Jump to content

Remembered Today:

How To Carry Yer Rifle


PhilB
 Share

Recommended Posts

The photo is from Paxman`s book and shows "Chipping Norton territorials marching off to war in August 1914". A number of the men are marching with the rifle reversed over the shoulder. It`s a technique I don`t recall seeing much in photos from WW1 or WW2 and it`s not one I saw during my own NS time when we still had the SMLE. Is it perhaps that the Metford (which I assume these are) is of a slimmer shape which lends itself to this type of carriage?

post-2329-0-98041300-1405773542_thumb.jp

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Chipping Norton Territorials would be E Company 1/4th Bn Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry: Coy HQ at Chipping Norton with drill stations at Kingham, Charlbury, Shipton and Stow-on-the -Wold...it was a long march as they went to Chelmsford and it took seven months before they disembarked in Boulogne

Note the Officer's distinctive collar badge on his lapel and his double strapped Sam-Browne.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can relate to the carrying of arms of the man behind the army/civvy greet.

Still used today between shooting pegs

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Note the Officer's distinctive collar badge on his lapel an his double strapped Sam-Browne.

I thought they were staff tabs! Single cuff band - subaltern?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That is "marching at ease - butts up" certainly performed by Rifle Regiments. Starting with the weapon at 'The trail', grasp the rifle with the left hand just to the front of the middle band, thumb to rear. Then with both arms swing the rifle so it is bolt down, and land it with the bolt to the rear of the shoulder strap of the left shoulder. Immediately cut the right arm away to the side, and as this is marching at ease continue with the rifle comfortably settled. To recover - grasp the rifle with the right hand just forward of the magazine, palm upwards, and swing the rifle into the at The Trail, cutting the left arm away to the side. It’s also wise to ensure you are double spacing as you need to get a good swing.

G

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Of course, a proper regiment would attach the rifle to the horse.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Slightly off topic - but what equipment are they wearing?

It looks like 1903 pouches/belt but with shoulder braces and with pouches doubled up to resemble 08 web gear.

The rifles are Charger Loading Lee-Enfields (CLLE) - you can see the sight-protector ears that we added when the front sights were modified from MLM/MLE.

Chris

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Chris,

its 03 pattern bandolier equipment, numerous Territorial units added additional cartridge carriers to increase the ammunition carrying capacity and to make it look similar to 08. These one appear to have a row of additional pouches under the set attached to the belt. The straps over the shoulder that you can see are from the great coat carrier and there are some exceptionally large bread bags on show also.

regards

Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Of course, a proper regiment would attach the rifle to the horse.

The horse having the brains of the outfit?

T8Hants, is the drill movement in anyway comftable or of any practical use? It just looks wrong to me, the weight of the butt and bolt away from your hands.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I find it comfortable, makes a change from having it slung over your shoulder , if you get the balance right it feels fine

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I find it comfortable, makes a change from having it slung over your shoulder , if you get the balance right it feels fine

So not a natural position?

How many regiments used the drill movement?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Of course, a proper regiment would attach the rifle to the horse.

Mr Broomfield Sir, you know very well the only dumb creatures that should be taken into battle are Staff Officers!

As RobL has commented it is a very comfortable way to carry a rifle, and gives the arm a rest if carrying at The Trail, which you can do in both the right and left hand, as you know. You do need to be in open order as if done on the march a good swing is needed with plenty of room to the front. Thou shalt not carry out this manouver with swords fixed, but as Rifle Regiments shall not fix swords this is not a problem.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Of course, a proper regiment would attach the rifle to the horse.

I'll not rise to that, save to cite the old rifles saw ...

Guards use the rifle to drill with,

Rifles use the rifle to kill with

:hypocrite:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi all,

they are marching at ease, which means they usually carried their rifles in different positions without recourse to drill movements. The photo shows weapons ''butt up'' on the left and right shoulder, ''butts down'' and some with weapons slung. The position could be changed as and when required

regards

Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Was it only KRRC and Rifle Regiments? When did it cease (if it did)? :unsure:

Probably when the FN FAL was taken into service. 1959 for the infantry.

I remember another rifle drill movement which expired about the same time, I think it was called "Recover". You held the No4 horizontal under the armpit, muzzle forward, steadying it by holding on to the rifle body with your hand between the upper sling swivel and the nosecap. I was told the purpose was to keep breech and bolt clean and dry, and the movement was used when wearing the old waterproof cape.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Any time I have to carry one my "Long Lees" this is the prefered way I usually carry it. It is much more comfortable then the normal way most carry their rifles.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...