's man. Following is a transcript.

Tamele - 1917

2422 n, 3932 g. 16 July, (Captain T.H.Beard) sunk. 65 miles West by South from the Fastnet by U87 (Kapitanleutnant Rudolf Schneider) in a submerged torpedo attack, voyage West Africa to Liverpool, with passengers and West African produce, with the loss of one life. When off the south-west coast of Ireland at 0545 a submarine was sighted which discharged a torpedo, but by a skilful manoeuvre of TAMELE, it missed and passed harmlessly 30 feet astern. The submarine then appeared right astern at 0605 and opened fire at a distance of about 1000 yards. TAMELE, which was hit seven times, none being dangerous, replied with 20 rounds, all of which fell short. Immediately the submarine had been sighted, wireless messages were sent out for assistance, and at this point in the combat a destroyer appeared on the scene. The submarine hurriedly submerged, and the liner continued on her way. The whole day passed uneventfully, but at 2040 without the slightest warning TAMELE suddenly shook from stem to stern; she had been hit by a torpedo right amidships, wrecking the engine room. In order to stop the engines 4th.Engineer A.J.Brian, climbed down the telegraph stanchions, as the ladders had been blown away, while the engine room had been flooded through the gaping hole rent in the ship's side. The discipline of the men was excellent, and out of a crew of 59 only one man lost his life. For their services on this occasion Captain Beard received the Distinguished Service Cross and the Distinguished Service Medal was awarded to Mr.A.J.Brian.

U87, then under the command of Kapitanleutnant Freiherr Rudolf von Speth-Schulzburg, was sunk with all hands by HMS P56 in 52deg.56'N 05Deg.07'W on 25 December 1917. P56 forced the U-boat, which was at periscope depth, to the surface by attacking with depth-charges and then gunned and rammed her. On 13 October 1917 Shneider had been washed overboard from U87 in heavy seas in the Central North Atlantic. Although picked up he failed to respond to efforts at resuscitation

.

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OyiboJohn

Saved me a visit !

Destroyer on scene was the USS Cushing (DD-55) posted to Queenstown early in 1917 for patrol and escort duties.

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That was a good catch sotonmate - concerning the supposed rescuer! Makes the story even more interesting.

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Thanks everyone, especially OyiboJohn for the transcript. I couldn't find any reference to the Tamele in the "Times" or the "Guardian".

It confirms the story that caught my attention in the Altrincham, Bowdon and Hale Guardian of 25 Jan 1918 when A J (Alexander James) Brian went back to his old school, Seamon's Moss in Dunham Massey where he received a large ovation from the pupils. He appears to have joined the RAF after this event and was killed in 1920 and is buried at Halton St Michaels's Churchyard in Bucks.

Poseidon

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You're welcome Poseidon. I had only just joined - looked at the Ships and Navies link - being an ex MN seaman (albeit in Pursering/Catering) and Tamele being a recognisable Elder Dempster name (ships of the line were generally all called after West African towns, rivers or geographical features) caught my attention. I 'stood by' Tamele (II) for a brief period.

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