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WWI and WWII Bayonets and Daggers care


Rkymtnkat
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Help, please. I have inherited what was left of my dads collection of edged weapons. Problem was I found them in a wooden ammo crate stored outside by a tree. So now I have only been able to salvage a portion and I need to know how to prevent more rust and what is the best way to preserve the wood. What would be the best way to save these??

Plus are any of them worth something despite the rust damage? I have a Ross Rifle bayonet stamped patented 1907with scabbard that is in rough shape, a 1907 Wilkenson, Stamped WSC but no model number like S294 with blackened finish in nice shape w/ scabbard, US M3 Kinfolks inc knife and scabbard that has some rust issues, etc..

I may have done great value damage to a WWII Village blacksmith bolo with scabbard, I took a very fine grade nail file to the surface rust. It did not have much and seems in fine condition. Did I just turn it into a worthless collectors paperweight?

Any and all suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

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It may have been best to soak the metalwork in something like WD40 and use very fine wire wool to see what happens. I am certain that even that method may be too rough for some.

Sepoy

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Thank you I didn't know what type oil would be best on the blades without increasing the rust. Some of the leather that got wet and moldy went bye bye, it was toxic. I hope to find out if any of this is worth enough to take the time to clean. Ideas for the leather?

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I've been collecting bayonets for years and I use WD40 and very fine wire wool, bayonets are hardy souls and it won't damage them.

Just soak them with WD over night and it gets a lot of the muck off. I wouldn't recommend using sand paper or files, as it encourages the bare metal to rust up.

baz


I use black or neutral boot polish on the leather scabbards, or Chelsea leather food.

Baz

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Thank you so much for the advice. I have lots of work ahead of me, if this is worth the time and effort. I am still trying to figure out where all the trench knifes with knuckle dusters went. But it would be nice to salvage a bit of dads collection.

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I am curious to know about the 1907, Wilkenson, it has a nice black admiralty finish. I believe that would be from the WWII contract, everything I am finding on line has a few more marks, such as S294. This has the crown g.r. 1907 WSC and I believe date of 4 42. That is all on that side, is this a fake?

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I've been collecting bayonets for years and I use WD40 and very fine wire wool, bayonets are hardy souls and it won't damage them.

Just soak them with WD over night and it gets a lot of the muck off. I wouldn't recommend using sand paper or files, as it encourages the bare metal to rust up.

baz

I use black or neutral boot polish on the leather scabbards, or Chelsea leather food.

Baz

You said they are hardy souls, could this mean I did not completely trash the Bolo by the light filing?

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You said they are hardy souls, could this mean I did not completely trash the Bolo by the light filing?

Well, some are hardier than others! The suggestions for WD40 and steel wool are ok, although I use fine-grain rubbing 'wet' paper followed by a wipe and a finish with wirewool and then Autosol and a polish. I was taught this method by a professional antique sword restorer and it works well. But, I only use this for getting the worse rust and stains of a blade to check identifying marks, etc., as I like the patina on an old bayonet - and it does take some practice to get it right. The guy who taught me goes the whole way to end up with a really brightly shining blade.

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Edged tools are often returned to a good finish by using a ball of crumpled silver foil and 'Autosolv' type metal polish.

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Edged tools are often returned to a good finish by using a ball of crumpled silver foil and 'Autosolv' type metal polish.

Interesting! I knew this worked on chrome, but not that it worked on steel. I'll try it with my favourite 'testing' piece, a really badly rusted and shortened EB 9...

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Interesting! I knew this worked on chrome, but not that it worked on steel. I'll try it with my favourite 'testing' piece, a really badly rusted and shortened EB 9...

The silver foil method is a 2nd stage process, it won't cope with heavy rust - take that of first!

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The silver foil method is a 2nd stage process, it won't cope with heavy rust - take that of first!

OK. I have a few other specimens stained rather than rusted ones that I can use for trying this method on. Thanks!

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I am curious to know about the 1907, Wilkenson, it has a nice black admiralty finish. I believe that would be from the WWII contract, everything I am finding on line has a few more marks, such as S294. This has the crown g.r. 1907 WSC and I believe date of 4 42. That is all on that side, is this a fake?

The WSC S294 marked 1907 Pattern Sword Bayonet is a WW2 contract. It is not a fake.

Sepoy

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First I must say thank you all of you for the information. Whew, I thought maybe I would be stuck with more hassles then enjoyment of bringing life back to these. I had never heard of Autosol.

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The WSC S294 marked 1907 Pattern Sword Bayonet is a WW2 contract. It is not a fake.

Sepoy

Oh my poor description is the problem is there is not a S294 mark, all the other marks on both sides are the legit ones. Just not a model. That is why I am wondering if it is fake. Hey, I am new to this and at least I got the rest of its age, finish, WW2 contract, correct.
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I had never heard of Autosol.

Not easy to find though... Generally used for cleaning up chrome...

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A number of people have started recommending PEEK metal polish.

I had a look at some of the online reviews and seem to be very good, especially on brass ware.

Anyone used this product and was it as good as people say?

Baz

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Just for F.Y.I., if you ever come across bayonets with leather scabbards that have had mildew issues, use caution. The older the leather the more caustic the tanning process, add mold and it is dangerous. Skin and inhaling can be a problem. I wound up with the meanest case of hives for over a month just from opening the box unaware of its contents.

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Glad it passed over! But yes, mouldy leather may well have nasty spores... Why on earth, though, was all the stuff buried / neglected for so long?

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  • 1 year later...

resurrected this thread as it had reference to the bolo knife of the AEF and was just plain 'interesting', I dug out my M1910 bolo for you all to have a look at it is a 1917 dated Springfield made 1910 model with the locking button. The scabbard is 1918 by Brahuer bros.

khaki

post-29707-0-96066900-1447794622_thumb.j post-29707-0-16963600-1447794664_thumb.j

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resurrected this thread as it had reference to the bolo knife of the AEF and was just plain 'interesting', I dug out my M1910 bolo for you all to have a look at it is a 1917 dated Springfield made 1910 model with the locking button. The scabbard is 1918 by Brahuer bros.

khaki

attachicon.gif1117151110.jpg attachicon.gif1117151112.jpg

That's a beautiful looking Knife thanks for sharing. Some interesting pointers have been posted regarding care very helpful.

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