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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:


seaforths
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I understand that the bridge was just beyond the British front line trenches. The current bridge is on or very close to the alignment of the original bridge and the road it carries ran through the small "box" of trenches by railway line partly coloured blue and then just in front of the British trench 39 for a distance, the road then curved towards the German line. The blue thing you marked on the 1915 trench map is a barricade to help control any German infiltration down the railway cutting. I have seen a similar one marked on maps on the German side of the cutting.

There is a British Army panoramic photograph showing the Bridge, Hill 60 and you can see the Trench marked CT 38 running along side the cutting up towards the Bridge. This photo is reproduced in th Nigel Cave book and in the excellent "the Great War seen from the Air, in Flanders Field" which also has two aerial photographs of hill 60 one taken in Dec 1914 and the second in May 1915 after the first British mines were blown in mid April.

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Thanks gmac101 - yes - I see Aurel said the bridge was under repair at the time he posted. I don't have either of those books. Could you please tell me, does Nigel Cave source his map?

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  • 1 year later...

 Illustrated Chronicle  27th of February 1915.

 

bone.JPG

 

Caption

Local casualties include the following:- Killed: Sapper G. Bone,

1st Northumbrian Royal Engineers of Ashington (well known local footballer).

 

 

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Great find Ray! Good but so sad too to see a photograph of him. It's a shame that the family member I forwarded the images and information to via email didn't even acknowledge their receipt - despite me asking them if they had received it. I'm guessing they did and couldn't be bothered to reply.

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Good to see you back Seaforths after a period of some tribulation! Sorry to hear that your willing help to the Bone relatives went unacknowledged...

 

Trajan

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Yes, getting a little more time freed up - slowly. Nice to be back. Ray's photo is much better quality than the previous one. It's a shame that so many people contributed so much to the thread and no comeback. I suppose that's the chance taken when giving information. The italics are not intentional.  It seems that the upgraded forum and  my iPad keyboard are incompatible. If I use a capital i it throws it in and out of italics at will - very, very frustrating. I can't even be bothered to attempt to correct it anymore - lost the will to live on that one.

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2 hours ago, seaforths said:

Ray's photo is much better quality than the previous one.

 

 

Oh and I prefer the previous one (Post 93)

 

Regards Ray

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5 hours ago, RaySearching said:

 

 

Oh and I prefer the previous one (Post 93)

 

Regards Ray

 

Really? I thought the new one is a little clearer and shows him in better detail. Just goes to show how preferences can differ between folks :D

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  • 7 months later...

Dear M. I am so sorry I was unable to respond to the message you sent me in 2015. I have just now sent you an email explaining the unfortunate personal circumstances that prevented me from acknowledging all your help etc.

 

Once more thank you for taking the time to reply and your help.

I see I did thank people collectively for the information in this thread but in case anyone missed it, please accept my most sincere and grateful thanks, however belatedly.

Unfortunately, sometimes we are unable to engage in the social etiquette that is expected of us. I assure you this was one of those times.

Thank you

D

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  • 4 years later...

Just picked this thread up. The Lieutenant White mentioned here was responsible for blowing the first British mine in Ypres Salient on 17 February 1915.  ( Tunnellers by Grieve and Newman page 39) presumably  Sapper Bone was killed in the mine tunnel of this mine.

This mining of an old French mine was started by White 10 February 1915. (See WD 84 Brigade) 
 

David 

 

DCCBFF5E-7381-4953-B5FD-4E9260C67D9B.jpeg

Edited by David_Blanchard
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