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robbie

Windhuk POW camp SW Africa

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robbie

I have been reading the Times History of the War, and in particular the two chapters about the British + French + Australian POWs. A reference is made to an inquiry into the appallingly bad treatment by the Germans of British POWs in a camp called Windhuk in SOuth West Africa. The report was published in Capetown in 1916.

Does anyone have a copy of this? If not, can anyone provide more information about this camp? Also, I believe this part of Africa belonged to the Germans then, but how did the war begin in this area? Who was in charge of the Brits and the Germans?

Robbie

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KONDOA

General Louis Botha led a S.African incursion in SWA and was promptly defeated by the colony forces. However he recovered and made one strong advance resulting in the unconditional surrender of the colony.

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robbie

Thanks Rupert. My knowledge re Africa + Boer War + Great war is very limited, i'm afraid. In Oz we didn't get any of this in history lessons. Wonder why?

Robbie

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KONDOA

Hi Robbie, Theres not a lot written recently about this, although it has quite a coverage in some of the large volumes produced in the 20's and 30's. This site search may have some bits to whet your appetite but its a bit painful to use.

http://rapidttp.com/milhist/

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robbie
Theres not a lot written recently about this, although it has quite a coverage in some of the large volumes produced in the 20's and 30's. This site search may have some bits to whet your appetite but its a bit painful to use.

Thanks Rupert. What's your connection with Africa?

Robbie

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KONDOA

Hi again Robbie,

What's your connection with Africa?

My grandfather was in East Africa with Smut's Army in General Julius Van Deventers 2nd East African Infantry Brigade. He was a gunner in the 11th Hull Heavy Battery (11th & 13th Howitzer Bty in Africa), 38th brigade RGA from March 1916 - February 1918. Thats the main reason. I sometimes go to North Africa working though and I find it a fascinating place.

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robbie
Hi again Robbie,

What's your connection with Africa?

That's interesting, Rupert. I'll be calling in to Johannesberg and Capetown early Jan 2005 which will be my first visit to Africa. Any must see memorials etc to check out while i'm there? I have 3 days in Capetwon.

Robbie

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KONDOA
Any must see memorials etc to check out while i'm there?

Not as I can immediately think of Robbie. However, if your in Cape Town theres a CWGC burial area in Plumstead Cemetary where many of the troops who died of desease and malaria are buried.

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robbie
Any must see memorials etc to check out while i'm there?

Not as I can immediately think of Robbie. However, if your in Cape Town theres a CWGC burial area in Plumstead Cemetary where many of the troops who died of desease and malaria are buried.

Thanks Rupert..will check it out..

robbie

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Terry Denham

Here's a list of all the CWGC cemeteries in Cape Town with numbers of war graves.

WW1 war graves only

Cape Town (Claremont) St Saviour's Cemetery 1

Cape Town (Constantia) Public Cemetery 3

Cape Town (Klip, Grassy Park) Cemetery 2

Cape Town (Maitland) Cemetery 436

Cape Town (Muizenburg) Cemetery 1

Cape Town (Phillipi) Evangelical Lutherian Cemetery 1

Cape Town (Plumstead) Cemetery 145

Cape Town (Wynberg, Church Street) Cemetery 6

Cape Town (Wynberg, Wetton Road) Cemetery 1

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robbie

Thanks Terry. That will fill in the 3 days nicely. :D

Robbie

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Guest bonza

G'day Robbie

A quick dash to the Pretoria Cemetery could be of interest.

Apparently a group of Australian Officers 'passed around the hat" & built a memorial to Morant & Handcock. For many years it was well maintained by person or persons unknown & added to the Breaker mystique.

Have a look here The Breaker NB Pretoria is listed under Church Street Pretoria. The Grave shown must be an "Official" replacement for the "Original"

How do you manage a trip like that? Funds aren't dependent on the outcome of a horserace in a week or so?

ooRoo

Pat

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Archer
General Louis Botha led a S.African incursion in SWA and was promptly defeated by the colony forces. However he recovered and made one strong advance resulting in the unconditional surrender of the colony.

It was slightly more nuanced, I think.

South Africa went to war against Germany following the British declaration on 4 August 1914.

During that month a force of regulars and citizen force units was landed at Port Nolloth in the the Northern Cape, menacing the Germans in South West Africa (GSWA).

Then on 18 September, the South Africans landed at Luderitz Bay in GSWA, which had been abandoned by the Germans.

One of Botha's very rare regular units, the 1/SA Mounted Rifles, suffered defeat at Sandfontein, on the Northern Cape/GSWA border on 26 September 1914 - perhaps partly as a result of the treachery of Colonel Maritz, one of South Africa's senior officers, watching the border to the east, who went over to the Germans.

Thereafter, the South Africans were forced to deal with an armed uprising by disaffected Afrikaners at home, which was brought to a close on 8 December 1914.

On 14 January 1915 the South Africans landed at Swakopmund on the GSWA coast, and a campaign was launched which saw forces converging on the German garrison from North, South, Centre and even East (!).

The Germans surrendered on 9 July 1915.

My interest lies in the fact that my grandfather, a 22 year old Rifleman in the 1/SAMR, was slightly wounded and taken prisoner at Sandfontein (before the cut-off date for the Mons Star in France!!) He was held as a prisoner - not in Windhoek (Windhuk) itself, I think - until released on the arrival of the South African forces on 6 July 1914. He retained a lifelong bitterness against his captors because after some nine months in the Bag, the prisoners' boots had fallen to pieces and when they were marched through the desert to a new camp, many of them were effectively barefoot. Their feet suffered terribly.

... General Julius Van Deventer's 2nd East African Infantry Brigade

I don't want to be overly pedantic, but he was Jacob Louis van Deventer.

Regards

William

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robbie
How do you manage a trip like that? Funds aren't dependent on the outcome of a horserace in a week or so?

ooRoo

Pat

Hi Bonza,

Thanks for the Pretoria information. How do I fund this? It's paid for by work. Have a conference in Wellington early January so will include a trip to visit the family in Sydney and then back to UK via Capetown.

Robbie

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KONDOA

Thanks there William, dont know where I got Julius from? Combination of Jacob and Louis has occured somewhere. :rolleyes:

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