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Remembered Today:

R(?) Krstic, Serbian officer at Brindisi


seaJane
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Afternoon all,

The following have just surfaced in our cellar, and my colleague would like to put them on display for the imminent Heritage Open Days weekend.

Can anyone supply a transcription, or relevant information? We'll be very grateful! I can make out the printed name at the foot of the photo, but my 1980s Russian O Level isn't up to the inscription apart from 1916 g., year 1916.

post-33278-0-20856300-1410365771_thumb.j

Two more posts to follow.

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post-33278-0-24733800-1410366128_thumb.j

On the verso of the portrait, mostly easy: ?Pristech. An officer of the Serbian Army at Brindisi. 1914-1918 War.

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post-33278-0-85188200-1410366465_thumb.j

In association with this portrait, although we can't be 100% sure that they have always been together, a picture of a bridge. All I can say is that it isn't at Mostar, which is what sprang to mind; I don't even know whether it's in Serbia or Brindisi.

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Ah, oooops. Thanks Adrian!

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Not certain, but it's something along the lines of...

Драгоме пријатељу
за успешну
Жив, (?)Р. Крстић
1916г.

Roughly: "Wishing my dear friend a successful Life, (?)R. Krstić, 1916"

Adrian

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Thank you so much Adrian! Now I look again, the initial on the verso inscription shows signs of being altered to a K.from a C.

Does anyone here research the Serbian army?

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Jane, I read the first word of the verso as "Kristic" which would fit to Adrian's reading of "Krstić". So I assume that's the officer's name.

Did Serbian troops came to Italy after Serbia's defeat in 1915/16? I have only read they came to Corfu and Salonika but may of course be wrong.

Regards

Karsten

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Thank you Karsten!

I have chased the Brindisi connection online, and it seems that the Serbian government temporarily relocated to Brindisi in January 1916 before moving to Corfu on a longer-term basis.

What someone from the RN Medical Service was doing in Brindisi is anyone's guess (I presume that's how the picture reached us).

Everyone that I show the bridge picture to says that it looks Chinese to them, so there may be no connection at all...

sJ

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My Serbian is so bad (=non-existent) that I should be embarrassed. But maybe I'll summon up the nerve to make an enquiry in English some time!

Thank you very much for the link Karsten!

sJ

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  • 1 month later...

Just now saw this thread - wotcha Jane, I remember you from my zepp thread ( http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=197801 ) :w00t: . I'm pretty sure it's written - Драгоме пријатељу за успомену, not успешну; meaning "to a dear friend, for remembrance" or "for memory"; 'успешну' is just an adjective and it means 'successful'. He's not wishing him a successful life, as mentioned earlier - there's no mention of the word life (живот), those first three letters Жив. is a short of his full name (Живојин or Живорад is my guess). R. is the first letter of his father's name, and Крстић is his last name. And if he was to wish him a successful life, it would've been успешнИ живот, not успешнУ живот... it would take me too much time to explain why the adjective is changing in various cases, depending on a noun... anyhow, it's gotta be 'успомену' (lat. uspomenu), even today it's a common phrase here when signing a photo or a book...

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Thanks Milan!

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